The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- January 27, 1876
    Whisky Indictment against Hesing, Rehm, Hoyt, Mintz and Others.

    Mr. Hesing's first indictment required $50,000 bail and the latter two, $10,000 each making a total of $70,000 bail. The first indictment charges Hesing as conspiring with Rehm, the second with conspiring with August Newhaus, a storekeeper at the Lake Shore Distillery, and the third is against Hesing, himself as a distiller, the charge being simply that of conspiracy to defraud the Government of the Internal Revenue Tax.

    Mr. A. C. Hesing was visited at his residence last evening by a Tribune reporter, whose mission was to interrogate him in regard to the indictments found against him by the Grand Jury. Mr. Hesing stated that he had necessarily felt much annoyed at what he regarded as causeless persecution on the part of the Government, but he was confident of a triumphant acquittal if an unprejudiced jury could be obtained.

    2

    He had no idea on what the charges against him were based. He had never been inside of a distillery but once, and knew nothing of crooked whisky. He did not see how he could be justly accused of conspiracy; as his influence with the Government had always been exceedingly slight, and very little good it would do for him to conspire. In regard to the trial, Mr. Hesing said that he had engaged Mr. Edmund Juessen as his attorney, and he would enter a plea of not guilty. Mr. Hesing will be on hand this morning to give bail.

    The indictment against Rehm is simply that of conspiracy with Hesing, and the bail was fixed at $50,000.

    Mr. Hesing's first indictment required $50,000 bail and the latter two, $10,000 each making a total of $70,000 bail. The first indictment charges Hesing as conspiring with Rehm, the second ...

    German
    II E 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 27, 1876
    The German Army Band.

    The German Army Band gave its first concert last night at the North Side Turn Hall. The band which came to America last October has since toured the Eastern States with great success. The public's unanimous opinion was, that Chicago was never before visited by as excellent a band as this one.

    The concert commenced with the Coronation-march from the Prophet. It continued with the overture to Oberon, Girofle-Girofla and many solo pieces. The "Shepherd's Sunday Song" and "The Chapel" are two compositions of great simplicity depending entirely for its success on the artists rendition of it.

    The German Army Band gave its first concert last night at the North Side Turn Hall. The band which came to America last October has since toured the Eastern States ...

    German
    III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 27, 1876
    Appreciation of America in Germany

    Die Volks Zeitung, ( the people's newspaper) of Berlin disapproved of the attacks upon Americans that have been occasioned by the dynamite outrage. "This is regrettable. In everyday contact with other nations we were unpresumptuous and discreet, but since our war victory, other nations are being looked down upon, reserving the nobility of virtue for itself, trying to pin all the outrages on to non-Germans. This is to be considered as youthful pranks of a politically reborn nation and therefore has to be forgiven."

    The article said further:... "We consider it as good fortune that no suspicion fell on the much discussed Thomas as being a Frenchman! Happily, he is a Protestant; were he a Catholic no doubt that there would be plenty of fanatics who would accuse religion for this atrocious act. Our American guests can gather from this circumstance that there is no suspicion cast against American but a parade of a sickly enthusiasm of self virtue harmful to all the world, meaning in this instance to morally disbelieve in the virtue of others."

    2

    We hope that this will be sufficient to calm our American guests if their feelings were hurt adding, that we have cause to regret that the same custom does not prevail in Germany as is the case in England and America, by which a catastrophe like that in Bremen would have been corrected officially...

    Die Volks Zeitung, ( the people's newspaper) of Berlin disapproved of the attacks upon Americans that have been occasioned by the dynamite outrage. "This is regrettable. In everyday contact with ...

    German
    III H, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 28, 1876
    The Whiskey War.

    A. C. Hesing yesterday appeared in federal court. Three accusations were made against him. The first and principal one is against J. Rehm, A. C. Hesing, and J. F. Hoyt and covers not less than forty pages. Stripped of its legal terminology, the accusation can be summarized as follows: That on February 2, 1873, Jacob Rehm, A. C. Hesing and J. F. Hoyt with G. Miller, H. Fredericks and many others entered into a conspiracy to place 1,000,000 gallons of untaxed brandy on the market. That between January 1 and February 7, 1873, 110,000 of these gallons actually appeared on the market.

    2

    The second accusation stipulates that A. C. Hesing and other persons had conspired on February 2, 1874 to cheat the Federal Government out of a seventy cents tax on a million gallons of brandy to be made in the distilleries of Lake Shore in Chicago and of Union Copper in Calumet.

    The third accusation states that on June 1, 1874, A. C. Hesing, Miller, and Fredericks conspired to put 100,000 gallons of untaxed whiskey from Lake Shore distillery on the market.

    For the first indictment against Rehm, Hesing, and Hoyt, the federal prosecuting attorney requested from each one of the accused $50,000 bond; for the second indictment against Hesing alone $50,000 bond; 3no new sentence for the third indictment against Hesing and Neuhaus, $10,000 bond.

