The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 08, 1867
    A.Sink's Academic Institute

    "I take great pleasure in publicly thanking the parents and students of the evening classes for their oral and written expressions of appreciation of the excellency of my school.

    "At the same time I wish to state that in an effort to render myself worthy of your esteem I shall continue to apply all diligence and faithfulness to my duties as an educator.

    "Respectfully,

    "A. Sink."

    We believe that we would be doing an able and conscientious, but very modest educator a grave injustice, if we published the above announcement without adding some remarks of our own, especially if we neglected to state that Mr. Sink is a well qualified and successful teacher, and that he has at heart the 2welfare of the children entrusted to his care. We are not recommending him blindly, for our testimony is based upon long observation and experience. We have attended the examinations of his classes and were astonished at the results. In his special classes, penmanship and mathematics, his children have made rapid strides, and we unhesitatingly advise all persons seeking an advanced course in commercial subjects to enroll in his school.

    "I take great pleasure in publicly thanking the parents and students of the evening classes for their oral and written expressions of appreciation of the excellency of my school. "At ...

    German
    II B 2 f, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 08, 1867
    Report of Secretary of Aid Society for German Immigrants

    October 1, 1866 to January 1, 1867.

    Balance on hand $386.00
    Dues for quarter 418.73
    Rent for quarter 22.50
    Total $827.23

    Disbursements.

    Charitable purposes $239.45
    Printing 4.50
    Agent's salary 180.00
    Rent 60.00
    Miscellaneous 57.50
    Total $541.45
    Balance in treasury $285.78
    2

    The Society has loaned $229 to immigrant families. This amount is secured by promissory notes.

    C. Knobelsdorff,

    Secretary.

    October 1, 1866 to January 1, 1867. <table> <tr> <td>Balance on hand</td> <td>$386.00</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Dues for quarter</td> <td>418.73</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Rent for quarter</td> <td>22.50</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Total</td> <td>$827.23</td> </tr> ...

    German
    II D 10, III G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 22, 1867
    The Moegling Society

    Yesterday the treasurer received the following contributions: Chicago Turngemeinde, $100; [names of smaller contributors, fifty-one in number, omitted in translation]; total, $323.75. Previously acknowledged, $512; grand total $835.75. Collectors are requested to report to our office every afternoon before five o'clock. [Translator's note: This money was being collected for the relief of the sick and destitute German patriot, Theodor Moegling.]

    Yesterday the treasurer received the following contributions: Chicago Turngemeinde, $100; [names of smaller contributors, fifty-one in number, omitted in translation]; total, $323.75. Previously acknowledged, $512; grand total $835.75. Collectors are ...

    German
    II D 10, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 28, 1867
    The Moegling Society

    Friederich Hecker, an old friend and war comrade of Theodor Moegling, writes:

    "In Germany people always have money for various kinds of amusements and sports, but it has long been a custom there to let patriots starve.

    "Moegling, who resigned from a lucrative office for the sake of the people, and who fought for liberty not only in parliament but also on the battlefield, where he courageously led his band against the enemy, was wounded severely and crippled permanently. He has a just claim to immediate help from all patriots. And even if the Germans in Germany have nothing but pleasant words to offer him, Americans of German descent will set a good example for their former countrymen. We Americans of German parentage will give no one just cause to say that we permitted German patriots to succumb to misery and need."

    In this connection, we wish to inform our readers that the noble example set 2by the Chicago Turngemeinde has not been in vain. The St. Louis Turngemeinde has taken the necessary steps to join in helping Moegling, and in Cincinnati, at a meeting of Germans under the chairmanship of Gereral Wilich, it was voted to render the "German patriot in Germany" all possible aid.

    In Chicago, $1501.25 has been contributed to date; and although Chicago leads all other cities in the United States, there are quite a few local Germans who have been blessed with this world's goods in no small measure but who have not yet opened their hearts and their pocketbooks to lend a hand in this worthy cause. We hope they will respond to our appeal very shortly.

    Friederich Hecker, an old friend and war comrade of Theodor Moegling, writes: "In Germany people always have money for various kinds of amusements and sports, but it has long been ...

