The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 06, 1870
    Mass Meeting in Farwell Hall

    Persuant to an appeal published in the Illinois Staats-Zeitung yesterday, a large number of Germans assembled in Farwell Hall to express their sympathies in respect to the late events of the War. Despite torrential rains the large hall was well filled by 8:30 P. M. There was little time to decorate the hall appropriately, since the meeting was impromptu but the enthusiam displayed by the assembly made up for the lack of pomp and show.

    Mr. Claussenius called the meeting to order after the band had played "Heil Dir Im Siegerkranz" as effectively as was possible while 1800 to 2000 people gave vent to their feelings by thunderous applause. The enthusiasm evoked by the national song was a worthy introduction to the program.

    Mr. Claussenius stated that he had been requested by the executive board 2of the Young Ladies' Society [? for the Aid of Factory Workers] and by the finance committee to call a mass meeting of German citizens of Chicago as soon as the first battle between Germany and France had been fought.

    "That battle has now taken place," he said, "and the Germans were the victors. Although it was not an important or a decisive victory, to us who anxiously followed every move made by our brothers on the Rhine, the news of this victory was prophetic--glad news which has awakened in us the glad hope and confidence that Germany will ultimately win the War. And our purpose in meeting is to give expression to these sentiments. Mr. Claussenius then made a motion to elect a chairman.

    Caspar Butz was unanimously chosen. He took the chair and made an address 3that was very favorably received and loudly applauded. The text of Mr. Butz' speech follows:

    "On that memorable and glorious day--memorable and glorious because of the important steps we then took--on July 17, when we last met in the North Side Turner Hall, the mantle of the prophet seemed to have fallen upon me, as I read the message of German victory in your enraptured eyes. Germany has shown that she is not unworthy of the words of praise that we uttered then and the enthusiasm which all of us displayed; she has lived up to the expectations of her sons who are scattered over the entire world. 'Tis true, the victory was not a decisive one: the battle which will force the French back into Paris must still be fought. But it was a victory, a victory which created in us the living hope, the firm conviction that our former fatherland will finally 4overcome her old foe, France--a victory that has dispelled from our hearts all uncertainity, all doubt in regard to the outcome of the War.

    "Germany has entered upon a dangerous and difficult course. Every report from our former country assures us that the Germans are well aware of the importance and the seriousness of the war which has been forced upon them. However, the joy of great confidence is tempered with that serious mood, and the certainty of ultimate victory with the knowledge of the importance of the conflict. Though the way lead over many rocks, through fire, bloodshed, death, and destruction, that it will end in victory, unity, and freedom for Germany is the hope, the firm conviction, of millions of Germans here and abroad.

    "The two centuries during which we, the slaves of Europe, sat within and performed the mental work of the world, have passed. Having conquered the world of thought, Germany now enters the material world to assume her position 5among the nations of the earth. She has given the world enough men of great intellect, and now she is ready to enforce her demand for the material things of which she was unjustly deprived some centuries ago. In order to regain possession of the land which France plundered she is demanding that this stolen property be returned, not by uttering 'highfaluting' phrases, but, as becomes the nation founded by Frederick the Great, by resorting to cannon and bayonet.

    "This War is not only a battle against the Corsican who usurped the throne of France; it has a greater and much wider and deeper significance. Through the thunder of the battle on the Rhine we hear the voice of a united, greater Germany, and the blood streaming from the wounds of thousands of brave men is the bloody baptism through which Germany will be regenerated, will become free, will be united. Do not be deceived, my fellow citizens; that is the real significance of this terrible conflict.

    "However, since blood has begun to flow, let us not forget to perform the 6grave duty which we once assumed. We vowed that we would care for the widows and orphans of the brave soldiers who sacrifice their lives fighting for the cause of Germany, and we shall keep that vow.

    For a long time there was doubt that war would break out. The Battle of Weissenburg has removed every possible doubt. That is the only importance which the news of this Battle has for some; but the majority of our great American nation received the news as the glad realization of a most cherished wish. The American people are on our side; they sympathize with the Germans, although they are aware that the latter are ruled by a king; they hope that the men who are fighting under the red and white flag will emerge victorious; Americans feel instinctively that liberty, civilization, and human progress depend upon the outcome of this War, and they value these essentials very highly.

    "Why should we care, even if a few people do deny what the whole world admits? 7A few days ago some Danish citizens of our city held a meeting in which they expressed great fear that their beloved Scandinavia would be endangered if Prussia wins the War. Well, one cannot blame them, if their recollection of what happened at Dueppel prevents them from forgetting old grudges. But I appeal to you people from Schleswick-Holstein. You know that an effort is being made to bring Schleswick-Holstein under Danish jurisdiction again. Now, although I did not come from Schleswick-Holstein, but from Westphalia, for twenty-five years I sang 'Schleswig-Holstein. Meerumschlungen' [Schleswick-Holstein Surrounded by the Sea]; for twenty-five years I have shared the hopes of the people of Schleswick-Holstein that these two duchies would not be separated. They were German and they will remain German, an inseparable part of a united, great Germany!"

