The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 02, 1879
    Invitation to Participate in the Chicago Mining and Milling Company

    In inviting the public--and particularly my compatriots, the Germans--to become stockholders in the Chicago Mining and Milling Company which I have organized, I consider it appropriate to publish the following information:

    The Chicago Mining and Milling Company is not a mining venture in the usually accepted sense of the term, since this corporation has as solid a foundation as any business enterprise (sic).

    The main object of the Company is to build reduction works [ore mills] in one of the richest mining districts of Arizona. This part of the country has always lacked sufficient equipment, and there is sufficient ore available from mines already established nearby to keep the projected ore-crusher busy night and 2day. If, therefore, human calculations are at all reliable, capital invested in this enterprise will begin to earn returns immediately.

    In my travels through Arizona, I found that the reports of earlier prospectors about this rich silver country were not only substantiated, but also that in many cases they underestimated its wealth. And I also noticed that the lack of capital made the exploitation of these natural treasures exceedingly difficult.

    The local prospectors are poor, plain people, suspicious of speculators, averse to letting their discoveries fall into the hands of others without adequate renumeration--which is natural enough, since the finding of these deposits entailed considerable hardship and privation. I found this [attitude] particularly in the forested and well-watered Globe district, an area which my investigation and travels have shown to be the richest part of Southern Arizona. I saw an opportunity here for a profitable enterprise requiring comparatively little money, and I decided to induce my friends in the East [Translator's note: He means Chicago.] to become associated with me in the erection of ore-reduction works.

    3

    The discoverers and owners of the Julius Mine (one of the richest mines in the district. It has already produced fifteen thousand dollars worth of ore at an assayed value of $100 to $20,000 per ton, and there are indications that the veins are extensive and deep) heard of my intentions to build ore-processing works. These men were so convinced of the importance and the potential profitableness of the venture, that they offered to subscribe to one half of the shares if I organized a company to erect and operate an ore mill. In payment of these shares, the mine owners offered to transfer to the company title to their property The mining property includes twenty mines, among them the Julius, the Chloride, the Red Rover, and others whose values I have investigated. The property also includes twenty thousand dollars' worth of ore, already mined.

    This offer seemed so encouraging that I resolved to modify my original plan, in order to base the enterprise on this proposition.

    The agreement involving the mines was barely consummated when Carl Soyer, who had resided in this district for two years and had studied practical metallurgy in Germany, gave me $2,000 as an investment.

    4

    I then organized the Chicago Mining and Milling Company under the laws of the State of Illinois. The Company is capitalized at $1,000,000. The par value of a share of stock is $100, and $10,000 shares will be issued. Of this number, 4,000 are to be sold at $25 each for the purpose of raising money for the erection of a reduction works and to provide the necessary [starting] capital.

    After the purchase price for these shares has been paid they involve no further liability. Assessments which in other mining ventures prove such a disaster for small investors-- and provide an excellent method for unscrupulous directors to acquire entire companies--are absolutely excluded from the plan of organization of this company.

    The owners of the 4,000 shares now offered for sale will actually control the company and elect the presiding officers. The provisional directorate will resign as soon as a sufficient number of shares have been subscribed for.

    For myself, I do not ask a penny from the sale of these 4,000 shares. When the money has been raised for the construction of the mill, I intend to function 5only as one of the directors and as manager of operations. I intend to return to Arizona in the interests of the corporation and to superintend the building of the reduction works and its operation.

    There is little risk for bondholders of the Chicago Milling Company. The investors do not assume any other liability; through the election of their own executives, they retain control over their money as well as over the income derived therefrom and cannot be cheated out of their shares by "assessments" and other tricks.

    Their money, also, will not be dissipated in the ground and made subject to luck, as is the case in prospecting, because the funds are to be used for constructing a mill in a district where valuable ore has been and is being brought to the surface daily, ready to be converted into cash.

    I am so fully convinced that the enterprise will be successful that I intend to dedicate all of my time to it. Within a short period, I hope to make the 6Chicago Mining and Milling Company one of the most reliable and profitable stock ventures in the land.

    Further information about the Company's mines is contained in our prospectus, but I shall be glad to give additional explanations to all who are interested in these matters. I extend a cordial invitation to the public to inspect the ore samples that we now have on display. This rare, high-grade ore has astounded all experienced observers.

