The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 22, 1866
    German Citizens Meet to Discuss Instruction in German in Public Schools Official Report of Secretary

    On Wednesday evening, June 20, a meeting was held at Mr. Klein's saloon, corner of Madison and Jefferson Streets, by Germans who live in the Scammon School district. The purpose of this meeting was to discuss the introduction of German-language instruction into the public schools of the city. The meeting was very well attended, and there was evidence of great interest in this matter which is of vast interest not only to Germans, but also to Americans.

    Carl Wippo was elected chairman, and Friedrich Kurz was chosen secretary. After Mr. Wippo had opened the meeting, Mr. L. Brentano took the floor. He explained the purpose of the meeting, and pointed out--for the benefit of the Board of Education--that the legal representatives (parents or guardians) of 150 children living in the Scammon School district had demanded that the German-language be placed on the curriculum of the Scammon School. A very spirited 2discussion ensued, in which Colonel Rollshausen, Captain Schoninger, Mr. Kurz, and Friedrich Klein took a prominent part. Thereupon the following resolutions were adopted:

    "A circular explaining the purpose of the meeting shall be sent to the parents and guardians of the German children living in the district, requesting that they inform the superintendent of the Scammon School concerning the number of children each of them sends to that institution, and that they indicate their willingness to comply with the request by signing the circular.

    "The Committee of Seven which was elected at the meeting shall have the duty of compiling a list of the names of all parents and guardians of the district, German as well as American. The members of the Committee are: Friedrich Kurz, C. K. Wippo, W. Droege, Joseph Buechle, Franz Gross, F.H. Rollshausen, and F. Klein.

    "That the unselfish and faithful endeavors of L. Brentano and H. Felsenthal, 3two members of the Chicago Board of Education, who gave unstintingly of their time and talent to attain our object, are gratefully acknowledged."

    The Committee agreed upon the following division of work: Joseph Buechle will solicit signatures from parents living in the area between Lake and Fulton Streets; Mr. Droege will canvass the homes located between Lake and Randolph Streets; Mr. Kurz, between Randolph and Washington Streets; Mr. Wippo, between Washington and Madison Streets; Mr. Rollshausen, between Madison and Monroe Streets; Mr. Gross, between Monroe and Adams Streets; and Mr. Klein, south of Adams Street.

    After the Committee had agreed on the above arrangements the chairman adjourned the meeting until next Wednesday, June 27, when all citizens of the aforementioned district are invited to hear the Committee report, and then to take further steps to accomplish our aim.

    Carl Wippo,

    Johann Kurz.

    On Wednesday evening, June 20, a meeting was held at Mr. Klein's saloon, corner of Madison and Jefferson Streets, by Germans who live in the Scammon School district. The purpose ...

    German
    I A 1 b, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 23, 1866
    An Unauthorized and Treasonable Statement by the President (Editorial)

    The President of the United States has no more to do with amending the Constitution of the United States than any common citizen. The Constitution itself specifies the only two ways in which it can be legally altered. Either Congress, by a two-thirds majority of all the members of both Houses, can propose an amendment. or the legislatures of two thirds of all the States can request Congress to call a convention for the purpose of having the convention propose an amendment. In both cases, the proposal in question is submitted to the State legislatures or to State conventions especially called for the purpose, and if three fourths of the legislatures or State conventions ratify the amendment, it is to be considered a part of the Constitutions. Not even the President's signature is necessary to give such an act validity.

    In view of these constitutional provisions, it is indeed absurd and ridiculous 2for the President to inform Congress, as he did yesterday, that although his Secretary, Mr. Stewart, had sent notarized copies of the proposals to amend the Constitution to each of the Governors of the various States, still no one should infer from this fact that he, Andrew Johnson, acting President since the death of Abraham Lincoln, sanctions the amendments. It is absurd and ridiculous for this official to tell a co-ordinate branch of the Government which alone has authority to act in such matters that its procedure is unconstitutional; and it is absurd and ridiculous for Johnson constantly to repeat the old hash about the "eleven States which were not represented at one time". Congress needs neither the advice nor the instruction of President Johnson, nor does the Constitution enjoin upon him to act in such capacity. Thus his message was unauthorized.