    After this address had been made Mr. George Schneider was elected vice-president, and Mr. C. F. Jung secretary. Vaas' Orchestra then played "Schleswig-Holstein 8Meerumschlungen".

    [Translator's note: Reverend Hartmann, Mr. H. Michalis, Mr. Emil Dietsch, Mr. George Schneider, and Mr. E. C. Salomon also spoke at this meeting, however, they added no new ideas, but merely repeated thoughts which had been expressed by the first speaker, Caspar Butz. Therefore I did not translate their speeches.]

    Persuant to an appeal published in the Illinois Staats-Zeitung yesterday, a large number of Germans assembled in Farwell Hall to express their sympathies in respect to the late events of ...

    German
    I G, IV, I E, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 09, 1870
    Delegates of German Societies of Chicago Hold Meeting

    The second meeting of delegates of German societies met last evening in Germania Hall which is located in Uhlich's Block.

    Mr. Claussenius presided and Mr. C. Wenborne acted as secretary. Unfortunately the attendance at this second meeting was also very sparse. Besides the societies which sent delegates to the first meeting, the Orpheus Chorus and the Order of Red Men were represented in this meeting, the former by Mr. Wilhelm Richter, and the latter by Mr. C. Bierbrauer.

    After the chairman had made a few brief remarks regarding his appeal and the meeting that was held in Farwell Hall, Mr. Degenhardt (sic) pointed out that the purpose of the meeting was perhaps misunderstood by some, that it had been left to the individual organizations to elect committees for the purpose 2of receiving donations, and that, in some instances, ignorance prevailed concerning the intended disposition of the money that is being collected.

    He said there were rumors as a result of which some people were under the impression that contributions would be used to purchase warships or to organize and equip a regiment of volunteers, and that such unfounded reports were greatly impairing the work of the various societies. He emphasized the fact that contributions would be used for benevolent purposes. He then proposed that the members present name the men whom their organizations had appointed to serve as delegates. The proposal was adopted unanimously. The following is a list of societies and their representatives: Chicago Turngemeinde: Peter Hand, Arthur Erbe, J. Kaufmann;

    Germania Turnverein: Charles Werkmeister, Wilhelm Potratz, Joseph Miehle;

    3

    Schleswig-Holsteinischer Verein: Mr. A. Braun, Mr. F. Hinrichs, Mr. P. Sacher, Mr. A. Westphal; Germania Maennerchor: Mr. H. Seiler, Mr. T. Thieme, Mr. P. Heine, Mr. A. Pemiger; Aurora Turnverein: Mr. A. Fuerstenberg, Mr. Charles Peters, Hamburger Club: Mr. S. Sommer, Mr. S. Gumprecht, Mr. A. Frank; Concordia Maennerchor: Mr. E. Schloesser, Mr. P. Schumann, Mr. S. Groscurth; German employees of the Union Hide and Leather Company: Christian Bartmann.

    An American who was present asked permission to speak; it was granted amid great applause. He stated that he could not speak in German and would have to address the assembly in his mother tongue. He declared that he felt called upon to express his sympathy and that of many other Americans; that they had not forgotten that many Germans fought for the cause of the Union in the Civil War, and had rendered very valuable services on the battlefield. He expressed his hope that the German flag would soon be waving from the towers of Paris! He was cheered enthusiastically.

    4

    On recommendation of Mr. Dietzsch and Mr. Lotz it was decided to again issue an invitation to all German societies and lodges, and thus to leave nothing undone in an attempt to acquire the participations of all Germans, especially the laggards.

    The chairman was authorized to call a special meeting if necessary. A regular meeting will be held next Monday.

    The second meeting of delegates of German societies met last evening in Germania Hall which is located in Uhlich's Block. Mr. Claussenius presided and Mr. C. Wenborne acted as secretary. ...

    German
    III B 4, III D, III B 2, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 22, 1870
    Report of the Chicago Sick Benefit Association (August 1, 1869 to August 1, 1870)

    Receipts

    Cash in treasury on August 1, 1869....................................................$3,728.92

    Premiums, policies, and admission fees..............................................14,119.31

    For funerals............................................................................... 474.00

    Interest.................................................................................... 274.41

    Drawn from treasury..................................................................... 2,150.08

    Agents' arrearages....................................................................... 1,458.07

    Total....................................................................................... $22,204.79

    Disbursements

    Sick Benefits.............................................................................. $8,311.13

    Dividends.................................................................................. 337.50

    Salaries..................................................................................... 1,723.33

    2

    Revenue stamps, advertisements, etc.........................$3,221.20

    Deposited in treasury............................................. 1,151.33

    Funerals............................................................. 351.00

    Commissions....................................................... 2,577.97

    Total................................................................$17,672.46 (sic)

    Cash in treasury...................................................$2,853.25

    Cash in hands of secretary....................................... 60.30

    Cash in hands of agents........................................... 1,453.07

    Notes................................................................. 160.71

    Total all disbursements.............................................$22,204.79

    Assets

    Cash in treasury......................................................$2,853.25

    Cash in hands of secretary.......................................... 60.30

    Cash in hands of agents.............................................. 1,453.07

    3

    Materials......................................$400.00

    Notes..........................................160.71

    Appliances and books....................... 493.30

    Total...........................................$5,425.63 (sic)

