The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 03, 1874
    Report of Manager of German Home for Needy, 140 South Union Street (December, 1873)

    Today, December 31, 1873 there are 63 persons in the German Home for Needy. During the entire month only 310 persons were admitted to the institution. They received board and lodging. The aggregate time that they spent at the institution was 980 days. Accordingly, the average number of persons who received aid daily was 35.

    Following is a list of inmates classified according to their occupation or profession: 14 cabinetmakers, 104 laborers, 10 bookbinders, 3 printers, 1 cork cutter, 2 blacksmiths, 1 typesetter, 2 tinners, 9 cooks, 5 coopers, 3 locksmiths, 6 farmers, 3 weavers, 3 moulders, 3 upholsterers, 1 metal winder, 4 tailors, 8 bakers, 2 mechanical draftsmen, 4 stewards, 2 coppersmiths, 3 butchers, 7 engineers, 8 artists, 18 bartenders, 1 stoneworker, 4 sailors, 2 cab drivers, 2 cigarmakers, 3 journalists, 5 tanners, 1 Doctor of Philosophy, 3 masons, 3 millers, 2 pharmacists, 1 music teacher, 37 salesmen, 1 clerk, 21 milliner, 1 barber, 1 cobbler, 1 gardener.

    During the past month only one woman was an inmate of the Home, and she remained only three days.

    We received gratis the following furniture, furnishings, and utensils: 32 bedsteads, 23 mattresses, 16 pillows, 28 woolen blankets, 15 quilts, 18 towels, 5 heaters, 2 stoves, 8 tables, 72 chairs, many dishes, and all the kitchen utensils needed at present.

    The institution can give shelter to 300 persons, but until recently we had sleeping quarters for only 75 persons.

    By order of the German Society of Chicago we purchased a closed grocery wagon and a harness for $70, and Dr. Stromberg presented the Home with a horse.

    The outfit will be used to haul meat, bread, and other donated articles.

    3

    Since the value of the provisions on hand in the institution at present is only about $300, an employee will call at the various places of business to solicit meat, groceries, bread, vegetables, clothing, shoes, coal, etc.

    The donors will record their gifts in a subscription book which the driver of the wagon must present.

    The drug department of the institution is under the supervision of Mr. Emil Dietzsch and his assistant, Mr. M. Muffat, and is well supplied. One hundred and sixty-three prescriptions were compounded for indigent sick people during the month of December. The institution fills only those prescriptions which are written by licensed and competent physicians.

    Cleanliness is evident in all departments, and all work is done by inmates. The latter receive a meal of bread and coffee in the morning, and in the evening soup and meat is served, and vegetables, when they are available.

    4

    Strict rules of hygiene are observed at the Home. Every person is bathed and otherwise thoroughly cleansed upon admission, and if the Home was supplied with clothing to replace dirty garments we could prevent infestation by vermin.

    By order of the German Society of Chicago homeless people will be admitted for only three days, and after that time they must file application for readmission.

    The manager has been authorized to act as special policeman for the institution, and with the assistance of a city policeman who is stationed at the institution from 4 to 10 p. m., he is able to enforce all rules.

    Respectfully,

    A. L. Forker, Manager,

    C. Knobelsdorff, Chairman of the Executive Board,

    George Schneider, President,

    The German Society of Chicago.

    Today, December 31, 1873 there are 63 persons in the German Home for Needy. During the entire month only 310 persons were admitted to the institution. They received board and ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 2
  • Chicago Times -- January 07, 1874
    German Emigration.

