The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 02, 1878
    The National German-American Seminary

    To the Editor!

    If Mr. Bernays would not be known as a truth-loving, honest-thinking man, his article published in this newspaper last Saturday could make us believe, that he wants to be highly intelligent at any price. Seemingly, following this urge, he does not show any respect for any ideal agitations and human achievements.

    As a fact, Mr. Bernays is known to us as a sober thinking, righteous and sensible head, and just for this reason we deem it necessary to bring all facts, as cited and doubtless unintentionally distorted by Mr. Bernays, in the right light of logical discussion.

    Apparently Mr. Bernays did not know that the Seminary Society has already funds of $20,000. Otherwise he certainly would not write that there is not more than $10,000 on paper.

    2

    Also Mr. Bernays could not have known, that the Seminary project took shape and form only three years ago. Otherwise he would have hesitated to call this fine project an affair of graft dragging along during the last five years.

    There is now already a sufficient number of Seminary foundation societies in existence, which guarantee every year an income of about $4,000 for the Seminary.

    Also Mr. Bernays obviously was unaware of the fact that an institution which owns a stock of apparatus, books and financial assets of altogether $80,000 has offered its building, material and money for immediate use to the new Seminary. And still, Mr. Bernays dared to write that the Seminary plan is still on the same spot on which it was in the beginning.

    We are convinced that Mr. Bernays did not take his time to be informed 3sufficiently on this subject, before he wrote down his opinion.

    As is the situation today, the German-Americans of this country will strain every nerve to make the National German-American Seminary a success. The same will be opened on September 1st, 1878.

    Signed:

    W. N. Hailmann

    To the Editor! If Mr. Bernays would not be known as a truth-loving, honest-thinking man, his article published in this newspaper last Saturday could make us believe, that he wants ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III A, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 08, 1878
    The German Teachers' Seminary

    I have read Mr. Hailmann's answer to my recent article in this newspaper concerning the German Teachers' Seminary, which Mr. Hailmann is calling the National German-American Seminary. To defend myself, I must mention that all information pertaining to my statements was given to me from several active sponsors of the project. There might have been a misunderstanding in regard to the fund of $10,000 - which (possibly includes all collections in St. Louis) might have reached by now the figure of $20,000. To get a clear picture on this subject, it must be understood in the first place, that there is a fair difference between donations on the paper and cash gifts or cash collections.

    We all know that many magnificent plans of German conservatories and Germanistic institutes have collapsed in the very beginning through mismanagement and dishonesty. These failures of the past have left an atmosphere of distrust, for which I cannot apologize, as long as the project of the National German-American Seminary does not show a more substantial progress.

    2

    I am admiring the perseverance and truly German ideals which have been the underlying forces towards the realization of the project.

    I hope I have been mistaken with my statements, published recently, and I sincerely wish that all generous sponsors of the Teachers' Seminary will be successful in their efforts to see the plan carried out. The organizing of the Seminary in September will be the best reward for the confidence, which so far has been shown by the Germans of America.

    Signed: E. L. Bernays

    I have read Mr. Hailmann's answer to my recent article in this newspaper concerning the German Teachers' Seminary, which Mr. Hailmann is calling the National German-American Seminary. To defend myself, ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III A, III B 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 16, 1878
    Swedish Theater.

    A presentation of "Rika Morbror" (Wealthy Uncle) will be given by a Swedish Theatrical company at the North Side Turner Hall Sunday, January 27th, together with another farce, "En Svartsjuk Tok"(A Jealous Fool). Mr. P.W.Nilson is the director, and he has promised that there will be both good stage decorations and costumes. We do hope our readers will not miss the opportunity to enjoy a happy evening, as the tickets for admission are very reasonable, and such good entertainment is very seldom offered to our countrymen in Chicago.

    A presentation of "Rika Morbror" (Wealthy Uncle) will be given by a Swedish Theatrical company at the North Side Turner Hall Sunday, January 27th, together with another farce, "En Svartsjuk ...

    Swedish
    II A 3 d 1
  • Skandinaven -- January 22, 1878
    [Seek Aid for Fire Victims]

    Nora Lodge I.R.H.K., held a meeting last Tuesday evening and resolved to collect as much as possible to help our people in the town of Levanger Norway, which was nearly burned to the ground on the 12th of December, 1877. A committee was appointed to get the collection started. Remember Norway helped us in 1870, let us get busy.

    Nora Lodge I.R.H.K., held a meeting last Tuesday evening and resolved to collect as much as possible to help our people in the town of Levanger Norway, which was nearly ...

    Norwegian
    II D 10, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 22, 1878
    The Colonization Society

    It might interest our readers to know that recently a Colonization Aid Society has been founded. According to a statement, sent to us from this society, the purpose of the latter is to give any Germans, who become members of the society and are willing to farm, an opportunity to buy a homestead with really good soil, on an instalment plan.

    The members of this Aid Society are paying monthly dues, but otherwise the Society is working out a finance plan in conjunction with a bank, whereby large tracts of land can be bought and the subdivided areas be sold to the interested members of the Society.

    At this very moment, a land commission of this society is travelling now in North Alabama to look over some farmland near Cullinan City, Alabama.

    The Executive Committee of the Society consists of the following gentlemen:

    2

    Carl Brandt, 621 North Ashland Avenue

    G. M. Lott, 70 North Sangamon Street

    Charles Hoya, 536 North LaSalle Street

    who made the announcement, that meetings of the members are on the first and third Mondays of every month, at 8 P:M, 7 South Clark Street.

    It might interest our readers to know that recently a Colonization Aid Society has been founded. According to a statement, sent to us from this society, the purpose of the ...

    German
    III G, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 23, 1878
    How the Presbyterian Church Is Trying to Spread its Faith Among Germans.

