The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 26, 1874
    [Prominent Dane Dies]

    Hofman-Schmidth, who became well known to the Germans during the last election campaign, died in Chicago yesterday morning from a kidney ailment.

    Niels Axel de Hofman-Schmidth belonged to an old noble family which had emigrated a long time ago from Russia to Jutland. He was born in 1935. His father was a preacher at Aarkus. He was sent to the Latin School in Copenhagen and later attended the university there. He was famous for his philological knowledge and was considered an authority in Greek. In 1857 he married a Miss Kemo and became a farmer. He managed the Hanjbergkovagard estate, which, because of financial reverses, he had to give up in 1858. In 1861 he joined the army; he took part in the war of 1864 against Germany.

    In the interval he wrote for the Copenhagen newspapers Fadrelandet Denmark and Dagbladet. Later he became editor of the paper Pjerrot, and a writer for the Svarmere.

    2

    The year 1866 brought him to America. The first three years he remained in New York. In 1869 he came to Chicago as editor of Fremad. The 1871 fire drove him back to the East, but he soon returned. When the Great Movement started, he sided with the Liberals and founded the Frikeden, a good paper, much read by the Scandinavians.

    Hofman-Schmidth never was able to realize his desire to have his wife and three children join him here. The club Dania, of which he was a member, will take care of his funeral. He was an epicurean--this was his only defect.

    The funeral will take place today. May he rest in peace.

    Hofman-Schmidth, who became well known to the Germans during the last election campaign, died in Chicago yesterday morning from a kidney ailment. Niels Axel de Hofman-Schmidth belonged to an old ...

    Danish
    IV, II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 09, 1874
    [The Directors of the German Society Meet]

    The directors of the German Society held a meeting yesterday. After the financial conditions had been discussed, Mr. A. C. Hesing made an address. He said he was sorry to have to mention some unpleasant matters. He did not wish to appear as if he had stabbed some directors in the back. Each of the gentlemen knows, that if he is the owner of the controlling part of the stocks of the Illinois Staats Zeitung, he is nevertheless not the sole owner of it, and that he very seldom and only in exceptional cases exercises any control over what is printed in the paper. He further read an article from the Freie Presse wherein was insinuated that he had forced himself upon Teutonia as president and that he had been elected under the proviso that he would hand his salary over to the German Society. But this promise he has kept only apparently for he has not handed this money over to the German Society, but has given it only a note payable in September, which at that time may have become valueless. Further that through attacks on the president of the German Society he is aiming to have him removed so as to be able to take his place.

    This article has hurt him deeply, that its purpose was to ruin his credit and credit is, what he now needs. Each of the gentlemen knows that he lost 100,000.00 during the great fire and that in a recent financial transaction he lost another $100,000.00.

    2

    He would pay his debts up to the last penny but for that he needs time and credit.

    Mr. Knobelsdorff knows", he continued, "that it was by chance that I went to the Teutonia meeting when they could not agree on a president, I was asked if I would accept the nomination. I replied that I would provide that I had the right to give away my salary and that my successors would not be bound by my action." Mr. Knobelsdorff confirmed these facts.

    The directors of the German Society held a meeting yesterday. After the financial conditions had been discussed, Mr. A. C. Hesing made an address. He said he was sorry to ...

    German
    II D 10, II B 2 d 1, II A 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 10, 1874
    Yearly Report of the German Society.

    The constitution of the German Society of Chicago for the protection of immigrants, obliges its president to make a yearly report of the activities of the German Society. Mr. George Schneider, the preident, submitted his report which was accepted.

    The German Society was founded about twenty years ago, at the time of the reaction in Germany, when a great stream of immigration flowed toward the West. The German Society was founded to help the immigrants.

    After the great fire the German Society was combined for a short time with the Aid and Relief Society. When the latter society was dissolved, the German Society broadened its activity, by also taking care of the needy ones. For this reason it opened last winter a lodging house for the homeless.