    Liabilities..................................... 242.10

    Total net worth..............................$5,183.53 (sic)

    Membership on August 1, 1869.............1,026

    Received into membership................. 531

    Memberships cancelled...................... 497

    Membership on August 1, 1870.............. 1,060

    Ten hundred and sixty members (among them 21 women) were sick a total of 6,623.7 weeks and received $8,311.13 in sick benefits, averaging $31.36 per person or $12.55 per week, while during the previous year 133 persons were sick 3,404.7 weeks and received $12.79 per week, or $32.76 per person.

    4

    The total benefit payments made to 265 persons over a period of 6,623.7 weeks amounted to $8,311.13. Benefits paid since July 28, 1865 amounted to $12,667.83.

    In accordance with a resolution passed August 14, 1869, rates for new members were increased 15 per cent; the old members pay the original rates. It is in the interest of the Association that all members, old and new, pay the prevailing rates. [Translator's note: This sentence lacks clarity. It was translated verbatim.]

    C. Knobelsdorff, President

    W. Katerbau, Secretary.

    This is to certify that we have compared the above report with the records of the secretary and have found them to agree in every respect.

    Chicago, Illinois, August 18, 1870;

    The Finance Committee:

    William S. Golsen,

    5

    Herrmann Kaestner,

    Louis Blohm.

    Receipts Cash in treasury on August 1, 1869....................................................$3,728.92 Premiums, policies, and admission fees..............................................14,119.31 For funerals............................................................................... 474.00 Interest.................................................................................... 274.41 Drawn from treasury..................................................................... 2,150.08 Agents' arrearages....................................................................... 1,458.07 Total....................................................................................... $22,204.79 Disbursements Sick Benefits..............................................................................

    German
    II D 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 23, 1870
    Patrictic German Ladies' Aid Society Contributions to Fair

    The following contributions in money and goods were made through the members named below:

    Mrs. F. A. Hoffmann:

    Cash............................$440.00

    Goods (monetary value)...... 521.50

    Mrs. H. Claussenius:

    Cash...........................$348.00

    Goods.......................... 486.00

    Mrs. Clara Schneider:

    Cash............................$24.65

    Goods............................ 8.00

    Mrs. Hevermann:

    Cash........................... $64,60

    Goods..........................165.15

    Total all contributions (cash and goods)....$2,057.90

    The following contributions in money and goods were made through the members named below: Mrs. F. A. Hoffmann: Cash............................$440.00 Goods (monetary value)...... 521.50 Mrs. H. Claussenius: Cash...........................$348.00 Goods.......................... 486.00 Mrs. ...

    German
    II D 10, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 25, 1870
    A Statement to the People of the United States Issued by the Delegates to the Convention of the German Patriotic Aid Association of the Union

    When Louis Napoleon put an end to the French Republic, he considered it necessary that the French people approve of this act of violence. The president became emperor "by the grace of God and the will of the French people." Thus he claimed that God approved of the perjury which he committed, and that the French people wished that the will of the traitor to the French Republic should thereafter be the will of the French people. So the Second Empire was founded on an infamous lie, and legitimitized itself from the outset as the genuine successor to the First Empire; for the whole history of the Napoleons is proof of the fact that the entire Napoleonic system is based upon a gross falsehood. The first Napoleon represented himself as the standard-bearer of the French Republic which always claimed that it was wont to fight only in self defense. Napoleon III said, "Imperial rule is equivalent to peace." However, during the reign of Napoleon I, as well as during the reign of 2Napoleon III, the history of France is a nearly continuous succession of wars of offense. The Napoleons established their rule by military force and maintained it by sword and cannon. Imperial rule is equivalent to war, for the glory of war is the only basis on which the reign of the Napoleons can rest. Only when France can prescribe laws for other nations can she forget the disgrace resulting from the fact that she knows only obedience on her own soil. Napoleon I and Napoleon III both declared publicly that France could dictate laws to the other nations of Europe only if Germany were weak and disunited.

    History has proved the truth of that statement once, and is about to do so again. The world dominion of Napoleon I collapsed when the German people, defying the wish of most German rulers, rebelled; and now all Germany, united under able leaders, is opposing the tottering power of Napoleon III. There can be no doubt about the result. It was Napoleon himself who said, "A great nation that is fighting for a just cause is invincible." However, in France there is much dissension; it is the emperor who is doing the fighting, and his 3cause is criminal, for it is he who is attacking without a reason for doing so, solely for the purpose of cementing his tottering empire together for his son--with German blood. Only on the German side are the people, a united people, fighting for a just cause, for they are defending their honor and their land. The King of Prussia is merely the unanimously recognized leader of the German people. From the moment France declared war, there has been only one Germany, and in this one Germany there is only one party, the German party. Whatever differences individuals or parties have to settle among themselves, or with their rulers, have been put aside until it has been made impossible for the French emperor to force himself upon the German people as absolute judge of all German affairs.