    German
    II D 10, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 26, 1867
    The Temperance Movement and German Immigration (Editorial)

    Emigration from Germany will reach new heights this year. The New York Herald estimates, on basis of reports received from its correspondents at Berlin and Munich, that at least 150,000 persons will leave Germany and come to America during the period from March to December, 1867. When we consider that conditions in Germany are unstable, that another war will be waged as soon as the necessary preparations have been completed, and that compulsory military service will cause every able bodied man who is not kept at home by uncontrollable circumstances to seek a new and quiet home in the Western Hemisphere, where the principles of liberty, justice and equality have been firmly and permanently established, the estimate of the New York Herald does not seem too high in the least. And this greater immigration quota not only increases our national wealth by adding substantially to our man power, but also greatly augments our supply of gold and silver, since the people who are persuaded to leave their mother country because of reasons previously 2mentioned usually belong to the class of property owners.

    Therefore, the American people should give these immigrants every possible consideration. The Germans who come to the United States seek more than material gain; they are bent on attaining freedom of action, freedom of thought, and freedom of conscience. While they are seeking economic independence, they wish to have freedom of movement, and especially they want to be unhampered in their enjoyment of harmless pleasures. The German nation is a thinking nation, an enlightened nation, and it cannot be convinced that nature and the gifts of nature have not been created for the satisfaction and pleasure of human beings. Although they were oppressed in the old country, they were never prevented from pursuing innocent pleasures, either at home or in company, and nobody ever dictated to them regarding what they should or should not eat or drink.

    Germans are sober people. Their national drinks are of a light and harmless nature. Drunkards are an exception to the rule. Thus a German immigrant 3would be surprised to find that efforts are being made in this country, where he sought freedom, to prohibit the use of beer, wine, and even distilled liquor.

    And yet, just at this time, when many immigrants are expected, bigotry, hypocrisy, and rumors of temperance are rife. Nobody will object to the organization of temperance societies, and nobody will attempt to prevent the members of those societies from promising to abstain from beer, wine, hard cider, and whisky. Anyone is privileged to establish or join such a society, just as everyone has the right to drink water. Indeed, we advise everybody who cannot use the gifts of nature in a moderate and humane way, and who, like a wild animals, must continue to drink after taking the first few sips, to Join one of the many temperance societies immediately, to vow complete abstinence from alcoholic liquors, and thus to save whatever human dignity he may still possess. Nor do we object when these advocates of moderateness proselytize through lectures, pamphlets, and books, in their endeavor to reform drunkards. As long as they do one more than try to convince people, 4they are within their constitutional rights; but as soon as they attempt to control the legislative body of the state, and to create moderation through punitive laws, they exceed their rights.

    This opinion seems to be gaining adherents. 'Tis true, the legislatures of some states, for instance, New York, Pennsylvania, a few of the New England States, either one or the other Western States (Iowa or Kansas) are still laboring under the delusion of ignorance and are trying to reform drunkards by legislation; however, the Anglo-American press is beginning to take a decisive stand against the fanaticism and bigotry of temperance agitators. The New York Herald says in an article on German immigration:

    "We do not intend to permit anyone to interfere with the harmless amusements and entertainments to which the Germans are accustomed, and which were not prohibited even by the oppressors in their native country. We are very determined in this matter, since there is a marked tendency in the legislatures of some states towards pharisaism which would work a severe hardship on 5our German fellow citizens. When we consider their sobriety and their diligence, their preference for outdoor amusements, and the beneficial effect of their example upon other nationalities, we must protest against any restriction which would cause them to dislike our institutions and urge them to remain away from our shores."

    This last argument, pointing as it does to the danger of material loss emanating from fanaticism, is very well taken. When the bigots and adherents of temperance in Iowa, Kansas, and other states which depend upon immigration for their development, find that Germans avoid them and settle elsewhere, they will soon have a change of heart. Here in Illinois temperance is an antiquated idea, and in Chicago, especially, there is as much freedom in regard to the consumption of liquor as there is anywhere in Germany. The German element has gained so much political influence in the Prairie State, and the Anglo-American press of that city is so strongly opposed to temperance fanatics, that nobody would think of trying to increase the virtue of moderateness through prohibition or punitive laws. In an article published 6in last Sunday's issue of the Chicago Tribune, and reprinted on Monday, that newspaper proves how foolish and unenforceable all temperance laws are. Of course, the Tribune, too, is ready to do everything it can to promote sobriety and prevent crimes that are caused by intemperance.

    "But" says the Tribune, "when the law essays to regulate the private life of people, and trys to dictate what they shall, or shall not, eat or drink, to what church a citizen must go, and how often he must attend services, etc., then the law becomes tyrannical, violates the feelings of everybody, and engenders an opposition which is directed not only against liquor dealers."

