The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 05, 1878
    Lecture of Paul Grottkau

    Introduced by Mr. G. Bartels, the editor of the Berlin newspaper, Freie Presse, Mr. Paul Grottkau gave a lecture yesterday afternoon at the Vorwaerts Turner Hall on 12th Street. The subject of his lecture was, "The present situation in Germany and other civilized countries" from the socialistic standpoint.

    Introduced by Mr. G. Bartels, the editor of the Berlin newspaper, Freie Presse, Mr. Paul Grottkau gave a lecture yesterday afternoon at the Vorwaerts Turner Hall on 12th Street. The ...

    German
    I E, III H, II B 2 g, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 09, 1878
    A New German Women Society (Frauen Verein)

    The Germans and German-Americans of Chicago have noticed for quite a while that the German Aid Society is not able to master the unemployment situation and the urgent need among the poorer elements of the German settlement.

    Therefore a large group of prominent German women developed a plan to form a German Women's Society, which will have the purpose of cooperating with the old German Aid Society in handling all social work programs for assistance to needy German families and individuals.

    The first meeting of the group took place yesterday afternoon in the office of the German Aid Society and was presided over by Consul Heinrich Clausenius, who introduced Mr. Georg Schneider, president of the German Aid Society, as the first speaker. The latter explained in detail a new social aid program, whereupon the meeting adjourned until next Wednesday afternoon.

    The Germans and German-Americans of Chicago have noticed for quite a while that the German Aid Society is not able to master the unemployment situation and the urgent need among ...

    German
    II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 15, 1878
    Frauen Verein Der Deutschen Gesellschaft (The Ladies' Society of the German Aid Society)

    The German Women's Society of Chicago, which changed its name to Ladies' Association of the German Aid Society, held another meeting yesterday afternoon in the director's room at the office of the German Aid Society.

    Then a constitution of fourteen paragraphs, which had been worked out by a committee of five members, was read to the meeting and adopted by acclamation.

    The following permanent officers were elected:

    Mrs. Dr. Heffert, president

    Mrs. A. Butz, vice-president

    Mrs. E. Lassig, treasurer

    Mrs. Dr. Bluthardt, secretary

    Mrs. Dr. Matthei, organizer

    Mrs. Dr. Hotz, organizer

    Mrs. H. Claussenius, organizer

    Whereupon the meeting adjourned.

    The German Women's Society of Chicago, which changed its name to Ladies' Association of the German Aid Society, held another meeting yesterday afternoon in the director's room at the office ...

    German
    II D 10
  • Svenska Tribunen -- March 20, 1878
    The Swedish Nationality in America.

    Editor J.A.Enander gave a lecture last Wednesday in the Immanuel Church. His topic was: "The Swedish Nationality in America." Mr. Enander's lecture was very interesting. He predicted that the Swedish nationality in the United States was going to have a great influence upon the future life and progress of America. "The main thing for us Swedes," he said, "is not only to preserve and defend the manly Nordic character we have inherited from our forefathers, but also to adopt all the good we will find among our American brethren."

    Forty million inhabitants in this country are attentively observing us, watching us and the work we are doing for the good of this canny nation. Our duties are great and we have a responsibility both as citizens and as church members.

    Editor J.A.Enander gave a lecture last Wednesday in the Immanuel Church. His topic was: "The Swedish Nationality in America." Mr. Enander's lecture was very interesting. He predicted that the Swedish ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 g, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 26, 1878
    The German Language in the Public Schools a Statement

    To the Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung!

    March 26, 1878.

    The German language was taught in all primary and high schools of Chicago, instituted by the educational program of the Board of Education, until June 1876, when a decision of the same Board of Education left the teaching of German to the children, to the free will of the parents. In spite of this decision the number of pupils of German learning was 2098 in June of last year, and rose in March of this year to 2193 pupils.

    We owe this result to the untiring efforts of the Committee for German Instruction, which had to fight a powerful propaganda of English-American newspapers which were against the teaching of foreign languages, particularly German. It is up to the alertness of all Germans and German-Americans to fight for the German mother tongue and support the hard task of the German Committee (for German instruction) in every direction.

    Signed: Ernst Prussing

    To the Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung! March 26, 1878. The German language was taught in all primary and high schools of Chicago, instituted by the educational program of the ...

    German
    I A 1 b
  • Skandinaven -- April 02, 1878
    [Turner Union Formed]

    The Scandinavian Turner Brothers is the name of a new union which has lately started its work. Messrs. Smith and Wingood are the leaders and organizers of this new undertaking. Already it has fifty active members but there is a big chance that it will grow very rapidly. Their meeting place is in Aurora Turner Hall. Last Monday was the first time the members practiced.