    What a nation needs most is independence, since it can be or become really free only if it is independent; this freedom must be won, it cannot be given, least of all by a foreign despot. Therefore, the sympathy of all Germans, even of the Republicans and of the Martyrs of the Revolution of 1848, are 4with the German National Army which is led by the most powerful German rulers, because the principal right of the German people, their complete independence of the arrogant dictates of the rulers of other nations, can be accomplished only under that leadership. However, although the people need that leadership, yet, as far as Germany is concerned, the war is not dynastic, that is, it is not a war for the promotion of the interests of the present German rulers, but a people's war in the full sense of the word. This fact is realized and acknowledged by both the German rulers and by the German people, and, therefore, both rulers and people are presenting a united front.

    Thus Napoleon III completed what Napoleon I began; his desire for conquest has welded torn Germany together--against his wish or intentions. Germany, once voluntarily united, will always remain united, and a united Germany is the most reliable guaranty for the peace of all Europe, since it would erect a wide rampart against those nations whose greed is the principal cause of fear; a wall that would afford sufficient protection for the weak and innocent 5and, owing to the character of the people who erect it, would be sufficient security that the rights of neighboring states will be respected. German princes, like many other princes of Europe, have followed a policy of conquest; but the German people had only one intention, one object--to live in peace on their soil. However, if Germany is united, then the people must dictate her future policies.

    Only because nature planted the desire for freedom so deeply into the heart of Germans, did they struggle against being amalgamated, just as Americans, during the early history of the Republic, fought against submission to a strong centralized common government; and rulers of Germany were able to put their will above the will of the people only because the latter were divided. The jealousy prevailing among the various tribes was the fire by which the princes forged the chains by which the people were held in bondage. The history of the year 1866 is irrefutable proof of that fact. The first thing the king of Prussia did, after peace had been concluded, was to ask the people's representatives to grant him immunity against the penalty for those of his 6acts which were contrary to the constitution. In Prussia, as it was prior to 1866, the king could have made his will the sole law of the country; but after 1866 the Prussian king was subject to the law as embodied in the constitution. However, if half of Germany was able to obtain this concession from the Victor of Sodowa, no future ruler will have sufficient power and influence to defy entire Germany.

    So no matter from what standpoint we view the Franco Prussian War, our desire must be that Germany win, unless our judgment is impaired by prejudice, selfishness, or jealousy. Even though the French people make the cause of their emperor their own, that will not change matters in the least. France is responsible for the acts of Napoleon, having served as his willing tools for nearly two decades, and having approved his policies and deeds, while qualified to sit in judgment of them. According to justice and right, the French must, therefore, bear the consequences, and the whole civilized world must sympathize, not with France, but with Germany.

    7

    The American nation has many more, and much weightier reasons to do so. The United States was the first nation to lay down the two principles that government is not invested in rulers, but in the governed--the people--and that no nation has a right to interfere with the affairs of another nation. These two principles constitute the foundation of modern constitutional law, and Germany is defending them in this war. Napoleon presumed to prescribe, to the Spanish people, to whom they might offer the crown of Spain, and he has assumed the authority of dictating, to the king of Prussia, whom the latter must forbid to accept the Spanish crown. He has just as much right to do so as he had to tell the Mexicans whom they were to choose as their ruler. The United States objected to, and frustrated, Napoleon's "Mexican plan," because our country could not tolerate a violation of the afore-mentioned principles on the American continent. Can we Americans find a justification for Napoleon's late command, without being inconsistent and untrue to American principles?

    However, the question of succession to the Spanish crown was merely a pretext 8for war; the real causes of the war are to be found in the results of the Battle of Sodowa. France's claim that she was the foremost among the great powers of Europe was questioned, and Napoleon feared that Prussia would become even more powerful. This fear was well founded, for the conduct of Southern Germans proved that they were by no means opposed to the change in Prussia's position in Germany; but is Germany obliged to remain a weak nation, just because the Napoleons can maintain their status as emperors only as long as France is the most powerful country of Europe? Perhaps Napoleon sympathizes with the Rebels (Confederates), because the Republic's rise to such gigantic power obscures the glory of the Empire. And does the chimera called "balance of European power" alter the matter even one whit? Just as nobody would have a right to interfere if the United States should become more powerful than all of the countries of Europe combined, so nobody has cause for just complaint, or a right to interfere, should Germany become the most powerful nation of Europe, as long as she did not increase her power at the expense of other nations. In dynastic interests, the princes of Europe have invented this system of artificial balance, which 9makes it necessary to regulate the scale every day. The peoples of Europe do not need this balance, for their interests are inseparably connected with, and dependent upon, an uninterrupted peace, a peace that is not wrought or maintained by the power of arms. Only the Napoleonic system of armed peace makes it necessary to use might to keep one nation within a certain limit of power, because another nation cannot keep pace with another nation's rate of economic development. It may profit princes to weaken neighboring countries, but the interests of the people of one nation are better served when the people of all other nations progress in every respect. The more the history of princes becomes the history of the people, and the history of the people becomes the history of the world, the more the term "balance of power" will become a meaningless phrase. Anybody who uses the brutal power of the sword to revive the chimera is an enemy of mankind, and anybody who destroys it will do the world a great service. The Napoleons must preserve this balance--as they understand it--at all events, even though they would have to fight a world war every year, for their throne will fall as soon as the "balance" of France is a notch below that of the 10other nations. The United States, on the other hand, has done more to prepare the way for the realization of true cosmopolitanism. Can Americans, then, sympathize with those whose entire political system (according to its innermost nature) demands that the barbarous medieval ideas that are opposed to freedom and all other interests of free people be preserved by the application of violent measures?