    Worth to be mentioned also is the founding of the German American Dispensary.

    The Irish, spurred on by the example of the German Society of Chicago have founded an Irish immigration association.

    2

    Worth to be mentioned also is the founding of the German American Dispensary.

    The Irish, spurred on by the example of the German Society of Chicago have founded an Irish immigration association.

    The constitution of the German Society of Chicago for the protection of immigrants, obliges its president to make a yearly report of the activities of the German Society. Mr. George ...

    German
    II D 10, II D 3, III G, I C, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 23, 1874
    A Declaration from A. C. Hesing

    "Since much has been said and written in the last few days concerning my private affairs, and especially in regard to my connection with the Germania fire insurance, I wish to explain my financial situation to the public and let it be the judge.

    Refore the fire I was connected with three other business enterprises besides the Staats Zeitung, three of them and four beautiful homes became a prey of the flames. Only the lumber business and the plane mill connected with it, were spared. On that day I lost about $125,000.00. The news of the disaster brought me quickly back to Chicago. After an absence of eighteen months, I arrived in Chicago early in November, 1871, three weeks after the fire. A brief survey revealed that my credit was unimpaired. So I went to work and helped not only to erect the Staats Zeitung building, valued with the machinery at $265,000.00 but I also did my part for the reconstruction of the North Side by having several homes built. In March, last year when the Staats Zeitung's building was hardly finished, Mr. Gustorf, manager of the Garden City Manufacturing Company, paid me a visit in my quality of main share owner and told me that he could not pursue his work without an extension of his liabilities. The business owed at that time $100,000.00 to 2the banks, which I had indorsed; it owed further $125,000.00 to lumbermen and building debts, mortgages and business debts of $150,000.00. All together $375,000.00. It was considered best to call a meeting of the creditors and submit to them a statement of the assets and the liabilities. The report of Mr. Gustorf revealed that the Garden City Manufacturing Company had a surplus fortune of $175,000.00 beyond its debts, that the arrears could be easily collected and that it was only a matter of gaining time to be able to care for all the liabilities. At the meeting a committee of five was selected to examine the books. It was reported that they were in order, and the creditors were asked to grant time extension provided I was willing to furnish a guaranty. I asked for time to think it over. But as Mr. Gustorf assured me that the assets were on hand and that I did not risk anything I decided to indorse notes to the amount of $225,000.00.

    A fifth of this amount, $45,000.00 became due in September, 1873, and was paid promptly. Then came the financial crash. I wanted to wind up the business but Mr. Gustorf assured me, again, that he would be able to pull through with only a little more help, and in order to save my shares, which amounted to $100,000.00 as well as my indorsements, I gave again security for $30,000.00. But all was in 3vain. Credit and confidence disappeared everywhere and the Garden City Manufacturing Company was forced to liquidate. My responsibility towards the company amounted to $210,000.00. My security for it was a second mortgage on the will property. The first one amounted to $50,00.00.

    Few would have had the courage to keep on but I decided to call my friends and creditors together and see if I could not gain a time extension.

    All five banks were most friendly and gave me the desired time extension. I pawned all my personal belongings in order to pay all by debts up to the last penny. The creditors at a later meeting made the proposition that I should take over the mill property for $125,000.00 and pay the first mortgage. I accepted the proposition and the mill became my property.

    But I soon learned that I had been deceived, that the factory was in a bad shape. According to the report of October, 1873, $169,000.00 was supposed to be there and now it was discovered that nothing was, and that even the lumber provisions were quoted beyond their value. My loss was over $200,000.00.

    4

    Then came the court decision enjoining the stockholders of the Germania Fire Insurance to pay their notes in full. I was unable to pay the $19,500.00. Mr. Vocke received, then, the order to sell my notes, insured through the shares of the Illinois Streets Zeitung.

    Every one knows that money has no attraction for me. I have helped many of my fellow citizens.

