The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 03, 1873
    The Mayor, the Law and the People.

    The commissioners had a perfectly legal right to suspend Washburn, and the Mayor has no right to consider him Police superintendent any longer.

    In regard to the sentiment of the people, the Tribune asserts that it is entirely in favor of the Mayor and denies that the hatred of foreigners has anything to do with it. The Tribune specially defends the Mayor against the accusation of being a hater of foreigners. Now, we have never made any such accusation, but what we have said was that he allowed himself to be made a tool of the haters of foreigners.

    The main reason for the entire conflict is the Tribune knows that as well as we do the violent attack of the temperance adherents last fall, against the customs of the "foreigners" especially of the Germans.

    The brutal hatred of foreigners by such idiotic zealots as Kittredge and the temperance unions are the real motive for the revolt against the Police 2Commissioners. Washburn is, for those zealots, the Samson, who must crush the Philistines, and on account of that he must be maintained in office even if illegally. For over ten years different nationalities have lived peacefully together in Chicago and the Tribune itself never objected to the manner in which the Germans celebrated their Sundays, and now it claims that it should suddenly be forbidden them. If the Tribune does not believe that nativist hatred of foreigners has anything to with the revolt against the Police Commissioners, let it send its reporters to the gambling hell called Board of Trade, and let them hear how the respectable citizens there use the words "d----d Dutch" or d----d Irish" when they speak of Police Commissioners.

    The commissioners had a perfectly legal right to suspend Washburn, and the Mayor has no right to consider him Police superintendent any longer. In regard to the sentiment of the ...

    German
    I B 2, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 04, 1873
    Unpleasant Outlook for Nativism.

    For the American nativists, who consider Americanism as an already accomplished nationality and wish, consequently, to impose their ideals upon others, the census made in 1870 contains a serious lesson. It appears from it that of the 38,500,000 inhabitants of the United States in 1870 - 5,500,000 were born in foreign countries, that almost ten million were children of foreign-born parents, that at least half a million had a foreign-born father, ten million a foreign-born mother and that the births in American-born families are constantly decreasing.

    It is the immigration of that element which is most opposed to the nativist puritanism i. e. the German element which is increasing the most.

    2

    The outlook for American nativism is the worst in the West. With the exception of Texas and Missouri immigration still completely ignores the South.

    German immigration is heaviest in the Northwest. The Irish immigration settles mostly in the East. German nationality is bound to exercise a great influence upon the formation of the future American national character, a greater influence than the Anglo-American knights of the clod and the Puritan blockheads are now dreaming of.

    For the American nativists, who consider Americanism as an already accomplished nationality and wish, consequently, to impose their ideals upon others, the census made in 1870 contains a serious lesson. ...

    German
    III G, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 08, 1873
    German Lady Teachers.

    The Board of Education is asking once more for German women teachers. Since the fire many vacancies have occurred. But the Board of Education was unable to fill all the vacancies.....Up to yesterday, there were five vacancies during the last four months. Inquiries were made at St. Louis and Milwaukee, but in neither these cities could women teachers be had.

    To appoint men teachers, instead, is not possible either. The positions do not pay a high enough salary to attract good teachers, and poor ones are not wanted. Besides that, American ideals disapprove the idea of a teacher going straight from the drawing-room to the school and vice-versa.

    2

    We thus wish to attract the attention of parents to the fact that German women teachers are in demand, and that teaching offers their daughters a well paid career. Should the Germans be unwilling, or unable, to furnish the teachers, Americans will become suspicious and wonder why Germans are asking for German instruction.

    The Board of Education is asking once more for German women teachers. Since the fire many vacancies have occurred. But the Board of Education was unable to fill all the ...

    German
    II A 1, I K, I A 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 11, 1873
    Other....Proposals by Altgeld.

    ....In regard to prison labor, he advocates that convicts should be attached to small industries, so that no competition with free labor may arise....

    (Translator's note)

    Recalling his pre-election promises: "Convict-contract labor is unconstitutional," it seems utterly incomprehensible to disregard one of his major promises upon which he rode into office.

    ....In regard to prison labor, he advocates that convicts should be attached to small industries, so that no competition with free labor may arise.... (Translator's note) Recalling his pre-election promises: ...

    German
    I H, IV, I F 3, I D 2 c
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 13, 1873
    [A New Comic Periodical]

    The Eulenspiegel, a comic paper published by Moritz Langeloth, will appear next Saturday for the first time. We quote from the editorial:

    "Let it be said, once for all, that the character of private people will not be spoken of in the Eulenspiegel. As gladly as we accept for our paper communications which deal with matters of general interest, we shall assign communications of any other type to the waste basket."

    Only when guided by such principles will a comic paper be able to be successful.

    The Eulenspiegel, a comic paper published by Moritz Langeloth, will appear next Saturday for the first time. We quote from the editorial: "Let it be said, once for all, that ...

    German
    II B 2 d 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 15, 1873
    A Run on the German Saving Bank.

    Like wild fire the news spread that Greenebaum's bank was bankrupt. From 10 a. m. until 3 p. m. the run was pretty brisk. Around 2 p. m., not less than 200 people were standing in line in order to take out their money. Upon the German National Bank the run had very little influence.

    The directors of the savings bank were all at their post as soon as the rumor was spread. There are indications that the rumor was originated maliciously. At any rate the savings bank is fully able to face the run.

    Like wild fire the news spread that Greenebaum's bank was bankrupt. From 10 a. m. until 3 p. m. the run was pretty brisk. Around 2 p. m., not less ...

    German
    II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 16, 1873
    The German Savings Bank Pays All its Claims.

