The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 01, 1877
    The Fiftieth Anniversary of a Physician

    Dr. Fessel celebrated the day before yesterday his fiftieth jubilee as physician. To the sorrow of his friends and especially to his colleagues Dr. Fessel has just recently moved to New York. The physician enjoyed in Europe already great esteem where he worked himself up to the position of a member of the Board of Health. Wherever he was known in America, Milwaukee, New York, and here, he was considered as one of the foremost in the medical profession and was consulted by almost all of his German colleagues in any difficult and complicated case: Notwithstanding the successful but strenuous activities as physician, he always, found time for fostering and promoting music, and many a Society is indebted to him for its existence as for instance the Philharmonic Society in Milwaukee which at the time of his residence there and under the management of Hans Balatka, Dr. Fessel's son-inlaw, reached its climax. His Chicago friends expressed their participation at this jubilee, by sending Dr. Fessel a letter of hearty congratulations and a valuable gift.

    Dr. Fessel celebrated the day before yesterday his fiftieth jubilee as physician. To the sorrow of his friends and especially to his colleagues Dr. Fessel has just recently moved to ...

    German
    IV, II A 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 09, 1877
    To the Director of the New Chicago Theater, Mr. Alexander Wurster:

    We, the undersigned, who have attended with pleasure the representations in your theater, are sorry to learn that due to unfortunate circumstances the attendance in your theater has diminished to such an extent, that you have sustained severe financial losses. We hope that these detrimental influences will soon disappear and that on Sundays your theater will be filled once more as usual.

    With satisfaction we look back upon your artistic performances, which even the English press said were superior to similar presentations in English theaters, and which were, at the same time, "rendezvous" for the better class of Germans. In order to compensate you for the losses sustained during these last weeks, we offer you a complimentary presentation on Jan. 14, and we hope that we shall get the support of all the art-loving Germans of Chicago.

    Chicago, January 8, 1877

    (Signed by 14 prominent Germans).

    We, the undersigned, who have attended with pleasure the representations in your theater, are sorry to learn that due to unfortunate circumstances the attendance in your theater has diminished to ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 09, 1877
    Annette Essipoff

    Artists who are not preceded by their fame, gerecrally find themselves in a difficult position toward the public. They must at first captivate their audience. Mastery of instruments is not any longer rare today, and the public must be convinced that the artist is a master before it is willing to hear him.

    It is not surprising under surprising those circumstances, that the concert given last night in the now Chicago theater, by the Russian pianist, Mme. Annette Essipoff, did not draw a large crowd, but there were a great number of piano teachers in the audience.

    Mme. Annette Essipoff is an excellent pianist and is certainly not inferior to Alice Topp or Anna Heslig. She played to perfection the Andante and the Impromptu from: "Rose wade" by Schubert, as well as Schumanns's "Traumeswirren" and "Les doux Alouettes", a composition by her husband, Director of the St. Petersburg Conservatory of Music.

    The public awaited with special interest her interprotation of Chapin. Her requtation to be the best interpreter of this composer does not seem to us to be justified. Her playing lacks the necessary power to render the stormy ideas of Chopin.

    2

    Mrs. Essipoff lived up to the expectations of her audience. The only thing lacking seemed to be power, and this was perhaps due to the almost empty hall.

    Artists who are not preceded by their fame, gerecrally find themselves in a difficult position toward the public. They must at first captivate their audience. Mastery of instruments is not ...

    Russian
    III H, II B 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 13, 1877
    A Free Mason Letter.

    The local Waldeck lodge has sent a circular to its German sister lodges. It says among other things: "What we want is the improvement of humanity, based on science morality and art. This is the trinity in which we believe. This is the religion which some say will become the religion of the world. No philosophical system nor church dogma has ever been more simple. But the word must be translated into action.

    "Guided by this conviction, we have made the attempt to found a free drawing school. We note with joy that this attempt has been crowned with success. The Waldeck drawing school has now been in existence one year, and is attended regularly by almost 100 students. We hope that some day it will become a true cultural institution for our young people."

    The school is in Kemmler's hall, corner of S. Clark and 18th St. The Waldeck lodge has been in existence since Jan. 30, 1871.

    The local Waldeck lodge has sent a circular to its German sister lodges. It says among other things: "What we want is the improvement of humanity, based on science morality ...

    German
    II B 2 f, II D 1, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 16, 1877
    Italian Slave Dealers

    The shameful trade in Italian children, a practice which has already been revealed in several cities and prosecuted more than once, has also come to light here. Emmanuel Mallelo an Italian living at 527 S. Clark Street, was subjected to a severe grilling in the South Side Police Station for alleged slave dealing in Italian children. Here is what happened: A little boy unable to speak English, freezing and crying, was met by a policeman, who brought him to an Italian man to help as an interpreter. The child said that his father had rented him out to Mallelo for $25 a year. He was forced to walk daily through the streets with a harp on his back and to play music. The money thus collected he had to give to his cruel master in the evening. It fared bad with him every time he did not hand over a certain minimum amount to his torturer. He was then beaten, received nothing to eat and forced out again into the dark night to complete the required sum. If he was again unsuccessful, he had to look for another shelter or sleep in the open.