    Thus, Germany is fighting for those principles on which the whole history of America hinges. And there is not even one circumstance which could make it difficult for America to live up to her principles, while there are many good reasons why she should act in accordance with her convictions, as far as that is possible, without violating her neutrality laws. Some American news-papers have not been ashamed to conjure up the ghosts of those "Hessians" who fought on the side of England in the Revolutionary War, to prejudice our people against Germany. Do they not know, or do they not want to know, that those unfortunate Hessians were sold like cattle and forced to take up arms, and that not only the prominent men of Germany, like Schubert and Schiller, 11but also the entire German nation, condemned and execrated this crime? Is it right to make the present people of Germany responsible for the abominable acts which some German "noblemen" committed more than a hundred years ago? And then those newspapers contrast Lafayette and Louis XVI of France with those Hessians, to remind Americans of the "gratitude" which they owe France. But they say not a word about the Germans, who had settled in America before the Revolutionary War, and who fought side by side with the Americans during the entire war; they say not a word about von Steuben and DeKalb; not a word about Frederick The Great, the first, the best, and the truest friend of the struggling Republic. They glorify that momentary alliance made by jealous cousins for political reasons, and are silent about the harmony which existed among brothers for more than a hundred years, and which was disturbed for only a short time by unscrupulous, infamous dealers in human flesh. The French aided America only once, because it was to their advantage to do so; but time and again they caused our country great distress, in fact so great was that distress that even Washington and the misguided people felt that the hitherto 12imperturbable mutual confidence was faltering. And why refer to the musty past when the great deeds of yesterday are vivid in our memory? Who was it that wept and laughed with the Republic, while it was fighting for its very existence? And who was it that tried to undermine the very foundation of our country, and did everything possible to bring about the fall of the Union? We Americans of German descent fought with your native Americans from the battle of Bull Run to the battle of Appomattox, we bled with you, we conquered with you. And we do not ask your gratitude, for we know that we did no more than we were obligated to do as citizens of our beloved country. However, we expect you to sympathize with us, just as we felt toward you with every fiber of our being when the preservation of the Union was at stake. And the cause for which war is now being waged abroad concerns us personally. The men who are giving their lives in this cause are blood of our blood, and they are sacrificing themselves so that the graves of our fathers shall not be desecrated, and that our brothers may be independent and free. Do you expect us to be indifferent toward the outcome of this war, because we have become citizens of another country, and 13are safe? Woe unto this country, if that were the case, for anyone who can stifle his feeling for the land of his birth and youth, can have no feeling for his adopted country. And even though we have only done our duty as American citizens, can America forget the nation that gave her moral support when she was in very great danger?

    During the Civil War, Napoleon ordered that no American bonds should be quoted on the stock exchange of Paris; in Germany even tradesmen and laborers used their pitifully small life's savings to buy them,for they were convinced that right and justice and liberty would finally win. If there are some who find the afore-stated facts inadequate to guide them in choosing between the present belligerents, let them be persuaded at least by their own interests, and they cannot fail to make the correct decision. England and France sided with the Rebels; the former because she considered that step to be of advantage to her manufacturers, and the latter, because Napoleon again was dreaming of an empire; Germany at once took sides with the cause of justice and liberty, and her judgment proved to be correct, despite Bull Run and all the other battles 14which the North lost. America will do well to follow this example, no matter how the fortunes of this war change from day to day. However, disregarding the final result, which will undoubtedly be in favor of Germany, America's immediate economic interests make it desirable that Germany be victorious. Heretofore, Germany has sent 100,000 immigrants to America every year. This valuable addition to our population, which was essential to the development of the West from a wilderness into rich rural communities, has come to a standstill during this war. The United States was deprived of an immense source of money and man power, which would still be available, if Napoleon had let matters take their natural course. And this rich fountain of wealth will flow again in wonted streams only if Germany triumphs. 'Tis true, immigration would gradually begin again, even if France should win; but few Germans would come to America. Thousands upon thousands, who would like to settle here, would be prevented from doing so because they would not have the money to pay for transportation; and thousands would be beggars when they landed, and soon would become public charges. But the saddest feature of an eventual French victory would be the fact that 15the Germans, who would come to the United States, would be gloomy and dejected in spirit, and thus would be unable to do effective pioneering. After the War of Independence the United States became a prosperous and thriving nation, not because some oppressive laws were abolished, but because every citizen went about his duties cheerfully. Anybody who has been successful in one undertaking will feel the urge to seek new laurels in other fields of endeavor; but once a person is dejected in spirit, he will find it difficult to regain cheerfulness. If Germany wins the war, every future German immigrant will be worth three from a defeated Germany.