    For almost five years a small German Presbyterian congregation has been in existence, which apparently is facing a hard struggle at present, as the powerful Fourth Presbyterian Church, Superior and Rush Streets, is preparing to take the church building away from the said small German congregation.

    In order to understand the origin of this dispute, we have to go back to the year 1866, when students of the Presbyterian Seminary opened up a Sunday School on Orchard Street, which was visited mainly by children of the German residents in that neighborhood. The Sunday School flourished and finally received from Mr. Wesley Munger and his wife several lots with an adjoining building as a donation, with the written condition, that the said property should be used for the foundation of an independent German Presbyterian Church. This was accomplished under the guidance of the German pastor C. Wisner.

    In 1874, the Fourth Presbyterian Church started to force pastor, C. Wisner, to preach in English, which policy was refused repeatedly by the small German 2congregation, Finally, pastor C. Wisner resigned, and the church service was led for almost two years by church elders and visiting preachers. In 1876 the Fourth Presbyterian Church installed A. Hager as pastor of the German Presbyterian Congregation and instructed him to preach in English. Again violent opposition on the part of the German Congregation set in. Angered by this attitude, the Fourth Presbyterian Church took the case to court and affected a decision, which gave the right to the Fourth Presbyterian Church to take over all property of the small German Congregation. The latter is fighting the decision through new court proceedings.

    For almost five years a small German Presbyterian congregation has been in existence, which apparently is facing a hard struggle at present, as the powerful Fourth Presbyterian Church, Superior and ...

    German
    III C, I C, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 28, 1878
    The Labor Party (Arbeiter Partei) of the United States

    For a long time there have been signs of a split in the Labor Party pertaining to its socialistic, communistic and more conservative elements. The Ultra-Socialists of the Party, mostly Germans, want the name of the Labor Party changed to Socialist Labor Party. The less radical elements of the Party do not agree with this and called a meeting yesterday at the City Hall after the session of the city council. This meeting was presided over by Mr. A. W. Herr, who introduced Mr. W. V. Barr as speaker of the day.

    Mr. Barr gave a short history of the Labor Party and explained why all achievements of the Labor Party should be accomplished with the exclusion of radical elements.

    Thereupon the meeting voted by a large majority to keep the old name "Labor Party" and set up the following aims as a new program:

    2

    1.The acceptation of an eight hour work day for any kind of work, except farm work.

    2.The elimination of convict work in any trade, and the use of convicts in public maintenance work only.

    3.The abolition of the conspiracy laws, which mark the worker a criminal, because he is trying to protect his only property, the job - while the capitalists are at liberty to raise the prices of food etc and to cut down the wages of labor.

    4.The recall of vagrancy laws, which make poverty a crime.

    5.The sanction of all laws by the nation's referendum before their ratification.

    6.The abolition of child labor under the age of fourteen in any industry or factory.

    3

    7. The elimination of private street car companies and confiscation of their lines, as soon as they violate the concession rules, and the introduction of a three cent street car fare under city management.

    8. The purchase of all gas plants on a reasonably low estimation, or the construction of new city owned gas plants. The maximum of $1.50 per 1,000 feet for the consumers.

    9. The abolition of the contract system for all public work, direct payment and supervision of all pertaining labor through city employees and a time schedule of eight hours per day.

    10. The abrogation of all national banks and their replacement by Federal Banks, the notes of which always could be exchanged for currency in gold or silver.

    The program, as outlined above, was adopted through acclamation by the meeting, which then adjourned in an orderly fashion.

    For a long time there have been signs of a split in the Labor Party pertaining to its socialistic, communistic and more conservative elements. The Ultra-Socialists of the Party, mostly ...

    German
    I E, I H, I F 3, II B 2 g
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 29, 1878
    John A. Huck, Dead

    When coming home from work last night shortly before 1 o'clock, John A. huck collapsed suddenly at the door of his house and died on the spot. The news of his death spread like wild fire all over Chicago, which has known Mr. Huck some years as a respectable, jovial German and good American citizen.

    John A. Huck was born on May 15, 1819 at St. Einbach (Germany), learned there the brewery business and came in 1845 to America, where he was holding positions as brewmaster successively in New York and Kingston (Canada). In 1846 he settled down in Chicago and with his savings founded there the Huck's Brewery, which gradually became famous all over the country for its fine products. The great Chicago Fire of 1871 also destroyed Huck's Brewery, causing a financial setback, from which John A. Huck only slowly recovered.

    John A. Huck was a member of several German Lodges and has been active in 2cooperative efforts to found the Teutonia Life Insurance Company and the German National Bank.

    John A. Huck is survived by his wfie, two daughters and one son. The latter, Louis Huck, is well known and was a business partner of his father.

    When coming home from work last night shortly before 1 o'clock, John A. huck collapsed suddenly at the door of his house and died on the spot. The news of ...

    German
    IV, II A 2
  • Hejmdal -- January 29, 1878
    (No headline)

    Freja's Concert on the 26th day of December was a great success. Twelve hundred people were present, and all complimented the singers. Miss Emma Larsen was excellent as the soloist.

    After the concert there was a ball lasting until dawn.

    Freja's Concert on the 26th day of December was a great success. Twelve hundred people were present, and all complimented the singers. Miss Emma Larsen was excellent as the soloist. ...

    Danish
    II A 3 b
  • Hejmdal -- January 29, 1878
    (No headline)

    Freja's Concert on the 26th day of December was a great success. Twelve hundred people were present, and all complimented the singers. Miss Emma Larsen was excellent as the soloist.

    After the concert there was a ball lasting until dawn.

    Freja's Concert on the 26th day of December was a great success. Twelve hundred people were present, and all complimented the singers. Miss Emma Larsen was excellent as the soloist. ...

    Danish
    II A 3 b