    The Tribune concludes the article thus: "Such a law was proposed in our state legislature as long as twelve years ago, before the experiment was made in other places; and it failed then. Any attempt to revive it, after it has been condemned by the experience of twenty years, would be just as practical as it would to warm up the old theory of the Know-nothings, to introduce the old blue laws in the state of Connecticut, or to place the 7old law against witchcraft once more upon the statutes of Massachusetts."

    The Chicago Times, once a Copperhead paper, but now an organ of progressive Democrats, expresses a similar opinion, and is surprised that any appreciable number of intelligent people who claim the ability to rule themselves--and that includes the ability to think for themselves--could possibly revive the "old humbug that was advocated and tried by the Massachusetts School".

    Emigration from Germany will reach new heights this year. The New York Herald estimates, on basis of reports received from its correspondents at Berlin and Munich, that at least 150,000 ...

    German
    I B 2, III G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 05, 1867
    The Moegling Society

    Yesterday, a package containing $2,500 in United States Government bonds was sent via United States Express to New York, from where it will be forwarded to its destination. Mr. Colvin, Superintendent of the United States Express Company, made no charge for the services of his organization. The package contains the following letter:

    "Mrs. Louise Moegling,

    "Heilbronn,

    "Kingdom of Wuerttemberg, Germany.

    "Dear Madam: Through an appeal published in a New York literary magazine by Doctor Heinrich Tiedemann, of Philadelphia, we received the sad news that your husband, Theodor Moegling, the German patriot and champion of liberty, who was wounded in the battle of Waghaeusel and suffered for his people for ten years in the prison at Bruchsal, is now a patient in an asylum for the 2insane as a result of brutal treatment at the hands of prison officers. We also learned that you have not the means to pay the cost of adequate medical treatment for your beloved husband, and that you and your small son are actually in need of the necessaries of life. Your cry for help has been heard here, and the Germans in the republic of North America have been deeply stirred, especially the Germans in the city of Chicago.

    "If Germany lets her patriots and her tested men starve, while her imperial generals are showered with wealth, then the free German citizens of this Union will have to pay the debt of gratitude to unfortunate and deserted patriots. As soon as we Chicago Germans were informed of the sad plight of Theodor Moegling, we established a Moegling Society, and since Doctor Tiedemann requested that immediate help be rendered, we sent $500 to you three days after we read the Doctor's appeal. In the meantime, we collected $2,500 and invested it in United States Government bonds. It was our intention to provide a safe investment from which you may draw a small but sure income, after having cared for your immediate needs. The first interest payment on 3the bonds is due May 1, and will amount to $75, or 1871/2 gulden, which you may collect by presenting the coupons to your bank. We hope and wish that this small investment will be increased to such an extent by contributions from Germans in other cities of the United States that you will be protected against want, and that you will no longer be harassed by worry while caring for the education of your son and attending to the recovery of your husband.

    "Should Theodor Moegling be blessed with a lucid moment when you are present, please tell him that there are men on the other side of the ocean who have not forgotten him and who will not permit tried and true patriots, or the members of their families, to suffer want.

    "Please accept our sincere sympathy in the severe trials and misfortunes that have beset you and your worthy husband.

    "Very respectfully yours,

    4

    "The Committee of the Moegling Society,

    "Lorenz Brentano, chairman,

    "Heinrich Greenbaum, secretary,

    "Julius Standau, treasurer."

    When an acknowledgement of this gift is received, we shall publish it.

    Yesterday, a package containing $2,500 in United States Government bonds was sent via United States Express to New York, from where it will be forwarded to its destination. Mr. Colvin, ...

    German
    II D 10, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 08, 1867
    The South Side Park (Editorial)

    Although the act creating a South Side park may be very severely criticized by some people, it cannot be denied that the provisions of the act in general are for the most part just and essentially in conformity with the laws by which Now York's Central Park was established. The question is not whether a better law could have been enacted, but whether this law, of it is ratified by the people, is sufficient legal authority to fulfill the desire of the people for a public park which is in walking distance from the streetcar, and which will be conducive to the health and recreation of our citizens.

    Nobody who knows the South Side of Chicago can deny that the park must be located the limits prescribed by the law, because only there can the necessary land be purchased at a reasonable price.

    2

    At a cost of one hundred to five hundred dollars per acre the land cannot cost more than five hundred thousand dollars, and even three hundred fifty thousand dollars should be enough to buy a suitable site. The law does not demand that extensive improvements be made immediately, nor is this expected. It will be two years or even longer before the land is surveyed and the park laid out; and before much money will have been spent for that purpose, the adjacent lots will have increased greatly in value.