    If some gentlemen asked why no judgment was pronounced against me, I retort, what good would it have done? Had I been thrown into bankruptcy, what would my creditors and the Germania have received? Some envious people resent my coach and horses but I am not going to sell a present received from my friends. I wish to insist that all my creditors will be paid and should I die, unexpectedly, my son and heir will assume all my responsibilities.

    "Since much has been said and written in the last few days concerning my private affairs, and especially in regard to my connection with the Germania fire insurance, I wish ...

    German
    IV, II A 2, II B 2 d 1, II D 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 05, 1874
    Let Us Have No Misunderstanding (Editorial)

    The following is an excerpt from a recent issue of the Chicago Evening Journal:

    "Recently Mr. [A. C.] Hesing, the leader of the Germans in the West, made a speech in which he stated that the Republicans would lose the Illinois election next fall as a result of having watered paper money. Since the time of this statement, President Grant's veto has taken all the wind out of Mr. Hesing's sails. And in order to be consistent, Mr. Hesing would have to predict a great victory for the Republicans in Illinois."

    The Albany Evening Journal, The Nation, and the New York World are rejoicing because of the address which Mr. Hesing made before the Illinois State Republican Committee. These papers assume that he was the leader of an anti-Republican movement last fall. This assumption is based either on ignorance or upon a 2willful disregard of the truth. The election held last fall was not a party battle. Republicans and Democrats alike cast aside all party considerations. Colvin's election to the mayoralty was no more a defeat of the Republican party than it was a defeat of the clergymen of Chicago; indeed, not even as much, for the churches took sides in the matter, while the political parties as such were strictly neutral."

    An Englishman once said that one has to drill a hole in the head of either a German or a Scot before the point of a joke can enter. We wish to point out that it is likewise necessary to drill a hole into the skull of an American political partisan to make him understand that a person who has been a leader in a political party can sever all relations with that party for all times.

    The Illinois State Republican Committee would not believe that Mr. Hesing wished to have nothing further to do with their party, and they virtually pulled him into their meeting by the collar. And there he explained as well as could have been done in any tongue, that he wanted to have no future 3dealings with the party that had so ruthlessly trampled upon its solemn vows. One would think that would have been sufficiently explicit. If one gives another a slap in the face, or a kick in the pants, such treatment should be sufficient to convince him that "friendly days" are past. However, it seems that this method does not convince an American politician. He merely laughs it off and says: "He doesn't mean that. He will come around again."

    However, Germans are of a different pattern. They make resolutions only after careful deliberation, and consequently are much slower in acting than Americans; for the latter are wholly governed by mood or fashion, whereas once a Teuton makes a decision he abides by it. That is true with reference to the case in question. What Mr. Hesing told the Illinois State Republican Committee is nothing but the honest opinion of those Germans, without whose votes the Republican party was and will be only a minority party in Cook County and Chicago. Chicago was the stronghold of the Republican party in the Northwest, not because the English-speaking members of the party constitute a majority of voters, but because Chicago's Germans faithfully supported the Republican ticket. This 4support was highly pleasing to the English-speaking Republicans; but at the first opportunity which the latter had to comply with the just demands of the Germans, they retreated--retreated cowardly.

    "They were neutral," says the Evening Journal. That is a very mild expression. It would have been more correct to have said that they slunk back into their hiding place. They kept to their hideouts and were just as willing to acclaim the Puritan preachers who called the Germans "damned German infidels"--in case the "law-and-order" party had won--as they were to kowtow to the Germans--in case the "Dutch" were victorious. They came crawling at dusk to assure us privately that they shared the opinions of "their German friends," but that they could not declare their friendship publicly because of "due consideration" for preachers, for women, or for neighbors; and then they crept back into their holes as furtively as they had left them, and laughed to themselves about the way they had humbugged the "dumb Dutchmen".

    However, those "Dutchmen" were not as "dumb" as the gentlemen thought. After 5listening to all the insincere protestations of friendship they learned to despise the cowards who thought they could deceive the "dumb Dutchmen" so easily.