    It might be an inquiry of some value to learn why our main sources of population, are in two peoples so thoroughly opposed to each other in every particular. There is scarcely a thing in common between the Irishman and the German, except that they are impelled to seek the same destination. The Irishman comes hither cursing the government which he has left behind him; the German comes impressed with the idea that the government he leaves is the best and grandest in the world. The one never hears of a British success without a malediction; the other is tremulously alive to the honor and operations of the German government, so that the victories of William and the triumphs of Bismark are as heartily cheered and rejoiced over by the Germans of Chicago and New York as by thoseof Berlin. The Irishman is a devoted religionist and Catholic the German is just as much a free-thinker and anultra hater of pope, priest and sanctuary. Nor is the difference of temperament less marked in the two races. The one is quick, impetuous, impulsive; the other slow, calculating, and phlegmatic. The one enlists for the fun of a fight, from a desire for change and adventure; the German puts his name on the troop-roll as a matter of calculation, because there is loot, promotion, compensation in the prospect.

    2

    Some Irishmen become wealthy; far more Germans attain the same end, for the reason that the former is generous, improvident, open-handed, while the latter is close, penurious, saving. Why, then, should two peoples, thus exactly unlike in every essential as well as non-essential particular, seek the same country to an extent far greater than all other races combined?

    It may be that this is one of nature's tricks or designs in the direction of compensations. The two act as counterpoises of each other. Flood the country with either, to the exclusion of the other; give either unlimited control of affairs, and the result would be most disastrous. That these opposites come in quantities that so balance each other, enables the native population-- and by native we mean all those born in, and identified with, the country whether of foreign or native parentage--to hold the balance of power and to prevent affairs from gravitating either in the direction of the one or the other. This of course applies only to the first or second generations of the emigrants for the reason that the grandchildren, and often the children of both, are anxious for nothing so as to drop their ancestral line, and to regard themselves wholly as Americans.

    It might be an inquiry of some value to learn why our main sources of population, are in two peoples so thoroughly opposed to each other in every particular. There ...

    German
    I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 10, 1874
    Meeting of Directors of German Society of Chicago

    The board of directors of the German Society of Chicago met at 5 P. M. yesterday at the office of the Society, 51-53 South LaSalle Street. Mr. George Schneider, chairman of the Board, presided.

    The minutes of the last meeting were adopted as read.

    Colonel Knobelsdorff reported that excellent order prevails at the Home for Needy, and that business matters are well regulated. However, he thinks that the value of all goods donated heretofore is not more than one thousand dollars, the published reports estimate the value at two thousand dollars. A special collection book was used to keep account of donations made to the institution. It was always used by the solicitor of the Home.

    Maintenance cost to date was two hundred dollars.

    2

    The report was adopted after the records of the secretary and treasurer had been examined and approved.

    It was voted to authorize the board of directors of the Home to assume complete charge of the institution, to transact all business connected with the management, to accept or reject applications for admission, etc. The secretary of the German Society of Chicago was instructed to approve payment of all bills presented by the chairman of the board of directors of the institution.

    Mr. H. Enders then reported on the financial status of the Home:

    Receipts, (November 26, 1873 to January 9, 1874)

    Cash................................$7,451.62

    Goods.............................. 2,056.85

    Total...............................$9,508.47

    3

    Subscribed but not paid................................................... 720.00

    Total.................................................................... $10,228.47

    Eighty collectors have reported so far.

    Mr. Enders was instructed to write receipts for the donations yet to be received and to give these receipts to the collectors.

    Report of Treasurer

    Balance on November 26, 1873...........................................$1,862.66

    Disbursements, November 26, 1873 to December 31, 1873...........$2,189.63

    Receipts, November 26, 1873 to January 9, 1874......................$7,451.62

    Disbursements, January 1, 1874 to January 9, 1874....................$1,000.00

    Balance, January 9, 1874..................................................$5,001.62

    4

    [Translator's note: The final paragraph of this article is irrelevant.]

    The board of directors of the German Society of Chicago met at 5 P. M. yesterday at the office of the Society, 51-53 South LaSalle Street. Mr. George Schneider, chairman ...

    German
    III B 2, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 19, 1874
    Meeting of Stonecutters

    In answer to a request signed by Fred Schweitzer, John Hecker, John Perz, Fritz Olendorf, Albert Rapp, Gottfried Sendlinger, Martin Frankenberg, Georg Stenge, and Charles Arnold, approximately forty-two German stonecutters met at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon at 487 South Canal Street to discuss the attitude which they will assume toward their employees during the coming building season. The meeting was very well conducted.

