The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 13, 1867
    Republicans Appoint Ward Committees

    The Republican City Central Committee and the Republican candidates for city offices met yesterday at 11 A. M. in the office of the city clerk. The headquarters of the Republican Campaign Committee has been transferred to 84 Randolph Street.

    The following Republican ward committees were appointed: [Translator's note: In the following list, non-German names are omitted in translation.]

    First Ward: Peter Regitz, Isaac Pflaum, [and five others].

    Second Ward: Philipp Becker, Henry Schroeder, [and three others].

    Third Ward: August Neuhaus, W. W. Schmidt, [and three others].

    Fourth Ward: Otto Bluhm, [and five others].

    Fifth Ward: Michal Schmitz, Christ Eigenmann, Rudolph Kemmler, [and three others].

    Sixth Ward: A. Engelbacher, A. B. Chladeck, William Ruehl, [and three others].

    Seventh Ward: D. Kluetsch, C. Klose, [and three others].

    The Republican City Central Committee and the Republican candidates for city offices met yesterday at 11 A. M. in the office of the city clerk. The headquarters of the Republican ...

    German
    I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 26, 1867
    A. Kraushaar's Clasp Improvement

    Everyone who is familiar with the history of piano manufacturing knows that more than fifty years the European manufacturers introduced the clasp as an improvement upon the generally used bridge. The clasp supports the string just opposite the stroke of the hammer, while the bridge pin supports the string from the side only. Thus the use of the bridge pin made it impossible to obtain the required rigidity and stability for clearness and fullness of musical tone. Only a few local manufacturers have introduced the clasp. One of them claims he applied the device in 1836; another says he attached it to the iron-framed piano, while another claims he used it in connection with the strings of a violin. It cannot be denied that the introduction of the iron frame has greatly improved the modern piano; but the system, now in vogue, of placing the entire weight upon the iron frame by attaching the clasps to the iron frame with screws is advantageous only to a certain extent. It will be readily understood that the iron frame, though it makes for stability, hampers the production of clear musical tones. Only wood can develop and support the 2vibrations of the strings, as experience teaches, and why should we not benefit by what sound reason has taught us for many years? The solution of the problem was to attach the clasps in such a way that contact with iron was avoided. This problem has not been solved.

    Mr. Kraushaar, of Kraushaar and Company, 19 North Huston Street, has done everything that can be done in this respect. He has devised a new system of attaching the clasps, and his system avoids the above mentioned faults. By his system the vibration of the strings is supported and reinforced. All tones are full, clear, and pleasing to the sensitive musical ear, and we do not doubt that the benefits of the excellent instrument which Kraushaar and Company have made during the time they have been in business in Chicago will gain for them a host of new admirers and satisfied customers.

    Everyone who is familiar with the history of piano manufacturing knows that more than fifty years the European manufacturers introduced the clasp as an improvement upon the generally used bridge. ...

    German
    II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 07, 1867
    The Chicago Arbeiterverein and the Illinois Staats-Zeitung (Editorial)

    The Chicago Arbeiterverein which was controlled for some time by several political intriguers who proved their claim to the title "worker" by nor working, and which was used to carry on a purposeless war against the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, seems to have freed itself from the pernicious influences of those scoundrels. One of them, who gave his occupation as that of a "luncher," and whose financial records are being investigated by a United States Assessor, has been expelled by the organization, and several others are avoiding a similar fate by keeping discreetly in the background. The real workers represented in the Arbeiterverein have declared their independence of those political schemers who used the society to their own advantage and thwarted all endeavors in behalf of the real workers. The latter group sent us the following letter:

    2

    Chicago, Illinois, June 4, 1867.

    To the Honorable Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung,

    Dear Mr. Brentano: In the absence of our corresponding secretary I take great pleasure in informing you that the Chicago Arbeiterverein in its last meeting adopted the following resolution proposed by Mr. Sievers:

    1. That the resolution to withdraw our advertisements from the Illinois Staats-Zeitung and to remove the copies of that publication from our reading room is hereby revoked.

    2. That it is hereby resolved that the Chicago Arbeiterverein renew its subscription for the Illinois Staats-Zeitung and publish the news of the society in that newspaper.

    In conclusion I express my fervent wish that our future relations will be 3strengthened by mutual consideration.

