The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 24, 1873
    A German Simpleton Wants a German Temperance Paper.

    The following contribution for the next number of the Temperance-Monthly reached Manager Kelly yesterday and appears, today, written in English translation in the Times.

    One of the worst manifestations of German journalism, in our city, is the position the German press takes in regard to the new temperance law; its siding with the tavern keeper, as in the case of Mr. Heim on the North Side, who made him-self guilty of the most elementary transgressions and was sentenced accordingly is made a martyr of liberty. The accuser and his witnesses are attacked editorially on their private and their business character. Judge, jury and prosecuting attorney are attacked. Even a deadlock in the jury is considered a victory.

    The following contribution for the next number of the Temperance-Monthly reached Manager Kelly yesterday and appears, today, written in English translation in the Times. One of the worst manifestations of ...

    German
    I B 1, II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 03, 1873
    [Sunday Observance]

    The saloons were not more nor less closed yesterday than on past Sundays. As all the doors were closed on account of the cold, it seemed to be still quieter than otherwise. Indeed it was a quiet Sunday. Under the present conditions of disorder in the police department, this is a pleasant fact. There is no doubt that the least distrubance now, would be ascribed to Rebellion and revolt by the fanatic haters of foreigners.

    The saloons were not more nor less closed yesterday than on past Sundays. As all the doors were closed on account of the cold, it seemed to be still quieter ...

    German
    I B 2, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 04, 1873
    [Turnverein Riducules Police Tyrant]

    The masquerade at the Vorwarts Turnverein was a great success. The decorations represented the tragi-comic end of the police tyrant, Washburn, and of his protector, Medill. There was much dancing, refreshments and drinks were plentiful.

    The masquerade at the Vorwarts Turnverein was a great success. The decorations represented the tragi-comic end of the police tyrant, Washburn, and of his protector, Medill. There was much dancing, ...

    German
    I B 2, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 06, 1873
    [The Sunday Closing Law]

    The devil's tail appeared clearly at the meeting in the Board of Trade Hall last Tuesday evening. Almost every speaker revealed a little of it, but what indicated most clearly the motive of their coming together, was the following recommendations:

    Resolved: "The citizens of Chicago expect and ask that the major and all those intrusted with the executing of the law, take care that the Sunday laws are strictly observed, and that after convictions for respected violation of the law, the license shall be taken away from the convicted tavern keeper and that it should never be returned to him."

    As far as we know, the entire trouble started because Mr. Washburn refused, as he was in duty bound, to put his innovations first before his superiors. That the partisans of Washburn made the above mentioned resolution, shows their secret motive. This meeting was called by the president of the temperance committee. The main speakers were the patron of the Y. M. C. A., John V. Farwell; the most fanatical temperance pastor of the city, Rev. Kittridge, and a few other notables of the same type.

    It is said of the Germans that they attack Washburn and Medill, because they have aligned themselves with the fanatics in regard to the Sunday laws.

    2

    We grant that this did not make Washburn nor Medill popular with the Germans, but we consider it as an infamous calumny if it is said that we oppose Medill in this matter on the account of his former offenses. It is better to say, that the persons who support Washburn do so because he proceeded against the Germans. How could it be explained otherwise that every speaker will knock the Germans before attacking other nationalities?

    The devil's tail appeared clearly at the meeting in the Board of Trade Hall last Tuesday evening. Almost every speaker revealed a little of it, but what indicated most clearly ...

    German
    I B 2, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 07, 1873
    [German Women Teachers]

    At the examination for German women teachers for the public schools which took place yesterday, were only nine women. Three of them did not understand one word of English, and two others were deficient in other regards. Only two seemed to be qualified. This is a sad situation and the German committee of the School Board is facing once more a lack of women teachers of the German language.

    At the examination for German women teachers for the public schools which took place yesterday, were only nine women. Three of them did not understand one word of English, and ...

    German
    II A 1, I A 1 b, I C, I K
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 11, 1873
    A Letter. Treatment of the Germans in the Poor House. to the Illinois Staats-Zeitung

    I wish to inform the German people about conditions in the Cook County poorhouse, and how the Germans are treated in comparison with the Americans and Irish. Through misfortune I was forced to come here and was willing as much as my swollen feet permitted, to work. Still, I was obliged to shovel snow barefoot in the most bitter cold, because my shoes were too small. I begged the Superintendent for a pair of stockings but I could not get any. There are many old and young healthy people in the poorhouse, who have not been yet eight days in the county before being received here - American Irish and English - who are furnished pants, shoes and stockings, and yet are not allowed to work, while there are here also from sixty to seventy-year-old Germans, who, unable to speak English, receive nothing.