    Mr. Isermann called the meeting to order. Mr. H. F. Riepel was elected chairman, and Mr. Olendorf, secretary.

    The chairman opened the meeting with a few introductory remarks. The reporter of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung (the only newspaper that published a notice of the meeting) was granted permission to be present.

    Mr. Isermann: "Present conditions demand that we stand together. In a few 2months the coming building season will open, and we must now determine what our relations to our employers shall be. Apparently they intend to continue in their old ways, and, unfortunately, there are some workers who do not act in the interest of all workers. The German employees should at least unite more closely to effect an agreement with their employers, and then they should abide by the agreement, no matter what course the English unions may take."

    Mr. Paetz: "The proposed union should take as its object the increase of our sick-benefit fund. It should also protect itself against attacks and schemes of other nationalities. We Germans have only suffered when we have fought to keep the promises which we made to others. We must organize to protect ourselves against other workers."

    Mr. Williams: "I have followed the trade of stonecutting for many years in Chicago, and I have had contact with two German associations. I am opposed to exclusion of other nationalities. All stonecutters, without respect to 3nationality, must organize. Then, and then only, can we 'dictate' to bosses." Mr. Isermann: "I do not agree with Mr. Williams. All nationalities may join our present association and how has it used our money? The high wages which we received last year were a result of economic conditions and were not brought about by the activity of our association. Up to the present time our union has raised six thousand dollars and has squandered the money. We Germans contributed two thousand dollars of that amount, and had we administered the fund, we would still have the money and could purchase a building where we could have our meetings and our social activities. I do not object to working handin-hand with our English co-workers; but I do demand that the money which is paid by Germans be administered by Germans."

    Johann Meyer: "I know that during the past eighteen or twenty years the German members of our association have been slighted by the English members. However, the fault lies with the Germans who did not attend the meetings although their membership is numerically stronger than the English membership. Had they done their duty, the former Treasurer would not have been able to 4abscond or squander the money of the Union."

    Chairman: "I know from observation that the Germans could completely control the affairs of our organization if they would act as a unit. The principal offices were entrusted to the Germans for five years. It was not until 1869 that participation in the business matters of the union by the Germans began to decline. It is true, they alone are to blame, because they failed to assert their influence. However, if we Germans again organize an independent association, we will have to take active interest in its success, if it is to be of any benefit to us. I am opposed to any rash procedure and advise that we give this matter very careful thought before we take action, for there are unreliable men among the Germans also."

    Mr. Stephan: "I protest against the statement recently made by German stone-cutters who are working on the new post-office--that they are the only respectable representatives of the craft. I think that much dishonesty is being practiced in connection with the erection of this Government building, 5and that we ought to demand a rigid investigation."

    Mr. Isermann: "I would like to call your attention to the way the cabinetmakers and masons administer the affairs of their associations. They have special sections for Germans, and we ought to make a similar arrangement. The dishonesty prevailing among employers who are building the new post-office is one of the reasons why this meeting was called. They must cease discriminating against the German element. We are full-pledged citizens of this country and pay taxes, and therefore we have just as much, if not more right to work than the Canadians who were enemies of the Union during the Civil War and who sheltered Rebels."

    Mr. Loss: "I have worked at the Federal Building for twenty-two days, and I know that the stonecutters have elected a committee to investigate the alleged dishonesty."

    Mr. Schweitzer: "I believe that if those stonecutters employed at the Federal Building who are not citizens of the United States would be dismissed, the 6number of employes would be decreased by eighty-five per cent."

    During the course of the debate many very uncomplimentary things were said about Mr. Selius, a stonecutter employed at the Federal Building, who stated that Germans would rather sit at the bar and drink beer than work.