    Thus America is bound to the cause of Germany by national principles, by more than a hundred years of peaceful relations, and by economic interests. We do not expect the United States to enter the war. Peace is the life-sustaining air of a nation. Germany's cause is a just one, because she was forced to take up arms to restore peace, which Napoleon wantonly broke. We would be the first earnestly to advise against participating in the war, and 16have made it a strict rule to observe our American neutrality laws while aiding our former fatherland in caring for needy German soldiers and their widows and orphans. Americans, too, can make effective demonstration of their sympathy without transgressing any of our neutrality laws. The Napoleons have always been, and will always be put to shame, because in all their calculations they ignore the great power of moral sense. Man's innate perception of right and wrong, and not gun, cannon, and sword will decide this war. The more plainly and forcefully the world pronounces its judgment in favor of the Germans, the more firmly the latter will be convinced that, in defending their own country, they are fighting for the cause of the entire world.

    And the moral support of no other country can be of as much value to them as that of America, which was the first nation to take up arms in the cause of justice and liberty. If America's opinion concerning the cause and purpose of this war agrees with German opinion, then history has pronounced its judgment on this conflict in advance. Now, if the cause for which Germany 17is fighting is your cause, as it is ours, then help us in our efforts to assist those who are sacrificing their lives and the happiness of their families in behalf of that cause. Do not close your hands, now, for they have always been open when it was a matter of soothing pain or drying tears. You know from experience how bravely and well a soldier will fight, when he knows that the wounded in hospitals and the widows and orphans of men who have lost their lives in battle are cared for. The knowledge of having helped where help was necessary will be sufficient incentive to join us in our benevolent endeavors. Naturally, the moral and material support which America gives to Germany will be richly rewarded, for this war can end only with the destruction of all Napoleonic ideas, and the creation of a united Germany; and thus peace will be restored in Europe 18for years and even decades.

    Edmund Juessen,

    Doctor von Holst,

    Caspar Butz,

    A. Rosenthal,

    Doctor Wilhelm Taussig.

    Committee on Resolutions.

    Chicago, August 19, 1870.

    When Louis Napoleon put an end to the French Republic, he considered it necessary that the French people approve of this act of violence. The president became emperor "by the ...

    German
    I G, IV, I J, I C, III H, III G, III F, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 30, 1870
    The Fair Opens Farwell Mall Beautifully Decorated

    [Translator's note: The first seven paragraphs of this article are an appeal to the public to co-operate with the German Patriotic Aid Society by attending and purchasing articles at a fair, held for the benefit of wounded German soldiers of their widows and orphans. This part of the article is irrelevant.]

    The following committees and salesladies have been appointed by the central committee:

    First table

    Finance committee: Miss M. Hinrichs, Mrs. G. Pruessing, Mrs. G. Lippmann.

    Salesladies: Miss. Emeline Kurth, Mrs. B. Leon, Mrs. O. Horwitz, Miss I. Lackner, Miss Clara Hinrichs.

    2

    Second table

    Finance committee: Mrs. E. Juessen, Mrs. P. Campbell, Mrs. C. Mueller.

    Salesladies: Miss B. Florsheim, Miss E. Juessen, Mrs. B. Mueller, Mrs. N. Greenbaum.

    Third table

    Finance committee: Mrs. J. Polatscheck, Mrs. C. Jordan, Mrs. D. Anderson.

    Salesladies: Miss M. Polatscheck, Miss A. Richberg, Miss. P. Staab, Mrs. O. Clare, Mrs. C. Reed.

    Fourth table

    Finance committee: Miss F. Somme, Miss P. Hepp, Mrs. D. Engel.

    3

    Salesladies: Miss H. Assendorf, Mrs. W. Molter, Mrs. O. Stolz, Miss M. Oertel.

    Fifth table

    Finance committee: Mrs. C. Goodkind, Mrs. P. Reinhold, Mrs. D. Schmidt, Mrs. E. Wothenow.

    Salesladies: Mrs. G. Hevermann, Miss R. Mertle, Miss F. Melms, Miss C. Hochbaum, Miss A. Mannheimer, Miss H. Shaberg, Mrs. A. Kirchhoff.

    Sixth table

    Finance committee: Miss M. Heinrichs, Mrs. D. Bluthardt, Mrs. A. Magnus.

    Salesladies: Mrs. P. Knadler, Miss H. Meyer, Miss D. Friedberg, Miss M. Telschow.

    4

    Seventh table

    Finance committee: Mrs. F. Hoffmann, Mrs. O. Goldschmidt, Miss C. Kurz.

    Salesladies: Miss L. Hartmann, Miss H. Kahl, Mrs. P. Baum, Mrs. A. Loeb, Mrs. M. Meyer.

    Eight table

    Finance committee: Miss D. Kirchner, Mrs. J. Bertrand, Miss L. Mehrle.