    2

    The court proceedings revealed that Mallelo was keeping eight boys in similar bondage. He gave the boys shelter and food for one dollar a week. Investigations are continuing. It is to be hoped that charitable people will be found to take care of the little Italian slaves.

    The shameful trade in Italian children, a practice which has already been revealed in several cities and prosecuted more than once, has also come to light here. Emmanuel Mallelo an ...

    Italian
    II E 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 16, 1877
    Italian Slave Dealers

    The shameful trade in Italian children which has already made its appearance in several cities and been prosecuted more than once has also come to light here. Emmanuel Mallelo, an Italian, living at 527 S. Clark St. was subjected to a severe grilling in the Southside police station for alleged Slave dealing in Italian children. Here is what happened: A little boy, unable to speak English, was met by a policeman freezing and crying. The friendly night policeman brought the boy to an Italian man, to help out as interpreter. The little one told, that his father had rented him out to Mallelo for twenty-five dollars a year. For that he was obliged to walk daily through the streets with his harp on his back and play music. The money thus collected he had to give to his cruel master in the evening. It was too bad for him if he did not hand over a minimum amount to his torturer. He was then beaten and received nothing to eat. Often he was sent out again into the dark night to complete the sum. If he was again unsuccessful he had to look for another shelter or sleep in the open.

    2

    The court proceeding revealed that Mallelo was keeping eight boys in similar bondage. He gave the boys shelter and food for one dollar a week. Investigations are continuing. It is to be hoped that charitable people will be found to take care of the little Italian slave.

    The shameful trade in Italian children which has already made its appearance in several cities and been prosecuted more than once has also come to light here. Emmanuel Mallelo, an ...

    Italian
    II E 1, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 18, 1877
    A Big Bankruptcy

    The important firm of the Bros. Schonfeldt declared itself yesterday insolvent. This will be much of a surprise to the northsiders as they have witnessed just a few weeks ago the opening of this exquisite store which moved from its old location on Indiana Street to its beautiful new place in Brand's Hall. The firm was supposed to be in financial difficulties ever since the big fire. Messrs. Jacob and Benjamin S. Schonfeldt are the victims of that great tragedy. With a capital of only $5,000 they began anew, and with a good credit extended to them, they transacted a business of about $300,000 to $400,000 annually.

    The important firm of the Bros. Schonfeldt declared itself yesterday insolvent. This will be much of a surprise to the northsiders as they have witnessed just a few weeks ago ...

    German
    II A 2
  • Der Westen -- January 28, 1877
    Professor Wiedinger Opens New School

    Professor Wiedinger, the well known educator will open next week a German and English select school at 533 N. Clark St. The new institution will teach several subjects of a higher school. The very able teacher Mrs. Wiedinger will be connected with the new school. The languages used in the teaching of the subjects will be German and English. Mr. Wiedingers' ability as an educator is so well known by the older German generation of the city, that he should not lack students. We consider it our duty to call this new school to the attention of the parents and we wish to recommend it.

    Professor Wiedinger, the well known educator will open next week a German and English select school at 533 N. Clark St. The new institution will teach several subjects of a ...

    German
    I A 2 a
  • Der Westen -- January 28, 1877
    (No headline)

    Professor Wiedinger, the well-known educator, will open next week a German-English school at 533 N. Clark Street. The new institution will teach several high school subjects, and it will be under the direction of Professor Wiedinger himself. The subjects offered will be taught in either German or English.

    Mr. Wiedinger's reputation as an educator is so well known by the older German generation of the city that he will have no difficulty in attracting a great number of students. We consider it our duty to call the attention of the parents to this new school, which we heartily recommend.

    Professor Wiedinger, the well-known educator, will open next week a German-English school at 533 N. Clark Street. The new institution will teach several high school subjects, and it will be ...

    German
    II B 2 f, I A 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 30, 1877
    [Scandinavians Honor Thomas Payne]

    The Scandinavian Free Thinkers' Club celebrated last night in the Aurora Turner Hall, the 140th anniversary of the birth of Thomas Payne, the famous American Free Thinker. The proscenium and the gallery of the hall were richly adorned with American, Swedish, Norwegian and Danish flags. There were also pictures representing the burning at stake of Servatius and of Payne explaining to a farmer "the age of reason, while a priest is taking away his corn and sheep for tithes. Dr. Pacts made a speech in Danish language and after him Capt. John Johnson said a few words. A concert and a dance closed the celebration.

    The Scandinavian Free Thinkers' Club celebrated last night in the Aurora Turner Hall, the 140th anniversary of the birth of Thomas Payne, the famous American Free Thinker. The proscenium and ...

    Swedish
    III C, II B 1 c 3