    Mr. Isermann recommended that a committee be appointed to draft a program for a future meeting. This recommendation was accepted. The following men were chosen to serve as members of this committee: Hanno Isermann, Friedrich Schweitzer, Johann Meyer, John Williams, Adam Stephan, H. F. Riepel.

    Adjournment followed.

    In answer to a request signed by Fred Schweitzer, John Hecker, John Perz, Fritz Olendorf, Albert Rapp, Gottfried Sendlinger, Martin Frankenberg, Georg Stenge, and Charles Arnold, approximately forty-two German stonecutters ...

    German
    I D 2 a 3, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 25, 1874
    Health Department Negligent (Editorial)

    During the past few days the Illinois Staats-Zeitung has received numerous complaints that the Health Department of our city is very negligent about posting notices on homes where there are cases of smallpox. For instance, the house (in North Larrabee Street) occupied by the rich American Weed family that has been visited by the terrible disease, bears no yellow sign to warn that it is dangerous to enter. Several members of the Weed family have suffered from the disease for more than six weeks. Still the house has not yet been quarantined; even the postman who is duty-bound to visit the house nearly every day, knew nothing about the illness of these people until yesterday when he learned by accident (and then convinced himself) that a yellow sign is nailed to the rear door. The same condition is prevalent at 41 Goethe Street and at other places. In recent times several foreigners have been severely dealt with by the city authorities for not placing yellow signs at the place prescribed by law.

    2

    They deserved to be punished. But the wealthy should be no exception to the rule. The Health Department will do well to look into this matter. It will do no good whatever to force people to submit to vaccination, if thoughtless spreading of the plague is encouraged. A postman could easily transmit the germs of the disease from home to home. We advise Mr. Weed to immediately attach the yellow sign to the front door of his palatial residence.

    And the Reverend Robert Laird Collier who is well informed on the matter, as we positively know from a very reliable source, and who even voted twice on November 4, (no doubt for the purpose of giving special expression to his pious convictions) would do something really humane and Christian, if he raised his holy voice against such flagrant transgressions of the law.

    During the past few days the Illinois Staats-Zeitung has received numerous complaints that the Health Department of our city is very negligent about posting notices on homes where there are ...

    German
    I M, I F 6
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 29, 1874
    Evanston's War against the Germans.

    There is hardly to be found in Illinois a city as saintly, as much addicted to the Bible, as pious as Evanston, If in a city wish as many churches and prayer houses, halos of saints do not as yet grow on the skulls of its inhabitants, for that, wicked Chicago is probably responsible. Sham, sanctity, and hypocrisy, secret vices, and immorality flourish in this little clean nest and the Chicago Times published last Sunday an article, telling how a Reverend was turning several virgins of his parish into young women and is now awaiting the decision of the court; but the Staats Zeitung would not pay any attention to that, for such stories and such pious dirt can be found any day in the American bible camp; but it may not be known to all the readers that many good Germans are living in Evanston and especially in the surrounding neighborhood as Rosehill and Gross Point. It is probably even less known that in Evanston a mob of fanatics is persecuting the Germans and Irish in every manner.

    Of course there are no saloons in Evanston, although every one there drinks his own whiskey; in the the three drug stores, brandy and whiskey can be had at exorbitant prices upon presentation of medical prescription; later the patient with 2his biblepale face receives his drink also without a prescription.

    Recently, two Germans there, one of whom has a cigar store, the other a bakery and both of whom have permission to serve cider, were placed on trial on account of the paid for testimony of an American scamp who claimed that 2 glasses of this cider had made him drunk; also two saloon keepers from Gross Point are on trial under the same circumstances.

    As the so called university in Evanston, independently passed a law that no saloons were allowed within a circuit of 4 miles, the saloon keepers are persecuted in every manner. This stupid law or charter is of course void. Then the saloon keepers who have their taverns in Rose Hill and Gross Point had them before the university of the fanatics was ever built.