    Salesladies: Miss G. Oppenheimer, Miss F. Huschle, Miss M. Hevermann, Miss K. Saum

    Ninth table

    Finance committee: Mrs. C. Vocke, Mrs. O. Thiele, Mrs. F. Frese.

    5

    Salesladies: Mrs. M. Lichtenhein, Miss A. Unna, Miss L. Manigold, Miss P. Cassel.

    Tenth table

    Finance committee: Mrs. E. Knipke, Miss E. Metzke, Miss L, Juessen.

    Salesladies: Mrs. A. Steiger, Miss E. Suss, Miss C. Hahler, Miss B. Mannheimer, Miss M. Reitler.

    The parade in which the local Italian societies will participate promises to be very impressive.

    Order of the parade

    First division

    6

    Meeting place: Randolph Street and Michigan Avenue.

    Order

    Police

    National Guard

    Company B. National Guard

    Great Western Light Guard Band

    Marshals and Adjutants

    Chicago Turngemeinde

    Union Turnverein

    Aurora Turnverein

    Vorwaerts Turnverein

    Germaina Turnverein

    Chicago Schuetzenverein

    West Side Schuetzenverein

    7

    Second division

    Meeting place: Michigan Avenue and Washington Street.

    Order

    Freier Saengerbund

    Germania Maennerchor

    Concordia Maennerchor

    Arion Gesangverein

    Orpheus Gesangverein

    Frohsinn Gesangverein

    Teutonia Gesangverein

    Schleswig-Holstein Verein

    Hamburger Club

    Frohsinn Geselliger Verein

    Berliner Humoristischer Club

    Union Veteranen Unterstuetzungs Verein

    Arbeiter Verein

    8

    Third division

    Meeting place: Wabash Avenue and Washington Street.

    Order

    Order of Hermannssoehnf

    All Orders of Chaldaeer

    Teutonia Lodge, #96, Harugari

    Harmonia Lodge, #130, Harugari

    Concordia Lodge, #15

    Independent Order of Red Men

    Robert Blum Lodge, #6

    Goethe Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows

    Northwestern Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows

    Knights of Pythias, Humboldt Lodge, #2

    Arbeiter Unterstuetzungs Orden

    9

    Chicago Arbeiterverein

    German Employees of Union Hide and Leather Company

    German Workmen's Union

    Route

    South on Wabash Avenue to Van Buren Street, west to Desplaines Street, north to Lake Street, east to Wells Street, north to Ohio Street, east to Clark Street, south to Lake Street, east to Wabash Avenue, south to Madison Street, west to Farwell Hall.

    Any other lodges or societies desiring to join in the parade are requested to apply to Mr. Peter Hand, 130 North Clark Street.

    All the societies of the North Side will meet at the North Side Turnhalle on North Clark Street, at 8:15 A. M; the Societies of the Northwest Side will meet At Aurora Turnhalle, on Milwaukee Avenue, and the Societies of the South Side 10at the Vorwaerts Turnhalle, on West Twelfth Street; a band will be ready to lead the societies to their respective meeting places.

    The following men will act as assistant marshals: Alderman Buehler, Gustav Neuhaus, H. Schmehl, F. Schweinfurth, Ernst Sonntag, and M. Gottfried.

    Peter Hand, Marshal.

    [Translator's note: The first seven paragraphs of this article are an appeal to the public to co-operate with the German Patriotic Aid Society by attending and purchasing articles at a ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, IV, II D 10, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 01, 1870
    A German National Bank for Chicago (Editorial)

    An act of the last Congress authorizes the Controller of Currency to organize several new national banks and permits the circulation of about a million dollars in paper money in the state of Illinois. The Honorable H. R. Hullburdt, Controller of Currency, deserves the gratitude of Chicago's Germans, because he appropriated one fourth of this million for the establishment of a German national bank in this city, providing, at the same time, that this bank may increase its capital to $1,000,000.

    The Controller of Currency has entrusted the firm of Henry Greenbaum and Company with the task of organizing the German National Bank. The choice is very fortunate. It is hardly necessary to point out that this banking house enjoys an enviable reputation, not only among Chicago businessmen, but also in the commercial circles of the entire country. it is a well-established fact that the 2American public has great confidence in Mr. Greenbaum's institution. And the fact that the list of stockholders of the new institution contains the names of many prominent local Germans is directly attributable to the confidence which the commercial world has in the Greenbaum Bank, and especially in the firm's president, Mr. Henry Greenbaum.

    The following German business houses are among the stockholders of the German National Bank of Chicago: Henry Greenbaum and Company, bankers; Beck and Wirth, wholesale tobaccors; J. and E. Jaeger, glass and porcelain ware; Bergho, Rubling and Company, toys; Theodor Weber, boots and shoes; Peter Schuttler, wagon manufacturer; Leopold and Austrian, commission and cartage; Andrew Schall, real-estate brokers; Hart Brothers, manufacturers; Leopold Kuh and Company; Edmund Juessen, revenue collector; John Hertling, distiller; Joseph Liebenstein, wholesaler; Charles Rietz and Brothers, lumber; Louis Suess, liquors; Simon Floersheim, secretary of Germania Fire Insurance Company; and Adolph Loeb, real estate.