    You may see me at any time Room 33, Staatszeitungs Building. There is elevator service in the building.

    Messrs. Wasmannsdorf and Heinemann, 165 East Randolph Street, are the financial agents of the Company, and they will accept subscriptions to shares at their offices. Any information desired, and the prospectus as well, may be secured at this address.

    A. C. Hesing

    In inviting the public--and particularly my compatriots, the Germans--to become stockholders in the Chicago Mining and Milling Company which I have organized, I consider it appropriate to publish the following ...

    German
    II A 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 03, 1879
    [Chicago Mining and Milling Company] (Advertisement) the Chicago Mining and Milling Company Organized under the Laws of the State of Illinois

    Capital $1,000,000

    10,000 Bonds @ $100

    John Hise, president

    Otto Wasmansdorff, secretary-treasurer

    The Chicago Mining and Milling Company was founded to erect and operate ore crushers in the Globe District, central part of Arizona, as well as to exploit twenty mines, all of which give indications of great value. The Globe District was discovered only recently--two years ago. Within the confines of that territory [Globe District] there are the Silver Era, the Cox and Copelin, the Mexican, the Mc Morris, and the Stonewall Jackson mines, the richness 2of whose ore is already recognized in San Francisco. The property of the Chicago Mining and Milling Company is in close proximity to these mines and promises, in some parts, even better results. For example, the Julius Mine produced a higher grade ore than any of the mines mentioned above and, according to indications, the veins of the Julius Mine are fully as rich as any other in Arizona. This part of the state lacks neither wood nor water and is accessible by good roads throughout the year. After May 1, when the Southern Pacific Railroad, now being built, reaches this part of the country, the mines will be within fifty miles of a railroad.

    The discoverers of these mines in the Globe District are poor, plain people, suspicious of speculators, and are averse to yielding their hard-earned acquisitions to others without adequate remuneration. As they had no capital, they were not able to install ore crushers to convert their rich treasures into money, so, in order to supply this equipment, the Chicago Mining and Milling Company was organized. The projected reducing works will be 3busy day and night as soon as we are able to treat the ore from the many mines in this vicinity; therefore, as soon as operations commence, the Company will have an income of about $200 per day. (The mill will have a capacity of 15 tons per day and the profit per ton amounts to $15.) The Chicago Mining and Milling Company intends to erect its stamping machinery before digging ore, so that the corporation will be able to defray its mining costs from its income [e.g., from reducing the ore of other mines @ $15 per ton].

    Of the 10,000 bonds of the Company, 4,000 will be sold at $25 each; the entire proceeds derived there from will be used for construction of the mill and to provide capital for its operation.

    [Translator's note: The information in the paragraphs omitted here, is contained in the January 2 issue of Illinois Staats-Zeitung.] These bonds may be procured through the bankers Wasmansdorff and Heinemann, 165 East Randolph 4Street. A prospectus and any other desired information may also be obtained there.

    We consider the bonds of the Chicago Mining and Milling Company an excellent investment and recommend them to our business associates and the public in general. In investigating the enterprise we convinced ourselves of its reliability as well as honesty of purpose and, as evidence of its local esteem, we may add that the first eighty bonds were subscribed to by a Mr. Carl Soyek, a resident of the Globe District for two years and a practical miner and metallurgist who studied in Germany. We also desire to call your attention to the fact that the Company, in compliance with the laws of Illinois, leaves its contracts in the custody of its bondholders.

    Capital $1,000,000 10,000 Bonds @ $100 John Hise, president Otto Wasmansdorff, secretary-treasurer The Chicago Mining and Milling Company was founded to erect and operate ore crushers in the Globe District, ...

    German
    II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 04, 1879
    Die Deutsche Gesellschaft

    The Executive Board of the Deutsche Gesellschaft (German Society) at its regular monthly session yesterday, considered the quarterly report of the city collector and the monthly report of the agent. The former showed that of the outstanding accounts, amounting to $367.75, $339.75 had been collected. The report of the agent follows:

    "During the past month the old year came to an end, a cold, bitterly cold departure, particularly for the poor and the destitute. Therefore, requests for aid and support were more numerous than in former months. Of course we cannot give to all applicants; our meager means do not permit it; nevertheless, only a few were refused. It is highly desirable that additional funds be procured to combat distress which will prevail within the next three months.