    Let him who wants to know about the Evanston saints inquire at the Chicago Wholesale Liquor Stores. There he will find out what a tremendous business is done with Evanston. One can state that no where does the secret whiskey drinker flourish more than in Evanston. May parents consider seriously before sending their children to a school where nothing is done scientifically and where the 3dangers of secret vice are so close.

    One of the heroes of the Evanston saints, is a little paper, the Evanston Index which is nothing but a spitoon of the Reverends.

    It is to be hoped that the Germans there will get together, start a club and fight their enemies.

    There is hardly to be found in Illinois a city as saintly, as much addicted to the Bible, as pious as Evanston, If in a city wish as many churches ...

    German
    I C, I F 4, I F 3, I A 1 a, I F 6, III C, I B 1
  • Chicago Times -- February 09, 1874
    More Blatherskite

    The German workingmen's club of southwest Chicago held a meeting at their hall, 139 West Polk Street, on yesterday afternoon.

    During a portion of the time there were at least one hundred attendants. while fully half that number remained until the adjournment. About twenty five new members were admitted to fellowship of the club.

    The call and prospectus of the new German workingmen's weekly paper was read. A liberal translation of its German title would read "Forerunner for City and Country." It says in substance that the daily English and German papers, failing to see the true state of the people's affairs, constantly slander, lie about, and insult the working and middle classes. All office-seekers, ward bummers, tax-eaters, contract swindlers, and press parasites sneer at the new ideas of this party. The meetings of the workingmen's club have either been entirely ignored by the German press, or have been grossly misrepresented, and the workingmen's party has been already declared dead, and the above named parties have prematurely danced on the corpse. The Forerunner is published to show that the wake was held too soon.

    2

    It is owned by the workingmen's party, and will be published by them for the benefit of the workingmen's and farmers' movements, and proposes to expose the wrongs perpetrated on them.

    Messrs. Klings, Winne, Greenhut, Krause, and others addressed the meeting in German. No English speeches were made, all in the room being of thoroughly Teutonic proclivities, drinking the national beverage whilst listening attentively to the harangues of the communistic brawlers. The main argument of all the speakers was that the working masses having votes, and having votes, and having the power of creating public opinion, it was vital to their interests that the power of the ballet-box should be intelligently used to better their condition. They should no longer be the more voting cattle of Hesing or any other demagogue or political back, and should no longer listen to their pernicious counsels.

    The movement has already created ten German Clubs, one Bohemian, one Polish, one Scandinavian and one Irish club.

    The German workingmen's club of southwest Chicago held a meeting at their hall, 139 West Polk Street, on yesterday afternoon. During a portion of the time there were at least ...

    German
    I F 3
  • Chicago Times -- February 19, 1874
    [A Split Among Workers]

    The split among the workingmen, which has separated the English-speaking from the German-speaking elements, has been brought about by the intense communism of the latter. The communism of the latter has been brought about by the toleration of the American people in so freely opening our country to the land-pirates of Europe. The way to prevent the spread of communism here, is to close our seaports against the further ingress of European vagabondage. Just how this should be done is not a problem easy to solve. Perhaps we might enact laws whereby no one should be permitted to emigrate here who could not show sufficient credentials as to his not having been either a thief, a pauper, or a vagabond in the country from which he comes. Had there been some such law in force, eleven-twelfths of these communistic gentlemen in our city would never have reached our shores. Instead of being in clover in Chicago they would now be in the Jails and pillories of their native lands.

    It is quite fortunate that this communistic element is not a large one. It will not increase in size from recruits gained in Chicago. A large percentage of its members will desert it just as soon as they find that no immediate division of property is likely to take place. What is wanted is plunder, and when it is found that plunder is not to be had by simply passing a resolution, they will desert the alliance for the sake of taking up some other department of thievery, in which the returns are more speedy and reliable.

    The split among the workingmen, which has separated the English-speaking from the German-speaking elements, has been brought about by the intense communism of the latter. The communism of the latter ...

