The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 02, 1871
    [German Instruction in Public Schools]

    Extensive article about German instruction in public schools. (Mentions another article on the same topic that included statistical material and was "recently" published.)

    German teaching personnel consists of about a dozen women teachers. In St. Louis and Cincinnati number of German teachers three times higher, also number of children taking German considerably larger. In St. Louis German is a special study of the German children- in Chicago the instruction is calculated to profit both German and American children. In St. Louis children are taken into a separate room for German instruction. Children of various grades are divided into German classes according to their knowledge of German. The disadvantage of this system lies in the fact that the German children become separated from their American fellow pupils, and that the American children do not take German. In Chicago, the German teachers alternate from grade to grade, spending half an hour with each class. One Committee for Instruction in German of the Board of Education, wants German instruction to be an essential part of the schools.

    2

    Miss Morch in the Haven School(Wabash near 15, an aristocratic section) teaches German to 425 children of which only 50 are German (15 are "Irish or Colored") Miss Malwina Forster has Kinzie School, Ohio and La Salle, 320 children taking German, less than half of whom are Germans. Miss Anna A. Achert, Franklin School, "Division & Sedgwick Streets, 330; Miss Caroline Mc Fee, Washington School,(Indiana and Sangamon) 303; Marie L. W. Mc Clintock, Moseley School, 24th Street, 350; E. M. von Horn, Wells School, Reuben and Cornelia, 400; E. M. Alfeld, Skinner School, Jackson and Aberdeen, 210 of which all but 15 are Americans. Olivia M. Olson, Cottage Grove, Douglas Place, 118;(none of whom are Germans) Virginia von Horn, Carpenter, 2nd and Center Avenue, 406,(hardly a third German) Amanda Gimbel, LaSalle Primary, North of North Avenue, 450; Mathilde Kaun, Scammon, Madison near Halsted, 400, among them 100 Irish boys and girls.

    These statistics show that the idea of the Committee to win the Americans through their own children for"das Deutsche" (may be translated "The German language") as the German Cause,") has been proven right. The Committee seems to have thought that in the measure in which the German instruction lost its position of separateness may measure the resistance against it will cease. Only in one School (Skinner) one of the teachers is hostile to the German instruction, and his influence 3is so patent that no less than 40 pupils who had begun gave up German.

    German instruction in Chicago is not so well organized as in St. Louis. There one has a German "director" (Superintendent) who stands in the same relationship to the German teachers as the English "directors" to the English teachers. Here in Chicago, the work of the director of the German teachers lies on the hands of the Committee, and the Messrs. Schintz, Richberg and Wunsche are business men who cannot be as efficient as an especially appointed German director.

    Of the 20,000 pupils in Chicago, Public Schools, 3654 take German. A year ago only 1114 did.

    Extensive article about German instruction in public schools. (Mentions another article on the same topic that included statistical material and was "recently" published.) German teaching personnel consists of about a ...

    German
    I A 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 04, 1871
    [Lincoln School Needs a Teacher]

    Schintz of the Committee for German Instruction proposes at a Board of Education meeting to appoint a German teacher for the Lincoln School as the parents of 230 pupils have asked for instruction in German.

    Schintz of the Committee for German Instruction proposes at a Board of Education meeting to appoint a German teacher for the Lincoln School as the parents of 230 pupils have ...

    German
    I A 1 b
  • Chicago Times -- January 06, 1871
    Grant Versus Jussen

    In answer to the letter of Orville S. Grant, Esq. to President Grant, published in the morning papers, Col. E. Jussen, collector of internal revenue, has sent the following dispatch to the commissioner of internal revenue:

    "The Chicago papers published a letter purporting to have been written on June 18, 1870 by Orville S. Grant, Esq., to President Grant, charging me with corruptly suppressing a prosecution instituted against Kirchhoff & Co., distillers, for violation of the revenue laws. This charge, as well as every other direct or indirect insinuation against my integrity contained in said letter, is a malicious falsehood. The case against Kirchhoff & Co. is on the trial docket for the present term of the United States District Court. If the letter in question is genuine and published by authority, I respectfully demand an immediate investigation."

    Edmund Jussen

    Collector, First District of Illinois

    In answer to the letter of Orville S. Grant, Esq. to President Grant, published in the morning papers, Col. E. Jussen, collector of internal revenue, has sent the following dispatch ...

    German
    IV, I F 6
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 07, 1871
    Quarterly Meeting of the German Society

    The Agent Anneke presents new statutes for the Society that are then discussed.

    Name: "German Society of Chicago, Illinois,"

    Aim of the Society: To assist, advise and inform immigrants, giving them, if necessary , legal, and medical assistance. To help them in finding work, or to locate lost baggage, or to support them with money.