    The Scandinavian Turner Brothers is the name of a new union which has lately started its work. Messrs. Smith and Wingood are the leaders and organizers of this new undertaking. ...

    Norwegian
    II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 05, 1878
    Society of German Physicians

    The physicians of the discontinued German American Dispensary held a meeting on the 20th of last month for the purpose of reorganizing this institute. Dr. Schaller, presiding over the meeting, introduced Dr. Matthei, who explained how the Dispensary had to be closed for lack of interest on the part of the German population. The newly founded Society of German Physicians should have in every ward of the City one of the members of this society installed as ward physician to take care of needy German patients, recommended by the German Aid Society. The latter has declared its willingness to provide free of charge any needed quantity of drugs, medical and surgical instruments. This generous offer of the German Society will made it possible to begin at once with the formation of the new Society.

    Dr. I. Cohn thentook the chair and announced that the new Society will have a meeting every month, for which the date and location would be told in circular 2letters, sent to all members and to the press. A constitution for the new Society will be read at the next meeting.

    The physicians of the discontinued German American Dispensary held a meeting on the 20th of last month for the purpose of reorganizing this institute. Dr. Schaller, presiding over the meeting, ...

    German
    II A 1, II D 10, II D 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 20, 1878
    The Business Situation of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung.

    The Editor of the Freie Presse (Free Press) has been brought to court by one attorney for spreading the rumor that one newspaper is nearing a state of bankruptcy.

    The Illinois Staats-Zeitung was forced after the great Chicago Fire to build its own establishment and therewith, like so many concerns, had to borrow money at 10% interest from a Chicago Bank.

    The excellent business standing of our newspaper has been used by our lawyer as a sound and fundamental argument, to obtain for us a lower interest for our debt through some acceptable transaction.

    One lawyer's various negotiations with banks doubtless leaked out and tempted the Freie Presse to suspect a weak standing of our financial capability. As a fact our business affairs never have been more prosperous thanright now, and we are expecting a steady expansion of our circulation. Based on this 2favorable state of affairs, we have finally succeeded in stablizing our debt on sound bonds at 8% interest. This favorable transaction in conjunction with our bank has naturally increased and solidified our credit and expansion capacity.

    The payment of our bills, salaries and running expenses has not stopped a minute during the described transaction. This fact has been completely ignored in these mentioned rumors, which we are clearing now in court.

    In the meantime we call our readers' attention to the fact that the Illinois Staats-Zeitung has the largest circulation of all German newspapers west of the Allegheny Mountains.

    The Editor of the Freie Presse (Free Press) has been brought to court by one attorney for spreading the rumor that one newspaper is nearing a state of bankruptcy. The ...

    German
    II B 2 d 1
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 22, 1878
    The German Drama

    Because Mr. Worster's German theatre at the New Chicago was not as well patronized during this season as in former seasons, it was decided that the Germans of the city would and could not support a first-class German theatre permanently. Such, however, is not a fact. Chicago contains a large German population, as large as many German capitols supporting first-class theatres and theatre goers who visit the theatre at least once a week. They prefer good performances given in their mothertongue, provided such performances are as good as those given in the English theatres. The success that Mr. Wurster achieved during the two seasons previous to this one, proves the assertion. The companies he has then, were good ones, and each role was in the hands of a capable actor, which resulted in good ensemoles, and performances that gave satisfaction. The Germans are well educated, critical people and they know the difference between good and bad performances. They do not care to see plays where the principal parts are performed by brilliant actors, and the minor parts put in the hands of amateurs, but want to see every part, no matter how small, performed in an acceptable manner.

    Because Mr. Worster's German theatre at the New Chicago was not as well patronized during this season as in former seasons, it was decided that the Germans of the city ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 28, 1878
    The Scandinavians

    To the Editor of the Chicago Tribune: April 27. In nearly every report concerning the Communistic movement in this city it is made apparent that the Scandinavians are the leading element. That no one has taken up the pen to rectify this error is probably because the Scandinavians themselves are aware of the insignificent part their communist countrymen are playing in reality, and for this reason the articles have been considered too riduculous for attention, however aggrevating. Nevertheless this silence on their part may result in the idea gaining ground that the Scandinavians as a class are communistic, and to be ranked among the scum of society. It is therefore for the interest of the Scandinavian majority, and for the sake of justice to make known to the American people how very few Scandinavians are in sympathy with the communistic movement.

    To the Editor of the Chicago Tribune: April 27. In nearly every report concerning the Communistic movement in this city it is made apparent that the Scandinavians are the leading ...

    Norwegian
    I E