    German
    I E, I C
  • Chicago Times -- February 20, 1874
    The "One-Man Power" in Legislation

    The people of Illinois elect one hundred and fifty representatives and fifty senators to do their legislative business..... The making of the laws, such a representative body reflecting the likeness of the people, is what has been called "government of the people by the people," in contradistinction to "personal government," of the "one man power."

    But a person of the name of Antony Caesar Hesing - a man born under the flag of foreign despot, inheriting from an indefinite ancestry a personal character fashioned, modified, and molded by the influences of despotic institutions; educated in a despotic school, and brought up, until past middle age, in the habits and modes of life and thought peculiar to a despotic state, which habits and modes, instead of endeavoring to outgrow them, he has persistently stuck to in a spirit of clannish fanaticism; this man enters the lobby of the House of Assembly, gives a signal to some servile place-hunters in the body, and, lo! an act of legislation which he commands, is done!

    ..... Suppose that the transplanted Austria, Hesing, or one of his servile parasites (say Mr. John Rountree) were mayor of Chicago, and the municipal 2legislature should decline any longer to commit an annual violation of the supreme law of the state by voting away the money to taxpayers to pay for publishing the public records of the city in a foreign language. Does any gentleman at Springfield doubt that the one man interested in the German printing steal would forbear to use the one-man power conferred on him by this most mischievous device of legislative folly, to bring the municipal legislature into obedience to his mercenary desire?

    If any man thinks so, charity compels the opinion that he must be very ignorant of the character of the transplanted Austrian, and of those characters most apt to profit by his favor.

    It is said that "the Cook County members will probably be a unit in favor of the measure." Do they then all confess themselves to be humble servants of the transplanted Austrian who boasts that he carries the "German vote" in his pocket? Do they seek for no higher or worthier guide of political action than the behest of a person trained in the habits and methods of old-world despotism, and who, as an American citizen, has shown a persistent unsympathy with and dislike of American institutions - nay, whose vehement boast of a desire to Austrianize this country is notorious?

    3

    Do they think that the true conception of a popular representative government is a law-making system allowing laws made by a representative body of the people to be amended by the decree of a single individual? Do they think that one manin a magic seat is more likely to be endowed with greater wisdom, honesty, and integrity than twenty-seven men in legislative chairs? Do they think it reconcilable with any principle of free government that the executive function should be made to include the major part of the legislative or sovereign function?

    If the "Cook County members" think these things, the best advice that can be given them is that they give a little time to the study of the rudiments, to the acquisition of some knowledge of the A. B. C.'s, of the institutions of the country in which they live.

    The people of Illinois elect one hundred and fifty representatives and fifty senators to do their legislative business..... The making of the laws, such a representative body reflecting the likeness ...

    German
    IV, I F 4, I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 24, 1874
    Dania Masquerade

    The twelfth annual masquerade of the Dania Club, took place yesterday evening in the North Side Turner Hall. The attendance was large. Many Germans and Americans were present, besides the Danes and the Scandinavians.

    The masquerade opened with a Chinese parade. The appearance of Prince Carnival put an end to this foreign foolishness by bringing everyone back to reality.

    The main presentation was the farce, "Puritanical Moral Philosophy," or a "Chapter from the Prayer Epidemic". On the stage a Chicago street is represented, with a saloon. The saloonkeeper (portrayed by J. Josephson) is conversing with his guests. McCarthy (A. Volguarz) approaches and asks the people to stop drinking while he begs the saloonkeeper to give up his barbarian trade. But as all his eloquence is in vain; an entire army of praying ladies comes to the rescue of McCarthy. But the saloonkeeper seems to understand his business. Supported by his gallant guests he offers the ladies a sample drink. So great was his 2power of persuasion, so enticing were the filled glasses that none of the ladies could resist. Many other glasses followed the sample drink. McCarthy drinks to the health of the saloonkeeper and general gaiety reigns amongst the fanatics.

    The twelfth annual masquerade of the Dania Club, took place yesterday evening in the North Side Turner Hall. The attendance was large. Many Germans and Americans were present, besides the ...

    Danish
    III B 2, I C, I B 1