    Very respectfully,

    C. Schaedel, Secretary protem.

    It is evident that all obstacles to future publication of the activities of the Chicago Arbeiterverein have been removed by the revocation of the above-mentioned resolution, for which there was not the least cause; and we are in hearty accord with the desire expressed by the secretary of the organization in the closing sentence of his letter.

    The Chicago Arbeiterverein which was controlled for some time by several political intriguers who proved their claim to the title "worker" by nor working, and which was used to carry ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 10, 1867
    Our Financial Legislators

    "Every evil [has] its good," says an old proverb. The truth of the adage is again evident with respect to the heavy debt which we incurred through the great War of the Rebellion. Of course, now that the first great joy caused by our glorious victory has passed, and the immense increase in business brought about by post-war demands has given place to a strong reaction, and taxes are becoming burdensome, hardly anybody will join in the old reckless cry of sanguine Americans--that our debts are a benefit, even though the benefit is disguised. Yet no one will deny that our debt has some good, some "redeeming" features. Necessity teaches us to pray; but necessity also teaches us that we must work. The bitter but salutary lesson of necessity was required to persuade the proud South, which had sunk into idleness, to be more energetic, and to recognize its appalling lack of knowledge and industrial ambition. And the results will be very beneficial for the South. Similarly, a great and perpetually active force like the tax burden which was placed upon the people was needed to put an end 2to the whole Union's thoughtless squandering of public property and neglect of the vast resources which are at our disposal. Of course, the evil of squandering public property is too deeply rooted in all our legislative and administrative branches to be removed immediately. Politicians of all classes and parties, public officials, and the people themselves, are so accustomed to having ample means and regarding the wealth and the resources of the United States as inexhaustible, that much time will elapse and many bitter experiences will have to be borne, before our legislators and administrators will be guided and governed by strict rules of economy. However, the time will come when we will be forced to examine our resources, and then at least an attempt will be made to use them in the interest of the public. Also, and what is more important, the people will finally understand that only those men are fit to serve them as legislators who, besides being honest and loyal, also have a thorough knowledge of and experience in the administration of finances and political economy.

    The experiences of the United States financial administrators during the past 3few years cannot fail to serve as a lesson to the people of the United States and to our legislators in Congress. It is true that Americans pay little attention to the opinions of Europeans, unless the latter flatter their national vanity. However, though Americans continue to pay ever so dearly for their indifference toward the good advice which comes from abroad now and then, the day will finally come when they will begin to heed that advice.

    If the gentlemen who make our laws would ask themselves why American bonds that pay six per cent interest are sold in London at seventy-two, while English bonds that pay three per cent interest are sold there at ninety, and the same American bonds are sold in Paris at seventy-eight, while an issue of French bonds paying three and one-half per cent are sold at sixty-eight, they would find that the credit of the United States, that is, faith in their ability and willingness to pay their debts, is much lower than the credit of England, and that even France, which is ever threatened by a terrible social revolution, has a better credit standing than the great, wealthy, powerful, Union. And yet, all Europe acknowledges not only the great riches of the United States and the stability and solidity 4which the Republic attained and displayed during the recent war, but also the American people's honesty and willingness to sacrifice. An article entitled "The National Debt of America" which appeared May 25, in the London Times makes the following assertion:

    "In the face of urgent necessity, the American Congress did not hesitate to levy heavy taxes, and the American people submitted to them with a willingness that surprised even America's own statesmen. For several years America has been the most highly taxed nation of the world. Not even the English or Dutch are so constantly and variously taxed as the citizens of this Republic."

    However, the London Times also calls attention to the truly foolish extravagance of American legislatures, not only of Congress, but also of the state legislatures. Wherever the burden of taxes has been increased by maladministration, or, if the rumor be true, by something worse, as is the case in New York and other large cities, the burden thus imposed upon individuals must be very great indeed. And now we are told that despite all sacrifices the debt of the United States is not 5decreasing. The Times finds a cause for this situation in extravagance and financial maladministration. It makes a comparison between the American Congress and the English Parliament.

    "The former," it says, "consists of people who hail from all parts of the country, neither know one another nor have any experience in political economy, and therefore are not fit persons to administer the finances of the country, while Parliament has always been 'the watchdog' of the National Treasury of England and a close observer of the actions of English ministers."