    By the term "German Immigrants" also Hollanders, Bohemians, Poles and Hungarians shall be understood, because these people have no representation of their nationality in Chicago, and it is hoped that this will influence their countrymen to join the Society.

    The Agent Anneke presents new statutes for the Society that are then discussed. Name: "German Society of Chicago, Illinois," Aim of the Society: To assist, advise and inform immigrants, giving ...

    German
    II D 10, I C, II D 7, II D 8
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 08, 1871
    [The Turners Establish a School]

    The Chicago Turn-Gemeinde announces the opening of a Sunday School of 2 semesters beginning January 1st, and July 1st. Children to pay $2.00, adults $4.00 per semester. For members of the Turn-gemeinde free of charge. Instruction is in German, every Sunday morning, in the Turn-Halle(Gymnasium) on the Northside.

    Subjects to be taught: 1 Drawing, 2 Kalegraphy, 3 Arithmetic, 4 Geometry, 5 Rethoric and stylistic, 6 fundaments of music.

    The Chicago Turn-Gemeinde announces the opening of a Sunday School of 2 semesters beginning January 1st, and July 1st. Children to pay $2.00, adults $4.00 per semester. For members of ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III A, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 09, 1871
    [The Turner Community Sunday School]

    Report of the actual opening of the Sunday School of the Turngemeinde. The first speaker of the Turngemeinde, Carl Lotz, addressed almost a hundred prospective students and 40 representatives of all the Turnvereine of Illinois.

    Report of the actual opening of the Sunday School of the Turngemeinde. The first speaker of the Turngemeinde, Carl Lotz, addressed almost a hundred prospective students and 40 representatives of ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III A, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 12, 1871
    [A Militia Regiment to Be Organized]

    Meeting in Denmark Hall (Milwaukee Avenue) of Germans and Norwegians respecting a militia regiment to be created in Chicago. The State will pay only $12.50 for each uniform. Two committees formed to collect money for more handsome uniforms. The Germans want an exact copy of a Russian uniform for their Company, and Consul Claussenius has already written to the Russian ministry of War for a complete sample.

    Herr Ostermann announces a "beneficium" for the "Prussian uniform"-the Turnhalle Vorwarts.

    Meeting in Denmark Hall (Milwaukee Avenue) of Germans and Norwegians respecting a militia regiment to be created in Chicago. The State will pay only $12.50 for each uniform. Two committees ...

    German
    III D, I G, I C, III H, III A, III B 2
  • Chicago Times -- January 14, 1871
    Chicago Colorado Colony

    A large meeting of the Chicago Colorado colony was held last evening in Arcade Hall.

    The Rev. Robert Collyer, president of the colony, in calling the meeting to order, expressed his satisfaction with the idea of the colony, saying if it was carried out as it ought to be, and as he believed it would be, it would be one of the best movements ever started. There could be no doubt that there were large cities to be founded in the west, and a company going out to settle could found a village with schools, etc., necessary to an advanced civilization. He alluded to the trials of individuals when they settled alone on the public lands.

    W. M. Byers, the first man to take a press to Colorado, was then introduced. He pointed to a map on the blackboard, showing Denver, Cheyenne, the Black Hills, and the course of the railroad between them, and the site of the Greely colony on the Cache La Poudre River. He alluded to the Chicago German colony, which now has 50,000 acres ready for irrigation, and 150,000 acres more in course of preparation.

    At the close of his lecture, a vote of thanks was extended to him, after which the meeting adjourned , when a number of persons subscribed to the articles of the colony.

    A large meeting of the Chicago Colorado colony was held last evening in Arcade Hall. The Rev. Robert Collyer, president of the colony, in calling the meeting to order, expressed ...

    German
    III G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 16, 1871
    [Dr. Von Holst to Lecture]

    Announcement of forthcoming lectures by Dr. Von Holst. Year before he spoke about American History and found enthusiastic applause.

    After six lectures on "Pictures out of the History of French Depotism," he will go on to Milwaukee where he is to lecture three times.

    Announcement of forthcoming lectures by Dr. Von Holst. Year before he spoke about American History and found enthusiastic applause. After six lectures on "Pictures out of the History of French ...

    German
    IV, I E, II B 2 g
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 17, 1871
    [Relief for the German Soldiers Wounded in the War]

    Everywhere complaints about the slowness of collections for the German wounded. In Detroit and Pittsburgh they have come to a complete standstill. Some reports on the evils prevailing- the Prussian system of caring for the army in the field have been taken by many people as excuse before their own conscience to do nothing further.

    "Should the enthusiasm for the sake of the old fatherland have burn down like a straw fire?" "We will not hope so!" exclaime the Pittsburgh Volkstatt. We fear it did.

    Everywhere complaints about the slowness of collections for the German wounded. In Detroit and Pittsburgh they have come to a complete standstill. Some reports on the evils prevailing- the Prussian ...

    German
    II D 10, I G, III H