    However, it was not only unauthorized; it was also treasonable. It was an indirect attempt to incite the Rebel States of the South and their allies in the North, the Copperheads, to resistance against these amendments, to hold out a prospect 3of help and support from the executive branch of the Government, and thus to cause dissatisfaction and strife between that part of the people who side with the President and the part that sides with Congress. Viewed from this standpoint, the message of the President is a transgression of his official authority and a violation of his official duties, and Congress ought to call him to account for his misdeeds.

    The President of the United States has no more to do with amending the Constitution of the United States than any common citizen. The Constitution itself specifies the only two ...

    German
    I J
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 25, 1866
    Cornerstone of Saint Franziskus Church Is Laid

    Yesterday afternoon, the cornerstone of Saint Franziskus(Francis) Church, which is being erected on the corner of Newberry and Twelfth Streets, was laid. An immense crowd assembled at the scene, and when the time appointed for the ceremony arrived, one could see nothing but people on and about the platform.

    As we have stated in a previous article, the building will be 66 feet wide and 160 feet long, the steeple will be 150 feet high, and the edifice as a whole will be a credit to our city.

    For the convenience of the clergymen, a temporary platform had been built immediately next to the place where the cornerstone was to be laid. At about half-past three, the procession made its appearance. It consisted of several 2Catholic societies carrying their banners and other insignia, and was led by several bands; it took up its position within the foundation of the structure and around the platform. Several Irish-Catholic societies were also represented, and a great many more of their members would have appeared if they had not been misled by statements published in a certain newspaper to believe that their presence was not desired. A large company of school children, boys and girls, the latter wearing white and blue dresses, also marched in the procession under the leadership of their teachers.

    It was four o'clock by the time the societies and the school children had taken their positions about the platform. Then Bishop Luehr, who, as we know, came from Fort Wayne, Indiana, made his appearance; he was attended by two assisting clergymen, and made a lengthy address in the English language. He informed the assembly of the purpose and significance of the act which he was about to perform, by comparing the ceremonies of the church with military ceremonies. He pointed out that just as the flag is considered to be a sacred necessity by the soldiers who gather about it, so do the faithful 3gather about the cross, the symbol of the Redeemer. [Translator's note: This badly constructed sentence is a faithful translation of the original.] The Bishop declared that the erection of a church also required certain ceremonies, especially the laying of the cornerstone. He expressed his satisfaction at seeing such a large attendance and invoked divine blessings upon the rites he was about to perform and upon the edifice and the congregation.

    Then the stone was lifted to a height of about fifteen feet, lowered, and placed in the correct position; and while the congregation sang hymns, the Bishop placed a tin box which contained various documents, newspapers, etc., into the opening provided for that purpose, sprinkled holy water upon the stone, and dropped the cornerstone into place. The Bishop then addressed the assembly in the German language, thus concluding the festivities.

    Yesterday afternoon, the cornerstone of Saint Franziskus(Francis) Church, which is being erected on the corner of Newberry and Twelfth Streets, was laid. An immense crowd assembled at the scene, and ...

    German
    III C, I B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 06, 1866
    Gymnastics in Public Schools

    In the meeting which the School Board held last evening, Inspector Brentano read a proposal of the Chicago Turn Gemeinde, requesting that gymnastics be included in the regular schedule of all public high schools, and that teachers be engaged to instruct the children in that branch of physical education. The proposal was unanimously adopted, and the Executive Board was instructed to take all necessary measures.

    In the meeting which the School Board held last evening, Inspector Brentano read a proposal of the Chicago Turn Gemeinde, requesting that gymnastics be included in the regular schedule of ...

    German
    III B 2, I A 1 a, II B 3