    The room and the work bosses are all Irish and the Germans have to work under their direction. Any sensible German here could give more information if he were asked. There are not only patient Swabians but also patient Germans, and 2they are oppressed not only by the temperance law but by the Americans.

    (An answer from the officials of the poorhouse will be published in our columns. Editor.)

    I wish to inform the German people about conditions in the Cook County poorhouse, and how the Germans are treated in comparison with the Americans and Irish. Through misfortune I ...

    German
    II D 5, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 12, 1873
    Washburn's Police

    Fred Degan has been established for several days a custodian in the house, 552 Canal street. On Saturday, policeman Barton, No. 408 came to the house and said, "You German dog! You have no business to be here," and in spite of Mr. Regan's protest that he was there in an official capacity, he took him to the police station. Mr. Degan was held there until Monday, having robbers and criminals as his companions. Only yesterday he was released. We advise Mr. Degan to introduce an indemnity lawsuit.

    Fred Degan has been established for several days a custodian in the house, 552 Canal street. On Saturday, policeman Barton, No. 408 came to the house and said, "You German ...

    German
    I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 14, 1873
    The City Dictatorship.

    The dictator tendencies of Mr. Medill and the hopes of his supporters in the English newspapers, must have been crushed by the decision of the House of Representatives in Springfield. This decision puts the matter of the suppression of all the city boards in the hands of the Delegates of Cook County.

    Now, at least, two-thirds of those delegates are opposed to the granting of dictatorial powers to Mr. Medill. Let us hope that the English newspapers will not take it too much to heart. What a hellish outcry was their's last year about the German "rascals, scamps," on account of the protest of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, against the prohibition of Medill to build any more frame houses within the city limits. No insult was too low to be used against the Germans. With what contempt they spoke of "in a foreign language newspaper," which was defying, "the wishes of all decent citizens and of most devout pastors."

    The dictator tendencies of Mr. Medill and the hopes of his supporters in the English newspapers, must have been crushed by the decision of the House of Representatives in Springfield. ...

    German
    I F 3, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 14, 1873
    The Sunday Question

    The German-American, who was recently criticized by us for having had his defense of the Sunday law published in the Times, now sends us the following communication:

    "My dear Editor: Allow me to answer yoour article in which you call me a coward and a hypocrite. You call me a coward because I did not sign my name after an article in the Times. I do not deny that Germany has had outstanding men, but where there is much light there are also many shadows. It must be said that the uneducated German surpasses any other nation in coarseness. I did not sign my name because I did not want to expose myself to the vengeance and brutality of that type of person who is strongly represented in the "Liberty League." I have never claimed to speak in the name of all the Germans, but only in the name of decent German-Americans.

    No one can deny that we have too many saloons in Chicago and that many people have given up an honorable trade to become saloon-keepers, so as to indulge in laziness and often in drunkenness. Generally those saloon-keepers are Germans. When that type of person is exhorted to violate the law and after conviction is represented as a class of martyr, then indeed it is to be hoped 2 that the Germanization of this country will still be postponed for thousands of years. I sign once more - A German-American."

    Our opposition against this German American was based solely on the fact that instead of working among and with the Germans, he had to publish his views in an English newspaper, which is known for its hypocrisy and hatred for the Germans. At some other time we may answer the other accusations made in this letter.

    The Editor.

    The German-American, who was recently criticized by us for having had his defense of the Sunday law published in the Times, now sends us the following communication: "My dear Editor: ...

    German
    I B 2, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 15, 1873
    [The Sunday Law]

    The agitation against Sunday law is continued quietly. Several Irish aldermen do not intend to vote any longer in favor of the intolerant Puritans. The main reason is because these Puritans have handed in a bill according to which, anyone organizing on Sundays, theater shows, concerts, circuses, or any other form of recreation, would be liable to a $200.00 fine and six months imprisonment. The six Irish aldermen, who have so far voted with the Americans, are not willing to sanction the passage of such a Puritanical law.

    The agitation against Sunday law is continued quietly. Several Irish aldermen do not intend to vote any longer in favor of the intolerant Puritans. The main reason is because these ...

    German
    I B 2, I C