    These are bitter truths, yet nobody can refute them. Of course, it can at least be said to the credit of the American people that the political character of their representatives, and the stand of the latter on the burning issues of the day, on the Rebellion and subsequent reconstruction, heretofore so engrossed the attention of the electorate, that a discussion of the financial ability and experience of political candidates was very limited, and, in most cases, entirely ignored. In 6addition, it must be said that in previous periods of legislation political and financial issues were not nearly as important as those which are now before Congress, and that the American people are not yet accustomed to demanding from their public officials a knowledge of public finances.

    But necessity will prove to be an excellent teacher for the American nation and for its lawmakers. The people will make different demands upon their representatives, and the latter will be obliged to pay more attention to the will of the people. The people will live up to the reputation of being eminently practical. They will surely be able to elect men who are the equal of the members of England's Parliament, as far as knowledge of financial matters is concerned--men who have the interest of the entire nation at heart, which cannot be said of the English "money barons" who are supposed to guide the "good ship Albion".

    After the great work of political reconstruction has been accomplished, our nation will devote itself to financial, industrial, and economical reconstruction, and then we shall be recipients of one of the greatest benefits that can 7be bestowed upon a nation, and which we will not esteem and appreciate less, because it will be one of the good results of the Rebellion and of our great national debt.

    "Every evil [has] its good," says an old proverb. The truth of the adage is again evident with respect to the heavy debt which we incurred through the great War ...

    German
    I F 6, I G, I J
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 04, 1867
    Board of Education [Holds Meeting]

    The regular meeting of the Board was held on Tuesday evening. The following members were present: Avery, Ballantyne, Bond, Bonfield, Brentano, Briggs, Clark, Dreier, Foster, Guilford, Leavitt, Runyan; Ryder, and Tinkham. we shall confine our report to the minutes on instruction in the German language.

    Inspector Dreier reported that in 1865 the German language was introduced into the regular curriculum of the Washington School. The results were so gratifying that the Board decided on July 12, 1866 to make instruction in German a part of the curriculums in the wells, Franklin, Moseley, and Newberry schools. One hundred and forty of the high school students took the German course, and of these only fifteen were of German parentage. Many of the pupils of the upper class do reading, spelling, writing, and translating, and most of them are making good progress. Those who lose interest after having received instruction for a specified time are 2transferred to the regular course.

    In the Moseley School, which is attended exclusively by children of American parentage, a hundred and thirty pupils are studying German under Miss McClintock. In the Franklin School, a hundred and fifty pupils are instructed in German by Miss Achort. In the Wells School, Miss Guenther teaches German to a hundred and fifty children. In the Newberry School, Miss Bockme has a hundred and fifty "German" pupils.

    The Board decided that instructors in German are to attend the teachers' institutes and shall constitute a special section under the supervision of the high school teachers. The report was adopted.

    The regular meeting of the Board was held on Tuesday evening. The following members were present: Avery, Ballantyne, Bond, Bonfield, Brentano, Briggs, Clark, Dreier, Foster, Guilford, Leavitt, Runyan; Ryder, and ...

    German
    I A 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 11, 1867
    Report of the Society for the Aid of German Immigrants April 1 to July 5, 1867

    Receipts

    Cash on hand, April 1, 1867 $317.78
    Dues received during quarter 601.90
    Loans repaid 30.00
    Rent received 11.50
    Total $961.18

    Disbursements

    Aid to immigrants $285.95
    Agent's salary for quarter 180.00
    2
    Rent for quarter $76.00
    Office supplies, postage, etc 27.65
    Advertising and printing 50.70
    Solicitor's salary 62.40
    Total $655.70 (sic)
    Balance July 5, 1867 305.48

    There are 347 contributing members, and 102 noncontributing. The Society also loaned $150 to an immigrant. This money is fully secured.

    C. Knobelsdorff, secretary.

    Receipts <table> <tr> <td>Cash on hand, April 1, 1867</td> <td>$317.78</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Dues received during quarter</td> <td>601.90</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Loans repaid</td> <td>30.00</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Rent received</td> <td>11.50</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Total</td> ...

    German
    II D 10, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 11, 1867
    C. Schweizer and Company The Largest Business of its Kind in Chicago Founded in 1847

    Last Tuesday the toy, novelty, and fancy goods business of J. D. Weber, 184 Lake Street, was sold to C. Schweizer and Company. For years, this great enterprise has been favorably known to the public of Chicago and also to the farm population of Cook and Du Page counties, since the firm always has carried a large and varied stock of goods, has given its customers ideal service, and has sold its goods at very reasonable prices.