    "Last month 247 persons sought help and we gave donations, etc., amounting to $240.10. Altogether 763 persons called at our office seeking help of some kind.

    2

    "This is the worst season for the great mass of our unemployed. Only 18 employers hired people, while 203 jobless persons applied for work; we could place a mere 39.

    "We procured hospital acceptance for 17 poor, sick people and provided means for temporary room and board to 43 persons.

    "Immigration, as usual at this time, presents a very weak figure, so there were only 200 arrivals of mixed nationalities in Chicago. Only a few of this contingent settled in the city; most of them continued their journey elsewhere."

    Mr. Beiersdorff in submitting his committee report anent the arrangements for an entertainment, showed that the negotiations with Mr. Liesegang involving the production of an opera or concert have not yet reached the final stage, but satisfactory results are expected within a few days.

    3

    About ten new membership applications were in evidence, and steps have been taken to boost the ebbing cash resources--a temporary measure at least.

    The Executive Board of the Deutsche Gesellschaft (German Society) at its regular monthly session yesterday, considered the quarterly report of the city collector and the monthly report of the agent. ...

    German
    II D 10, III G, II D 3, II D 8
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 04, 1879
    The Athenaeum Music School

    The Athenaeum Music School, under the direction of Professor Fuchs, opens its first course January 6. Last night an entertainment was given at the large hall of the Athenaeum to introduce the staff of the Music School to the public. In spite of the extremely cold weather a large crowd attended.

    Judge Henry Booth, President of the Athenaeum gave the opening address. This was followed by Beethoven's Overture, "Die Weihe Des Hauses," which was presented by Messrs. Fuchs and Dyhrenfurth, and which was immensely enjoyed by the audience.

    When Mrs. C. Koelling, who appeared next on the program, sang the aria, "Ich Weiss, Dass Mein Erloeser Lebt," the audience was left with no doubt of her excellent musical ability. Mrs. Koelling is endowed with a soprano of great range and of pleasant tone color, and she also has a depth of understanding which enables her to make her presentations in an appealing and convincing 2manner. Her mode of singing is excellent, and proves that she is fully capable of utilizing her natural gifts.

    Then followed a lengthy address by Reverend Thomas, after which Mrs. Koeling sang the "Elviren-Arie" from Mozart's "Don Juan". Her rendition, which was given in an expressive and ingratiating manner, was enthusiastically received, and the audience insisted upon an encore.

    The last selections consisted of a number of piano recitals[given by their pupils] in which Messrs. Fuchs and Dyhrenfurth displayed virtuosity and gave evidence of their ability.

    The Athenaeum Music School, under the direction of Professor Fuchs, opens its first course January 6. Last night an entertainment was given at the large hall of the Athenaeum to ...

    German
    II B 2 f, II A 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 06, 1879
    Wilhelmi

    Yesterday afternoon, January 6, Wilhelmi gave his last Chicago concert for the season. Let us hope that he will return within the near future. It was a splendid idea to induce the great artist to arrange a Sunday program at the North Side Turnhalle as it was thus possible for many people who do not frequent concert halls to enjoy the magic strains of his violin.

    Long before the beginning of the concert the entrance hall and stairway were crowded. More than 2,500 people were present, some of whom were forced to stand, and it is not likely that the Turnhalle has ever housed a greater multitude.

    Most of the audience was German, but the American elite was also well represented. Many a fashionably dressed lady appeared who, on any other Sunday afternoon, would have scorned the idea of being seen in the Turnhalle, or perhaps anywhere except in her home or at church.

    2

    Smoking and drinking were not permitted last night--the usual convivial character of the Turnhalle concerts had to undergo certain transformations in order that the program might attract as large an audience as possible.

    The concert began shortly after 3 P.M. The Chicago Orchestra, under the direction of A. Rosenbecker, played the "Overture from Aladdin,"by Hornemann. The orchestra gave a better rendition of this number than ever before and thereby won the complete approval of the largest audience of their experience. Deafening applause then greeted the appearance of Wilhelmi. The orchestra played the stirring introduction to the "Concerto Grosso" by Paganini, and when the master drew his bow across the strings of his violin, deep silence reigned, broken only at the conclusion of each component part by tremendous applause. The cantabile passages were especially enchanting. In response to the thunderous applause an encore was played.....

    After a brief intermission, during which the public strolled, socialized, and 3tried in various other ways to make themselves comfortable in the cold hall, the Orchestra presented the second part of the program, the "Iphigenia" Overture.