    Thus, the election last fall was a settlement of affairs between the English-speaking and the German-speaking Republicans. The latter were aware that the former were deserting them, although the English would have been only too willing to share in the victory, had the "dumb Dutchmen" achieved one. Since that time the English-speaking Republicans have learned that they did not constitute a majority without the Germans, but that the Germans and the Irishmen could win any election. The primary objective of the English-speaking Republicans has been the separation of the Germans from the Irish, and the Germans' reunion with the Republican party. That is why they invited Mr. Hesing to the meeting of the State Republican Committee, and that is why the Committee submitted to the tongue-lashing which it received from Mr. Hesing; but their endeavors were in vain. Both Mr. Hesing and the Illinois Staats-Zeitung are through with the Republican party.

    6

    And the veto of President Grant does not alter matters. The President's act evoked cheers from those German Republicans who were serious about the national platform of the Republican party. They are happy because in 1872 their votes helped to put a man in the White House who refused to become an infamous traitor to the sacred pledges of the Republican party; but they are not likely to forget that an overwhelming majority of English-speaking Republicans were guilty of cowardly disloyalty to the principles of the Republican party; but they are not likely to forget that an overwhelming majority of English-speaking Republican were guilty of cowardly disloyalty to the principles of the Republican party and had expressed great joy over the performance of an act which the Republican platforms of 1868 and 1872 termed "a crime against the nation". The German-speaking Republicans will be less likely to forget that the Republican party in the state of Illinois was closely allied to those members of our National Assembly who were leaders in the paper-money swindle. The German-speaking Republicans of Chicago and Cook County will always advocate and defend those principles for which they joined the Republican party; but since the majority of the English-speaking members of the Republican party have abandoned, yea, even repudiated, those principles, we "dumb Dutchmen" absolutely refuse to have anything to do with the Republican party. 7We hope that the gentlemen understand us "dumb Dutchmen". If they do not, we shall be glad to be more explicit.

    The following is an excerpt from a recent issue of the Chicago Evening Journal: "Recently Mr. [A. C.] Hesing, the leader of the Germans in the West, made a speech ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 6, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 08, 1874
    [Political Matters]

    The Evening Journal in almost polite article, tries to prove that the Illinois Staats-Zeitung is making a mistake by leaving the Republican party. The Journal thinks that, essentially, the party is still the same as the one for the principles of which the Staats-Zeitung formerly fought. The disputes concerning the temperance question and the inflation should have no influence. These are no party questions and the Republican party has never incorporated them in its program. It is true many Republicans favor temperance and inflation but not the Republican party as such. If that were the case the Journal itself, would leave the party and join hands with the Staats-Zeitung.

    We answer that the essence of a party are not the principles put down on paper, but the opinions and actions of the majority of its members. If the majority of the members completely ignores the principles of its party, nothing remains of the essence of this party.

    This is the case here. Of the English speaking Republicans, at least two thirds are champions of temperance and of inflation.

    The German Republicans belonged to the Republican party as long as the primitive 2purpose for which it was formed had not been attained. Not only has slavery been abolished, but its abolition has been permanently confirmed by the re-election of President Grant. The only remaining lofty national purpose to be fulfilled by the Republican party was the security of the credit and of the honor of this country, but this purpose, also, has been forgotten by the majority of the English speaking Republicans.

    The Journal warns us that the Democratic party is still worse. But we have no intention whatsoever of joining the Democratic party. We wish to form a new and healthy party. When, and in what shape, this will be accomplished, we cannot tell as yet. Once this has been done we hope to be able to receive the Journal into the new party.

    The Evening Journal in almost polite article, tries to prove that the Illinois Staats-Zeitung is making a mistake by leaving the Republican party. The Journal thinks that, essentially, the party ...

    German
    I F 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 18, 1874
    Young American.