    The run on the German Savings Bank continued yesterday and all the claims were paid promptly. The run on the German bank was different from the run which has taken place from time to time on other banks, in so far, as the people did not betray any anxiety. The business people never believed the rumors circulated concerning the bank and continued their financial transactions with the bank as usual. A German, Geo. Mentzel, withdrew yesterday his money from the National Commercial Bank to deposit it with the German Savings Bank. Also, yesterday, the clerk for the newly opened accounts had more to do than the one who was paying the claims.

    The origin of the rumor is still a mystery.

    The run on the German Savings Bank continued yesterday and all the claims were paid promptly. The run on the German bank was different from the run which has taken ...

    German
    II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 17, 1873
    [Use of German Language in Government]

    Senator Horace Waite asked that the message of the Governor of Illinois should be printed not only in English but also in German. The decision of the new State Constitution that all official documents should be published in English is taken word for word from the old Constitution.

    Now under the old Constitution, all the official documents were also published in German. Sufficient proof that this was not considered as being in violation of the Constitution.

    Of the seven state senators from Cook County, the American senators, Williamson, Waite and Dew, voted for the publication of official documents in foreign languages, while Senators Reynolds and Thompson and the Irish, McGrath and Kehoe, voted against it.

    Senator Horace Waite asked that the message of the Governor of Illinois should be printed not only in English but also in German. The decision of the new State Constitution ...

    German
    III A, I F 4
  • Chicago Times -- January 20, 1873
    (No headline)

    The society known to us as the "Turners" was founded in the year 1812. Chicago is the head parters of the national society, and has the executive authority, which includes the following prominent German citizens; Fr. Zachner, President; A. Gottleib, vice-president; W. Berblinger, H. Von Langen, secretaries; A. Furstenberg, treasurer; Charles Zotz, A. Oberndorff, Charles Mayer, directors.

    The society has a library of 1,000 volumes, comprising standard German authors. The initiation fee is but $5.00 and the annual dues $6 more. There is a special fund for the relief and care of the sick members. The society points with pride to the fact that it sent two companies to fight for the union, and that the men fought nobly, 24 of more of them dying under the stars and stripes.

    After the fire the society did not step to lament, but at once put up a temporary structure, somewhat like a huge shanty, wherein the usual meetings were continued. About $1,200 was invested in this "relief house". The society became the disburser of the German relief fund, distributing a large amount of money among the burnt-out Teutons, of whom there were thousands.

    2

    The dedication of the new Turn hall, built on the old side, places the society in fine quarters once more, and brings the history of their changes down to date.

    "Mens sana in corpore sana" was the old Latin maxim. With this saying of the stern old Roman in view, Vater Jahn founded his schools at the beginning of this century, encourage all the youth to join, and together with a sound, healthy body imbued the with liberal ideas, and when the great wars with Napoleon of 1813 and 1815 came he led them on to victory.

    Thus arose the Turner association. They have rapidly spread throughout Europe, and within the last quarter of a century have gained a strong foothold here upon our own continent, until they have spread into every small town, everywhere joining the very pivot about which all German-American sociability moves. And while the associations are originally German and partake principally of German characteristics, yet there is nothing in the organization itself at which any American can take offense.

    In this city there sprang from this organization numerous Turn-Vereins, not only German but Scandinavian and Bohemian. While these have their own halls also, the South Side Turn-Verein contemplates the speedy erection of a large 3and beautiful structure.

    As Vater Jahn introduced his school for gymnastic training at Berlin, out of which grew the entire movement, so here Yale and Harvard have a perfect system of gymnastics with an experienced teacher for the same.

    All Americans can join the Turn-Verein; it is not an exclusive German-American institution, in which the greatest liberty, in every respect, is allowed, where social intercourse is one of the great elements that go to make up the Turn-Verein.

    Another decade and the West will have made gigantic strides toward a freer mode of thinking, another score and the shores of New England will reverberate the echo as it comes from the West and another half century and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, from Maine to Florida, everywhere will be felt the benefits of the almagamation of the Teutonic element, for it has given the country strength, greater freedom, taught it the benefits of greater sociability, and bequeathed it to a firmer stability.

    "Gentlemen of the Chicago Turn-Gemeinde: Be ever mindful of your interests, let no political dissensions or petty discords ever distrub that unity and 4harmony of action that has always existed among you. Continue the good work begun. Hold forever sacred this hall, ever cherish it as your fondest hope. Be jealous of the honor of the association, that it may stand where it has always stood, the leading, the represent active Turn-Gemeinde of Chicago; but stop not here, push it forward until it occupies the first position in the country, until throughout the land is respected the watch word of the Turners: "Frisch, Fromm, Frei!"

    The society known to us as the "Turners" was founded in the year 1812. Chicago is the head parters of the national society, and has the executive authority, which includes ...

    German
    II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 22, 1873
    [Sunday Observance]

    Captain Gund has been attacked violently the last few days, because last Sunday he had not informed against the Turnhalle nor against any tavern keeper in his district. On account of that he was called to justify himself before Washburn. Captain Gund declared that he had seen no open saloons on the north side. He also stated that no drinks were sold nor consumed at the Turnhalle and that this is true, anyone who was there last Sunday can authenticate. It is said a few glasses of beer were drunk in the lower hall. Captain Gund, who was on service in the upper hall, could not have been aware of that. It is most contemptible to see newspapers open their columns to such news.

    Captain Gund has been attacked violently the last few days, because last Sunday he had not informed against the Turnhalle nor against any tavern keeper in his district. On account ...

    German
    I B 2, I C