    Wilhelmi....played again and was again enthusiastically acclaimed....He chose the "Hungarian Songs" by Ernst....The enthusiasm was silenced only by the simultaneous appearance of the artist and Emil Dietzsch.

    Mr. Dietzsch turned toward Wilhelmi and said, My dear Mr. Wilhelmi, it is not without a purpose that you are here!

    "Certainly, anyone as capable as you in influencing human emotions, in stimulating mankind to noble thought and deeds, has a genuine claim to universal friendship, irrespective of creed or nationality; in this sense I greet you as a friend.

    "You are standing on historic ground. For years Chicago Germans have congregated here whenever it has become necessary to represent and defend their interests.

    4

    Many a movement was planned and brought to life here. In this hall we foster not only the convivial spirit of the Germans, but also German art, and therefore we feel highly indebted to you because you have done so much to enhance our casual Sunday diversions.....At the behest of the Chicago Orchestra I present to you this laurel wreath as a token of their reverence and esteem! When you have returned to your beloved native land across the sea, tell our countrymen that here, also, far from the storied fatherland, one finds Germans enraptured by art."

    The artist accepted the gift with evident surprise. He did not respond in words, but in Handel's "Largo" he expressed his gratitude. His violin sang with jubilation, and throughout the auditorium there were manifestations of joy and exaltation.....The number had to be repeated....before the applause would subside.

    This marked the end of Wilhelmi's participation in the concert, but the interest of the audience did not waver. Only a few persons left the uncomfortably cold hall. More than four fifths of the audience waited until the "March from Tannhauser" heralded the end of the program.....

    5

    Yesterday's concert undoubtedly succeeded in creating a host of friends for the Chicago Orchestra.

    Wilhelmi's repeated public appearances must be ascribed not only to his enterprising management but also to his exceptionally brilliant performances which always pave the way for future concerts.

    Today Wilhelmi is scheduled to appear in a concert in Milwaukee; tomorrow he intends to return to Chicago where he will stay until Friday, and where, according to his own words, he was accorded the most cordial reception in America.

    Yesterday afternoon, January 6, Wilhelmi gave his last Chicago concert for the season. Let us hope that he will return within the near future. It was a splendid idea to ...

    German
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Skandinaven -- January 07, 1879
    Verdens Gang (The Way of the World)

    The new newspaper Verdens Gang will be published here in Chicago. It will contain a great deal of interesting material such as the latest local news of interest to the Danish colony, as well as market reports.

    The new newspaper Verdens Gang will be published here in Chicago. It will contain a great deal of interesting material such as the latest local news of interest to the ...

    Danish
    II B 2 d 1
  • Skandinaven -- January 07, 1879
    Verdens Gang (The Way of the World)

    The new newspaper Verdens Gang will be published here in Chicago. It will contain a great deal of interesting material such as the latest local news of interest to the Danish colony, as well as market reports.

    The new newspaper Verdens Gang will be published here in Chicago. It will contain a great deal of interesting material such as the latest local news of interest to the ...

    Danish
    II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 08, 1879
    [Judicial Lakity] (Editorial)

    The miserable court procedure appears again in its crass reality as shown by the Court of Appeals in the City's suit against Gage's bondsmen. Because of a technical error which crept in when the application for bond was made, (that is, bond was not offered exactly within the prescribed period nor in acceptable form, and the city council not suspicious of anything, accepted the security), it now develops that Cage and his bondsman are to go Scot free, while a hundred thousand taxpayers will be condemned to pay a loss of $600,000. Very wise, ye noble and just judges:

    All that is missing now is an eulogistic comment on the part of our judicial leaders, in consideration of the fact that Gage did not take all the money which came into his possession. According to the Court's verdict, Gage was entitled to all of the money. Gage was not a city treasurer anymore, because he offered bond too late--missed by a few days. Consequently, he [Gage] was a plain citizen 2and if the City was so foolish as to entrust as to entrust him with its funds, then it would have been perfectly proper, if he had refused to return even a single cent.

    Verily, if one reads about such decisions, then one understands the attitude of the ancient Germans after the Heamann battle--when the tongues of Roman lawyers were split or perforated with glowing pins--and that, in modern times, "contempt of court become increasingly frequent.

    It appears if the courts actual seek public disdain.