    The concept connected with the name young American is not a very pleasant one. The term young America connotes youth which has outgrown its parents and which resents parental authority as an infringement upon its independence. Young America begins to blossom at the age of ten, to loaf at the age of thirteen and to become obnoxious at the age of fifteen. That is in regard to the boys. Young America among the girls is not any better. At the age of twelve she has a "beau" and at fifteen the miss starts her moonlight walks and her love affairs. Young America is bad, but not half as bad as "young German America".

    It cannot be denied that in many German homes the children grow up without any supervision and that boys and girls become loafers of the worst type. What a correspondent recently said, that here boys loaf in the saloons till past midnight is only half of the truth. He, who wishes to go on North Avenue on a Sunday afternoon, can see there clusters of boys at the street corners, who make the most indecent remarks concerning the passers by, who on evenings run around with girls just as young as they and who being work shy would not recoil from crimes. For this we have the word of the oldest and most experience policemen, who assert that no Irish street boy is as bad as a German boy.

    The concept connected with the name young American is not a very pleasant one. The term young America connotes youth which has outgrown its parents and which resents parental authority ...

    German
    I B 3 b, I B 3 c, II E 3, III A, III G
  • Chicago Times -- May 19, 1874
    Can There Be Too Much Wealth? (Editorial)

    The German communists of Chicago assembled together and solemnly declared that "the present crisis is the result of reckless production"; that unless something is done about it, these things must be and overcome us like a summer's cloud every few years "to the entire ruin of the working classes"; and the said classes, "by studying national economy, have concluded that similar emergencies can only be prevented by reducing the hours of labor." And whereas the German communists of Chicago, by studying national economy, and listening attentively to harangues by such profound economists as Karl Klings, have reached the conclusion that these propositions are undeniably true, therefore they resolve that they will go in with might and main for the eight-hour system "in all branches of business, public and private."

    We have smashed the machine with statutory sledge-hammers, and now our German workingmen propose to mend it by laying on the sledge-hammer still more violently. If they have their way it will not need a prophet nor the son of a prophet to predict the consequences.

    The German communists of Chicago assembled together and solemnly declared that "the present crisis is the result of reckless production"; that unless something is done about it, these things must ...

    German
    I E, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 05, 1874
    Concerts in Lincoln Park (Editorial)

    The first concert of the season will be given tomorrow at Lincoln Park. It will be an important event in the history of music in the United States, for it will be the first free concert to be held in a public park. All attempts to arrange similar concerts in New York have failed.

    Chicago may congratulate itself upon having introduced a custom which neigh-boring communities will soon follow, and which will later be general through-out the country. It is certain to have very beneficial results. However, tomorrow's concert, and the ones to follow could not be presented if it were not for the Germans of Chicago who on November 4 defended their right to arrange such entertainments on Sunday, successfully opposing the advocates of temperance who sought to have legislation enacted that would make it an offense to provide or listen to any but sacred music on Sunday.

    2

    Our working men, especially those who are not financially able to attend concerts during the week, have looked forward to these Sunday concerts with great pleasure, and perhaps with much patience also. This form of recreation is of much greater importance to a diligent laborer forced to work six days a week to shelter, clothe, and feed himself and his family, than an Italian opera to a wealthy person. And the rich are duty-bound to do what they can to maintain this source of pleasure and education for the benefit of the working class. It is their duty to contribute the money necessary to make these concerts a success. Sufficient funds are on hand to pay the expenses connected with a number of concerts, but more money is needed; and it must be contributed by our Germans. This is an enterprise of the Germans of this city, and the cost must be met by them. Americans as a group are opposed to Sunday concerts and will not contribute for them. They collect funds for their Saturday concerts and give more than is needed for that purpose. Now it is up to the Germans to do their share. The Illinois Staats-Zeitung will gladly accept contributions and acknowledge their receipt in the newspaper columns at regular intervals.

    The first concert of the season will be given tomorrow at Lincoln Park. It will be an important event in the history of music in the United States, for it ...

    German
    II A 3 b, I B 2