    The act provides that the cost of the property used for the park shall be paid by taxing the owners of the property which increases in value through the establishment of the park; and in order that the payments will not be too burdensome, the assessments are spread over ten years.

    There is every reason to believe that the increase in assessed valuation and the resulting rise in taxes, caused by the establishment of the park, will exceed the cost of the park and the interest on the bonds which may be sold, 3according to the act. To explain this, we quote from an article that was published in a recent issue of the New York Evening Post:

    "The assessed valuation of the three wards adjoining Central Park was $26,429,565 in 1856 and rose to $61,029,960 in 1865. Thus where was an increase of $34,600,395 within ten years in these three wards alone. However, the annual interest on the cost of the land, and the annual cost for the improvements made in Central Park was $585,953,76. Thus we see that the city's income was $448,718.05 above disbursements. There need be no further proof of the fact that a park is a profitable investment for a large city."

    If the city of New York, after ten years, increased its income in a single year by $448,718.05, there can be no doubt that a similar investment would be profitable for South Chicago and the towns of Lake Park and Hyde Park.

    The objection has been raised that it would be unjust to tax only the South 4Side of Chicago to pay for the park, since the entire city is paying for the parks located on the North Side and the West Side. Be that as it may, there cannot be the least doubt that as long as the North Side and West Side have a majority in the City Council the public lands on the South Side will not be improved at the cost of the city. This is the case, despite the fact that much money has already been spent to purchase and improve Union Park and Lincoln Park, despite the fact that the land used for these parks was adjacent to the most highly taxed property is and despite the fact that the assessed valuation of south Side property is $42,000,000, and the property of the North and west Side $58,000,000.

    It is believed that the financial advantages according to South Chicago, Hyde Park, and lake Park will be equal to the cost of the park, before the time allotted for paying for the park has elapsed.

    Chicago simply must have a large park if it is to become a large city. There 5is nothing attractive in the vicinity of Chicago, save Lake Michigan.

    Chicago's commercial advantages are great, indeed. Money is easily earned here, but it will not remain here, unless the city is made attractive.

    How many people who have acquired wealth in Chicago have gone abroad, or to other cities to spend their money, thus depriving us of riches which rightfully belonged to us? What is their answer, when they are asked: "Why are you leaving Chicago?" Is it not: "There is nothing here that attracts us; there are no parks, no parks, no promenades; this is a good place to make money, but that is all"?

    So if we wish to keep our wealthy people here and persuade them to spend their money here, we will have to offer then some better inducement, something that will attach them to our city. If we do not, more money will leave Chicago than a hundred parks cost. However, we must also consider those thousands of residents who are not rich. we must have public parks and gardens where both 6rich and poor, old and young, any enjoy fresh air, pleasant strolls, beautiful scenery and flowers, and be attracted by these pleasures to such an extent that they will have no time for less profitable activity.

    Those persons who regarded the Dearborn School as too large for our city and advised that an asylum for the insane advocates of that building be crected on the site of the School will also oppose the establishment of the park. Those persons who think that the Canal and railroads are disadvantageous to Chicago's commerce, and that plank roads are better than asphalt pavements, will also be against the South side park.

    In fact anyone who is so narrow-minded, or parsimonious, that he cannot see a single benefit in any public improvement, will certainly not wish the city Council to arrange the purchase of a park on the South Side.

    Therefore, let all of us who deem it our duty to care for the health and 7recreation of thousands, all who believe that Chicago must be made attractive for the purpose of laying a foundation of wealth, all who wish to enjoy the simple pleasures and amusements which every other city affords, let us vote for the park, and the law will be ratified, and Chicago will be just as famous for its public parks and the comfort and pleasure which people enjoy in them, as it is for its commerce and industry and the wealth and well being they make possible.

    Although the act creating a South Side park may be very severely criticized by some people, it cannot be denied that the provisions of the act in general are for ...

    German
    I F 3, I M
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 09, 1867
    Yesterday's Primary Election

    Following is the result of the Republican primary election which was held yesterday:

    First Ward: Jacob Beiersdorf, George W. Fritz, Peter Regitz, Nimrod Walz, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] Joshua Knickerbackcer, Alderman; George Hartmann, Constable.

    Second Ward: August Neuhaus, Christian Schell, Johann Schroeder, Karl H. Ham, Delegates; [Translator's note: Eleven other names are omitted.] Arthur Dixon, Alderman; Charles McLane, Constable.