    3

    The native American element was represented by the following prominent men and firms: Marshal Field, of Field, Leiter and Company; Charles F. Grey, leather goods; and David A. Gage, City Treasurer.

    Next Saturday a board of directors will be elected at the German Savings Bank, as may be seen from the announcement that appears in our advertising columns today.

    As soon as the necessary preparations have been made, the German National Bank of Chicago will enter upon its business career. The Greenbaum Bank will serve as a basis for the new institution and will be absorbed by it. Truly that will be a firm foundation for the new bank.

    Through careful management the firm of Greenbaum and Company, especially the trust department has built up a much larger clientele than any other private banks of Chicago can boast of, and this fact, together with the favorable prospects previously alluded to, cannot fail to result in an expansion and a 4rating that will make the German National Bank of Chicago the pride of all local Germans.

    In connection with this matter we cannot help but acknowledge the success of Mr. Greenbaum's past activity. It was but a short time ago that he organized the German Savings Bank, which already enjoys great popularity, and now he is busily engaged in the establishment of another useful German institution. Thus he is erecting a monument that will long bear witness to the fact that, although he is an American citizen in the full sense of the word, he always has a warm heart and an open hand, whenever it is a matter of promoting German interests and German honor.

    An act of the last Congress authorizes the Controller of Currency to organize several new national banks and permits the circulation of about a million dollars in paper money in ...

    German
    II A 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 05, 1870
    German Patriotic Aid Association First list of contributions

    Henry Greenbaum $250.00
    F. Schnell 2.50

    [Translator's note: The above represents the largest and the smallest of seventy-eight contributions which totaled $3,065.30.]

    The above list is a record of all donations which were received until today, September 3, 1870, by H. Greenbaum, Treasurer.

    Fritz Annecke,

    Secretary.

    <table> <tr> <td>Henry Greenbaum</td> <td>$250.00</td> </tr> <tr> <td>F. Schnell</td> <td>2.50</td> </tr> </table> [Translator's note: The above represents the largest and the smallest of seventy-eight contributions which totaled $3,065.30.] The above ...

    German
    III H, IV, II D 10, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 08, 1870
    German Patriotic Aid Association

    A contribution of $2,304.45 was received yesterday from the Musicians' Union. This sum was enclosed in the following letter:

    Chicago, September 3, 1870

    Mr. Henry Greenbaum, Treasurer of German Patriotic Aid Association:

    I have the pleasure of submitting the following report on the picnic which the Musicians Union held August 21, 1870, for the benefit of wounded German soldiers, and the widows and orphans of soldiers who gave their lives for Germany. I submit the report in the name of the Arrangement Committee,

    Respectfully,

    Christian Trautmann.

    2

    Tickets (.25 each) ................................. $2,063.75

    Proceeds from rental of bars........................ $535.00

    Total ................................................. $2,598.75

    Disbursements

    Miscellaneous ......................................... $294.30

    Net proceeds........................................ $2,304.45

    The following contributions were collected by the Reverend Henry Wunder:

    A. Ullrich ............................................... $20.00

    G. Schlender ............................................. 1.00

    [Translator's note: The above amounts represent the largest and the smallest 3donations. Twenty donors are listed. The total amount contributed was $113.50.]

    A contribution of $2,304.45 was received yesterday from the Musicians' Union. This sum was enclosed in the following letter: Chicago, September 3, 1870 Mr. Henry Greenbaum, Treasurer of German Patriotic ...

    German
    II D 10, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 08, 1870
    German Patriotic Ladies' Aid

    In the meeting which the German Patriotic Ladies' Aid held yesterday it was decided to dispose of the articles which were left over from the Fair given in Farwell Hall, at the North Side Turnhall next Thursday. The manner of disposal will be announced tomorrow.

    The following letter was received from Concordia Maennerchor:

    Chicago, September 7, 1870

    To The Executive Board of the local German Patriotic Ladies' Aid:

    The expenditures incidental to our concert at Farwell Hall in behalf of German soldiers and their dependents were met with funds taken from the treasury of our society. We are enclosing a check for $215, the gross receipts, which represents our contribution to the worthy cause.

    Very respectfully,

    Otto Walmsdorff, Secretary.

    2

    The resolution adopted in the meeting held on Friday evening which provided that all contributions received by the German Patriotic Ladies Aid for the support of needy German soldiers and the widows and orphans of German soldiers be sent directly to Berlin by the treasurer of the Executive Board, Mr. Henry Greenbaum, was unanimously adopted.

    Mr. H. Claussenius, treasurer of the Ladies' Aid estimated the total net receipts from the activity of the ladies at about $17,000. That is very gratifying.

    Adjournment followed.

    In the meeting which the German Patriotic Ladies' Aid held yesterday it was decided to dispose of the articles which were left over from the Fair given in Farwell Hall, ...

    German
    II D 10, I G, III H