    The total bond of A. C. Hesing thus ran up to $110,000. Upon the request of the attorney for the defense, Judge Blodgett put the bond for A. C. Hesing at $30,000, for Rehm at $30,000, and for Hoyt at $20,000. Tuesday was then chosen as the day on which the accused would have to plead guilty or not guilty to the indictment. J.Rehm put up bond through Julius Jonas and A. Loeb, A. C. Hesing through H. Raster, C. F. Pietsch, and Washington Hesing.

    Needless to say, the indictments against A. C. Hesing and J. Rehm were the talk of the city yesterday.

    A. C. Hesing yesterday appeared in federal court. Three accusations were made against him. The first and principal one is against J. Rehm, A. C. Hesing, and J. F. Hoyt ...

    German
    II E 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 28, 1876
    [Hans Von Buelow to Give Concerts]

    The concerts of the famous piano artist, Hans Von Bulow, will begin next Monday in McCormick's Hall. The program of the first concert will be compositions by Bach, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Spohr, Rubinstein, Gomez, and Liszt. The singer, Miss Cronyn, who will appear at the concerts, is an eighteen-year old lady from Buffalo, the daughter of a physician. She has a pleasant voice and is an able artist.

    The concerts of the famous piano artist, Hans Von Bulow, will begin next Monday in McCormick's Hall. The program of the first concert will be compositions by Bach, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, ...

    German
    II A 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 28, 1876
    [The Activities of the German Literary Association]

    The German Literary Association of the Chicago Atheneum gave a presentation yesterday in its building of "The Diplomat", by Scribe and Delavigne. The actors were Americans who had taken lessons in German. In a short time they have made much progress. Although their pronunciation betrayed several of them, their fluent expression was excellent. Mr. Ullmann and Miss Bushnell deserve special praise. This is the first attempt made by Americans and the results were most satisfactory. Special recognition is due to Mr. Groh, teacher of the German language who gave the impetus to this presentation.

    The German Literary Association of the Chicago Atheneum gave a presentation yesterday in its building of "The Diplomat", by Scribe and Delavigne. The actors were Americans who had taken lessons ...

    German
    II B 1 c 1, II B 1 e, III B 2, I A 1 b, I C
  • Der Westen -- February 06, 1876
    Mr. Von BÜLow's Fourth Concert.

    The audience at yesterday afternoon's concert witnessed an unexpected sensation. Mr. Von Bülow revealed not only his art as a pianist, but also his nature as a man, unafraid of being rude and vulgar. Shortly after 2 o'clock he appeared at the piano and asked the audience for permission to make a few remarks. He first thanked the Americans for their wonderful reception, but added that he could not say the same about his compatriots, the "Dutch" (Mr. Bülow's own expression). They had criticized his program because it was too classical and had advised him to play, rather, "Home, Sweet Home", "Last Rose of Summer" or "Yankee Doodle". He thanked them for the suggestions and said that he would comply with it. He thereupon played the Marseillaise with great fury, as if he had been the avenging Gallic nation.

    The audience at yesterday afternoon's concert witnessed an unexpected sensation. Mr. Von Bülow revealed not only his art as a pianist, but also his nature as a man, unafraid of ...

    German
    II B 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 07, 1876
    "Delusions of Grandeur."

    The pianist, Hans Von Bulow, has revelled in some impertinence before leaving Chicago. In very poor English he ridiculed the "Dutch". To give to his scorn a musical accompaniment, he then played the Marseillaise. He also published in the Times the Germanophobe English newspaper, a series of opinions concerning the Germans in America, opinions which are so insulting that the only possible answer should be directed to the seat of his pants.

    In his favor must be said that he is not responsible, but suffers from delusions of grandeur. By speaking with contempt of the "Dutch", he remains faithful to his past.

    2

    He is one of those German deserters, who licked the boots of the French Emperor. There is no fatherland for the confessors of the Wagner religion. He would never have dared to play the Marseillaise at the time that he a was a boot-licker of Louis Napoleon. That might have been dangerous.

    The pianist, Hans Von Bulow, has revelled in some impertinence before leaving Chicago. In very poor English he ridiculed the "Dutch". To give to his scorn a musical accompaniment, he ...

    German
    I C, II A 3 b
  • Hejmdal -- February 12, 1876
    [Play Successful]

    The performance last Sunday of the play "Three for One," at the Morskabs Theater, was a great success. M. Scheel's acting was excellent.

    The performance last Sunday of the play "Three for One," at the Morskabs Theater, was a great success. M. Scheel's acting was excellent.

    Danish
    II B 1 c 1
  • Hejmdal -- February 12, 1876
    [Play Successful]

    The performance last Sunday of the play "Three for One," at the Morskabs Theater, was a great success. M. Scheel's acting was excellent.

    The performance last Sunday of the play "Three for One," at the Morskabs Theater, was a great success. M. Scheel's acting was excellent.

    Danish
    II B 1 c 1