    Third Ward: Joseph Pollock, Karl Rose, Philipp Becker, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] Karl Wicker, Alderman; Sayville Scott, 2Constable.

    Fourth Ward: Conrad Seipp, C. Wahl, Delegates; [Translator's note: Nine other names are omitted.] Sam McCoy, Alderman; W. C. Hendricks, Constable.

    Fifth Ward: William Hausen, Paskal Schneider, Christ Eigenmann, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted. John Raber, Alderman; Peter Murphy, Constable.

    Sixth Ward: William Blanke, William Ruehl, Fred Haertig, Delegates; [Translator's note: Three other names are omitted.] Friedrich Burkhardt, Alderman; A. B. Chladeck, Constable.

    Seventh Ward: Albert Kubeck, Christ Techtmeyer, John Schenk, Delegates; [Translator's note: Six other names are omitted.] John McAllister, Alderman; William Zschokke, Constable.

    3

    Eighth Ward: Fred Maas, N. Schneider, Jacob Link, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.] Isaac Wentworth, Alderman; Fred Haucke, Constable.

    Ninth Ward: William Schade, Delegate; [Translator's note: Fourteen other names are omitted.] W. R. Carpenter, Alderman; Cyrus Keeler, Constable.

    Tenth Ward: Andrew Wemple, Otto Dehling, U. Lochbieler, Delegates; [Translator's note: Nine other names are omitted.] Edmund Bixby, Alderman; Joel Lull, Constable.

    Eleventh Ward: Henry Ackhoff, Edward S. Salomon, Charles Muenzer, H. Gade, Delegates; [Translator's note: Seven other names are omitted.] S. J. Russel, Alderman; G. Stirling, Constable.

    Twelfth Ward: August Steinhaus, Fred Yoltz, Henry Schroeder, Clement Hirsch, Louis Schultze, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.]

    4

    O. W. Potter, Alderman; Fred Zschokke, Constable.

    Thirteenth Ward: Conrad Yoltz, Gustave Fischer, K. G. Schmidt, Delegates; [Translator's note: Three other names are omitted.] George T. Beebe, Alderman; Nicholas Dries, Constable.

    Fourteenth Ward: Christian Paesch, Johann Batten, John Laubmann, Henry Schlottinger, John Hettinger, Charles Goebel, A. L. Berger, E. Albert, F. C. Gerbing, Delegates; Philipp Steinmueller, Alderman; Karl Hahn, Constable.

    Fifteenth Ward: Joseph Huhn, Jacob Enders, Peter Memel, Delegates; [Translator's note: Eight other names are omitted.] Fred Buchanan, Alderman; Philip Paul, Constable.

    Sixteenth Ward: George Oertel, Adam Baierle, Fred Metzke, H. Kaufmann, G. A. Busse, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] D. H. Lincoln, Alderman; Christ Gragen, Constable.

    Following is the result of the Republican primary election which was held yesterday: First Ward: Jacob Beiersdorf, George W. Fritz, Peter Regitz, Nimrod Walz, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names ...

    German
    I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 09, 1867
    Yesterday's Primary Election

    Following is the result of the Republican primary election which was held yesterday:

    First Ward: Jacob Beiersdorf, George W. Fritz, Peter Regitz, Nimrod Walz, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] Joshua Knickerbocker, Alderman; George Hartmann, Constable.

    Second Ward: August Neuhaus, Christian Schell, Johann Schroeder, Karl H. Ham, Delegates; [Translator's note: Eleven other names are omitted.] Arthur Dixon, Alderman; Charles McLane, Constable.

    Third Ward: Joseph Pollock, Karl Rose, Philipp Becker, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] Karl Wicker, Alderman; Sayville Scott, Constable.

    2

    Fourth Ward: Conrad Seipp, C. Wahl, Delegates; [Translator's note: Nine other names are omitted.] Sam McCoy, Alderman; W. C. Hendricks, Constable.

    Fifth Ward: William Hausen, Paskal Schneider, Christ Eigenmann, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.] John Raber, Alderman; Peter Murphy, Constable.

    Sixth Ward: William Blanke, William Ruehl, Fred Haertig, Delegates; [Translator's note: Three other names are omitted.] Friedrich Burkhardt, Alderman; A. B. Chladeck, Constable.

    Seventh Ward: Albert Kubeck, Christ Techtmeyer, John Schenk, Delegates; [Translator's note: Six other names are omitted.] John McAllister, Alderman; William Zschokke, Constable.