    The new owners have known the business for many years. Mr. Schweizer is an old employe of Weber's and has had extensive experience under other proprietors of similar stores; he is thus well qualified to carry on the business.

    The new proprietors will continue both branches, the wholesale as well as the retail, and one of the partners will soon make a trip to Europe to purchase the 2most modern goods available on the market there.

    The firm is located at 184 Lake Street in a three-story building, where it displays a greater variety of merchandise than any other Chicago store dealing in the same line of merchandise.

    Last Tuesday the toy, novelty, and fancy goods business of J. D. Weber, 184 Lake Street, was sold to C. Schweizer and Company. For years, this great enterprise has been ...

    German
    II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 13, 1867
    Meeting of German Women

    Yesterday afternoon, a large number of German women met in Uhlich's Concert Hall for the purpose of electing an arrangements committee to support effectively the People's Fair to be held for the benefit of the Society for the Aid of German Immigrants. The assembly elected Mrs. Betty Faber chairman, and Miss Amalie Herzberger secretary. After H. Claussenius, C. Knobelsdorff, and Doctor Bessel had explained the purpose of the meeting to the ladies, and had requested that they assist in making the Fair a success, it was decided to participate in this worthy benevolent cause and to elect a committee of twelve to make the necessary arrangements. The following were chosen to serve on the committee: Mrs. John Metz, chairman; Miss Amalie Herzberger, vice-chairman; Mrs. Lena Emmett, secretary; [and nine others, whose names are omitted in translation].

    Thereupon twenty-seven subscription books were distributed, and the meeting was adjourned. Women who wish to obtain subscription books will please 2apply to

    Amalie Herzberger,

    Secretary.

    Yesterday afternoon, a large number of German women met in Uhlich's Concert Hall for the purpose of electing an arrangements committee to support effectively the People's Fair to be held ...

    German
    II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 03, 1867
    Anent the Sunday Question (Editorial)

    In a recent editorial entitled "Reasonable Opinions" we said that our English- speaking citizens are becoming more enlightened and more liberal in their views on religious matters. The local Post (issue of August 1) is a pertinent example. Christian Times and Witness, a local religious periodical, published a fulminating article, sustaining the statement made by Dr. Schaff and his henchmen in the meeting held at Crosby Opera House, "that a widespread and well organized conspiracy exists for the purpose of desecrating the Sabbath, breaking down public morals, fostering crime and vice, and undermining the very principles which all Americans esteem very highly", denouncing the Germans as the chief tools of this conspiracy, and accusing the liberal press of setting the value of the German vote above that of religion and morality. In answer to this article the Post writes, August 1:

    2

    "It is not difficult to enact a good law and to place it on the statute book, but it is impossible to enforce a law that is not in agreement with the opinions and desires of the majority of the people of a community.

    "Who is to blame if honest German workers prefer spending a part of the Sabbath in a beer garden to visiting the stylish temple of the Reverend 'Creamcheese,' there to endure the suspicious glances of elegantly attired 'Christians,' or attending services in the house of worship presided over by Reverend 'Zealot' where thunderous anathemas are cast upon him from the Old and New Testaments?"

    If modern Christianity has nothing to attract the great class of citizens, the workers, to its houses of worship on Sunday, why should Christians be surprised to find that workers look elsewhere for recuperations from the effects of daily toil?

    To accuse all who do not go to church on Sunday, and who drink beer on the Lord's Day, of "intending to undermine the civil and religious institutions of our 3country," is foolish and unjust.

    It has never occurred to these peace-loving and law-abiding citizens to encroach upon the religious freedom of others, nor do they have the least thought of conspiring against liberty, when they drink beer on Sunday; and though they were in the wrong, they certainly cannot be persuaded to do right by the ridicule and lies which are hurled at them by some so-called ministers.

    We often thank God that time of religious persecutions has passed; but we forget, at the same time, that in some of our churches today there prevails an attitude of intolerance which would condemn to death at the stake a man who commits the awful crime of drinking a glass of beer on Sunday, and would execute all "evil-doers," were it not for the fact that such drastic measures are forbidden by law.

    In a recent editorial entitled "Reasonable Opinions" we said that our English- speaking citizens are becoming more enlightened and more liberal in their views on religious matters. The local Post ...