    The miserable court procedure appears again in its crass reality as shown by the Court of Appeals in the City's suit against Gage's bondsmen. Because of a technical error which ...

    German
    I F 6, I F 5, II E 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 09, 1879
    "Thou Lovely Forest!" (Editorial)

    English newspapers give us the following estimates: We use annually 100,000 cords of wood--just for the wooden pegs in shoes; for matches, 300,000 cubic feet (2344 cords) of the best pinewood; for lasts and boot trees, 500,000 cords of birch, beech, and maple; and just as much for tool handles. To bake bricks, 2,000,000 cords of wood are needed every year, in other words, a forest of 50,000 acres. Our present telegraph poles represent 800,000 trees and the yearly maintenance exacts another 300,000. For railroad ties we require yearly the stripping of a thirty-year-old forest, an area of 75,000 acres, and to fence all railroads would involve a cost of $45,000,000 and an additional $15,000,000 for replacements.

    These few items show how we strip our forests; there are others: crates, boxes, baskets, etc., which represented, in 1874, an outlay of around $12,000,000; and the wood sold for agricultural implements, wagons, etc., amounted to $100,000,000.

    2

    These figures may be greatly exaggerated--in fact unbelievably so--but they furnish food for thought. "Who destroyed thee, lovely forest?" Our future generations will ask that question after being confronted by the wanton destruction practiced by the present inhabitants. We have followed a sacrilegious, ruthless process of devastation, even though we have eyes and ears to perceive how bitterly Europe and Asia fared, after felling their trees. The most fertile districts of the Old World were converted into deserts--consider Syria and "The Promised Land". In Southern France the cutting of forests on hill-sides invoked a constant, losing fight with the elements; water, formerly absorbed by vegetation, now rushes unchecked into valleys, bringing destruction in its wake and covering rich fields with sand and silt.

    All those examples are nonexistent, as far as Americans are concerned. What do they care about the future? Apres Lui Le Deluge (sic). Let the sons and grandchildren replant what has been so deliberately destroyed; and, in the interim, the present generation continues to regard the forests as an enemy which cannot be exterminated quickly enough. Even the most impressive warnings are insufficient to induce them to desist and consider the approaching calamity.

    English newspapers give us the following estimates: We use annually 100,000 cords of wood--just for the wooden pegs in shoes; for matches, 300,000 cubic feet (2344 cords) of the best ...

    German
    I H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 11, 1879
    State Taxation (Editorial)

    On the first page there is given a detailed account of Governor Cullon's proclamation to the legislature. [Translator's note: This document was written in English and translated into German by the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, and as it is available in the English-language papers, it is omitted here.]

    We derive some satisfaction in mentioning that the proposition first offered by the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, and later (somewhat hesitatingly) by one or another English paper, has now been adopted and announced as the Governor's policy: the abolition of all direct taxes, and the substitution of indirect levies (e.g. license taxes, trade, taxes, etc.). We have given our reasons [for advocating indirect taxes] on prior occasions in this column (editorial column), and we need not resort to repetition. It is sufficient to say that the procurement of state revenues through indirect means is the only orderly 2method whereby one may abolish universal cheating, which is a by-product of direct taxation.

    This will also spell finis to the insolent plundering of cities by the Equalization Board. As long as the Board exists, and this tax system [direct] prevails, which makes it apparent that the Board's creation is essential to justice (whereas it is actually the tool of despicable injustice), just so long will taxation in Illinois be based on perjury, fraud and swindle. After all, the State needs only very little money, so that every tax assessor may consider himself a public benefactor when he assesses all taxable property at as ludicrously a low figure as possible, thereby undermining the credit of the State.

    The State constitution provides, once and for all, that no community within the State shall go into debt beyond one twentieth (five per cent) of the value of all its taxable property. If such property then is assessed at one fourth or one fifth of its actual value, then it means that a community's credit is limited to one hundreth of its true taxable wealth. In this manner the present 3monstrous tax system of the State leads to artificial bankruptcy.

    To realize the abolition of this tax system is one of Governor Cullon's aims. Whether the State legislature will comprehend the matter shall not be commented upon. Not much can be expected from that source.

    On the first page there is given a detailed account of Governor Cullon's proclamation to the legislature. [Translator's note: This document was written in English and translated into German by ...

    German
    I H, II B 2 d 1