    Eighth Ward: Fred Maas, N. Schneider, Jacob Link, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.] Isaac Wentworth, Alderman; Fred Haucke, Constable.

    3

    Ninth Ward: William Schade, Delegate; [Translator's note: Fourteen other names are omitted.] W. R. Carpenter, Alderman; Cyrus Keeler, Constable.

    Tenth Ward: Andrew Wemple, Otto Dehling, U. Lochbieler, Delegates; [Translator's note: Nine other names are omitted.] Edmund Bixby, Alderman; Joel Lull, Constable.

    Eleventh Ward: Henry Ackhoff, Edward S. Salomon, Charles Muenzer, H. Gade, Delegates; [Translator's note: Seven other names are omitted.] S. J. Russel, Alderman; G. Stirling, Constable.

    Twelfth Ward: August Steinhaus, Fred Yoltz, Henry Schroeder, Clement Hirsch, Louis Schultze, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.] O. W. Potter, Alderman; Fred Zschokke, Constable.

    Thirteenth Ward: Conrad Voltz, Gustave Fischer, K. G. Schmidt, Delegates; [Translator's note: Three other names are omitted.] George J. Beebe, Alderman; 4Nicholas Dries, Constable.

    Fourteenth Ward: Christian Paesch, Johann Batten, John Laubmann, Henry Schlottinger, John Hettinger, Charles Goebel, A. L. Berger, E. Albert, F. C. Gerbing, Delegates; Philipp Steinmueller, Alderman; Karl Hahn, Constable.

    Fifteenth Ward: Joseph Huhn, Jacob Enders, Peter Memel, Delegates; [Translator's note: Eight other names are omitted.] Fred Buchanan, Alderman; Philip Paul, Constable.

    Sixteenth Ward: George Oertel, Adam Baierle, Fred Metzke, H. Kaufmann, G. A. Busse, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] D. H. Lincoln, Alderman; Christ Gragen, Constable.

    Following is the result of the Republican primary election which was held yesterday: First Ward: Jacob Beiersdorf, George W. Fritz, Peter Regitz, Nimrod Walz, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names ...

    German
    I F 4, I F 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 12, 1867
    Dyhrenfurth's Institute (Editorial)

    We have repeatedly called the attention of our readers to the above excellent institution, which is probably unsurpassed by any of its kind in the entire West, and of which Chicago can justly be proud.

    A new course will begin after Easter, and we cannot forego the opportunity to recommend this widely known and highly praised school to all parents and guardians who wish to give their children a good practical education. Mr. Dyhrenfurth has set the rates for tuition exceptionally low. All the professors are recognized as able and thoroughly educated teachers, and the knowledge acquired by children who attend the Institute, and the positions which many of the graduates hold in the social and business world of our city are proof of the diligence with which the instructors apply themselves to their 2various tasks.

    The Institute consists of a classical department, a school for girls and a commercial college. There are five classes in the classical department. The three lower classes offer a preparatory course, and the two upper classes a high school course. The purpose of the preparatory course is to give the pupil a good practical education which will enable him to enter the commercial school. In the upper classes, a complete course is offered in classics and mathematics, in preparation for attendance at a university. In these classes, Greek, Latin, French, German, and English are taught; also geometry, zoology, geography, rhetoric, drawing, chemistry, mathematics, etc. Each subject is taught by a man who has specialized in that field.

    The new school for girls which Mr. Dyhrenfurth has established has received favorable recognition, and the number of pupils attending it has steadily increased. The purpose of this branch of the Institute is to give girls a 3truly "feminine" education in domestic arts and in the supervision of a household. This school fills a long-felt need and is ably presided over by Miss Lee.

    We need add nothing about the excellence of the commercial department, for it is well known among local businessmen and is recognized over the entire West. We know from experience that every businessman prefers graduates from Dyhrenfurth's Commercial Institute to all other applicants, and that the students of this school always obtain positions in the best firms.

    Recently, Mr. Dyhrenfurth established a monthly magazine under the name The College Monthly. The motto of the publication is "scientia potestas". The first issue has just reached us. It contains several very excellent and instructive articles, some of them written by teachers or professors, and others by pupils of the upper grades. They are abundant proof of the ability of both teachers and students. Thus the Institute continues to progress in 4every respect, and Mr. Dyhrenfurt is leaving nothing undone to promote the general thorough training of those who attend his school.

    We have repeatedly called the attention of our readers to the above excellent institution, which is probably unsurpassed by any of its kind in the entire West, and of which ...

    German
    II B 2 f, II A 2