    German
    I B 2, I B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 03, 1867
    Immigration and the Poll Tax (Editorial)

    Four years ago, Congress recognized the principle that immigration is a national problem, and not a problem for the individual states, by setting up an immigration commission; and every sensible person agrees with this view. In nine cases out of ten, Irish or Germans do not come to America with the intention of selecting a certain one of the thirty-six states for their future home, but rather with the purpose of settling in any part of the Republic where they will find opportunity to work or where friendly neighbors attract them. And although after a stay of some duration, they adopt certain customs and work for the causes in which their community is interested, they never develop a sense of individuality which is as intense as that prevailing in European communities. They do not become specifically New Yorkers, or Pennsylvanians, or Kentuckians, but rather German-speaking Americans. The whole country benefits from their immigration. How often 2do we not hear American economists say that each immigrant represents a contribution between $1,000 and $1,500 to our national wealth!

    However, although this truth is simple and clear, yet a practice which is directly at variance with it has taken root in respect to the care of immigrants. Immigration, which concerns the whole nation, is rightly considered to be a specific matter of those states in which the landing ports are located; or, since four fifths of all immigrants disembark at New York, immigration is specifically an affair of that State. And New York levies a poll tax of $2.50 upon each immigrant--and has no more right to do so than it has to place a customs tax on imported goods.

    It is true that the authorities of the State of New York try to justify the tax by claiming that it is a kind of premium for insurance. Every immigrant, they say, purchases with this small sum a claim to assistance in case he becomes a public charge during the period when he is not a citizen, that is, 3during the first five years of his residence in America. The principle itself is good, but it is not applied. The State of New York levies a poll tax upon every immigrant who lands in New York, or a total between $400,000 and $500,000 every year. The sum thus realized is to serve as an insurance fund for some 200,000 immigrants; but only a fraction of that number (one fifth, or one fourth at the most) stays in New York. The result is that those immigrants who settle in other states and become indigent through misfortune are deprived of the benefits which they purchased by paying the poll tax, and, since they have no legal claim to public assistance, they are dependent upon the meager aid which private charitable organizations render. During the past few years, we have come across several cases of this swindle (to call a spade a spade) practiced by the immigration authorities of New York.

    No wonder that the Commission has so much money in its treasury; no wonder it could erect several magnificent buildings on Ward's Island during the past fifteen years and still maintain a reserve fund of more than half a 4million dollars. And now we understand, too, why the Commission is so eager to rush immigrants out of the State while they still have enough money to pay for passage (including the enormous commission of the pashas of Castle Gardens) to some Western State, for the poll tax paid by all immigrants who leave the State of New York is "net profit" for the Commission.

    It is in the interest of all Western States, and especially of large cities which are railroad centers, to see to it that Congress brings about a change in this situation, that the poll tax system is thoroughly reformed, and that this be done on a national basis.

    The solution of the problem is very simple. The poll tax is either a customs tax, and in that case no individual State ever had authority to levy or collect it; or it is an insurance premium, and any State has a just claim to a part of the fund amassed through collection of poll taxes, a part which is in proportion to the number of immigrants who settle in that State.

    5

    As soon as Congress is again in session, local groups will propose a bill restricting the levying and collection of a poll tax to the Federal Bureau of Immigration and providing that the fund collected by that agency be distributed to each State in proportion to the number of immigrants who remain therein. Common sense, and a sense of justice toward all, dictate such a measure, no matter how loudly and vigorously the New York authorities protest against it and cite the present arrangement as a precedent.

    The poll-tax rate could well be increased without being burdensome or unjust. It is much better, and more honest, to charge the immigrant five dollars for a real value, that is, insurance against need resulting from no fault of his own, than to take two dollars from him and give him nothing but unkept promises in return. An insurance company which knows beforehand that it cannot meet the just claims of three fourths of its insured can lower its premium rate more easily than a company which proposes to cover the losses of all its customers. However, that is a point of only minor importance. The premium rate of honest insurance will always have to be computed on the 6basis of an exact statistical theory of probabilities. The main thing is that immigrant insurance or poll taxes should be taken from the jurisdiction and control of the individual States and placed under the supervision and administration of the Federal Government.

    Four years ago, Congress recognized the principle that immigration is a national problem, and not a problem for the individual states, by setting up an immigration commission; and every sensible ...

    German
    III G