The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 03, 1866
    Vox Populi [Warning to Workers]

    To the Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung! An advertisement in your newspaper stated that the Chicago Employment Association, which has an office at 118 South Clark Street, wanted two hundred carpenters, and promised to secure employment for them at a wage of five dollars a day. I and two other carpenters went to the office of the Association, and after paying a fee of two dollars, we were sent to the C. R. Pool Company, in Memphis, Tennessee. Transportation cost us twelve dollars each. We traveled to Cairo via the Illinois Central Railroad (second class), thence to Memphis by steamer (second deck). Upon our arrival, we immediately went to the office of the C. R. Pool Company and were told that it neither needed nor had ordered any carpenters. Thus we were obliged to return to Chicago. We spent the money for our fares and paid the freight charges for transporting our tools, but did not attain our object. I therefore warn all workers against having 2any dealings with the Chicago Employment Association.

    Respectfully,

    Hermann Harms.

    To the Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung! An advertisement in your newspaper stated that the Chicago Employment Association, which has an office at 118 South Clark Street, wanted two hundred ...

    German
    II A 2, I D 2 c
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 24, 1866
    Germania Maennerchor

    Last Saturday evening, the Germania Maennerchor gave its first concert, which was well attended despite the extremely cold weather, which made transportation difficult. The chorus, which numbers forty members, rendered the various songs under the direction of its able conductor, Otto Lob, with precision and good taste, and the audience was very generous with its applause. It was especially delighted with "Fruehling Ohn' Ende," by C. Reinecke, and with the sailors chorus from "Afrikanerin," by G. Meyerbeer. The chorus has very good talent and will fill a long-felt need for music by a good male chorus, providing the members are faithful in attending rehearsals. Otto Lob, who also directs the Fidelia Choral Society, will begrudge neither time nor patience in his endeavor to raise the standard of the chorus so that it will compare favorably with similar organizations in New York, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. We hope that he will be successful, and we shall follow the progressive development of the Germania Maennerchor with great interest and satisfaction.

    Last Saturday evening, the Germania Maennerchor gave its first concert, which was well attended despite the extremely cold weather, which made transportation difficult. The chorus, which numbers forty members, rendered ...

    German
    II B 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 26, 1866
    A Noble Offer

    H. F. Bonnet has promised to give an entertainment for the benefit of Bernhard Wiedinger's School, which is located on the North Side (La Salle Street near Chicago Avenue). Although the expenses will amount to at least $200, Mr. Bonnet said he would charge only $100, which would take care of the most necessary items. This figure could be greatly reduced if the charges for rent, advertising, and music could be eliminated. Mr. Bonnet, whose entire company will donate its services, will do the managing and will make all the necessary arrangements, so that the school committee will merely have to sell the tickets.

    The directors of the school association have tried to avoid soliciting help from Americans. They are proud because only Germans have purchased bonds, and they have the satisfaction of knowing that the school building has been erected through none but German donations. Their motto is: "Education through the school and education through the stage!" [Translator's 2note: the school referred to in this article was established by local Americans of German descent for the purpose of "perpetuating a knowledge of the German language among their children and children's children".]

    H. F. Bonnet has promised to give an entertainment for the benefit of Bernhard Wiedinger's School, which is located on the North Side (La Salle Street near Chicago Avenue). Although ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 30, 1866
    Chicago Needs a Swimming School and a Public Bath (Editorial)

    The meeting to discuss Chicago's need for a swimming school and public bath, which was to have been held last Saturday in Room 5 of the Courthouse, had to be postponed until next Saturday, March 31, (tomorrow), because so few people appeared at Saturday's meeting.

    The indifference of the German public toward useful institutions in general has become proverbial, and if we view our social conditions more closely, we can readily explain this apathy toward a matter which is so important to the comfort, health, and progress of our citizens.

    With the exception of our Turnhalle, we Germans have no other building devoted to the cultivation of art and science--at least no building of which we need not be ashamed--and in this respect some small country towns are far more 2progressive than ours. Milwaukee has magnificent school buildings in which German teachers are employed; it has two good theatres, a fine park, a swimming school, and splendid hotels--all built and maintained by Germans.

    Why must Chicago be without these public institutions which are indispensable to the residents of a large city?

    There is no lack of money, nor of a desire to participate in enterprises which benefit the community; but our people have not the necessary time to devote to a successful undertaking. I was literally "swamped" with questions concerning the action taken in the meeting with reference to a swimming school, and everybody regretted that nothing had been done.

    "I think it would be too bad if nothing came of it, for a swimming school is so pleasant, so convenient, so necessary to health;" and "I shall be happy to do my part," were some of the remarks made to me--and yet nobody came to the meeting. After leaving the Courthouse at eight o'clock, I visited the 3nearby saloons. There I found meetings galore and an "abundance of time". I would not have said anything about building a swimming school; but many asked that I express myself on the subject, since very few persons have clear and definite ideas on the matter and few, therefore, have made an effort to co-operate. That is not a valid reason to remain away from the meeting, for the purpose of the meeting was to discuss the matter, to inform, to exchange ideas. Now I do not consider my opinions to be decisive. I merely wished to introduce the matter and to contribute my mite to the success of the good cause, just as anyone else would have done; and I ask the kind reader to weigh my opinions in that spirit.

    I would build the swimming school and public bath after the pattern of the "Diana Bath" at Vienna, Austria. This structure is a hall 250 feet long and 150 feet wide. The roof is arched, the framework is of steel and the ceiling is of glass. The pool is about 200 feet long and 100 feet wide; two thirds of the pool is 15 feet deep, one third--used for bathing--is 51/2 feet deep, and the pool is made of wood.... [Translator's note: The next sentence of 4this paragraph is too obscure to be read.]

    The water is pumped from the Danube by means of a steam engine and flows constantly, while part of the water in the pool drains constantly. Ample provisions for ventilation have been made; the large windows of the wall and a part of the roof can be opened. Bathtubs have not been forgotten; and there are sofas, chairs, a reading room, and smoking rooms. The ground surrounding the building has been landscaped, and presents a beautiful view to visitors.

    It cannot be denied that institutions like the one described above are a credit and a benefit to the cities which erect and maintain them. They are also a source of lucrative financial gain; the income derived from them is enormous and the operating cost low. Chicago's facilities for constructing and maintaining a swimming pool and public bath are much better than those of Vienna; for Chicago has its waterworks and can pump the necessary water to any location at any time. When the new water tunnel has been finished 5we will always have water that is as clear as crystal, and no doubt our City Fathers will donate the water, since it is to be used for so beneficial a purpose. Of course it all depends upon who takes the matter in hand. I am firmly convinced that under such favorable circumstances and under good management the bonds sold to defray the cost of erecting a pool and bath would soon be worth double their par value, and would be a very good investment. All persons interested in the enterprise should meet very soon, each should subscribe for a one hundred-dollar bond, and when a sufficient amount has been raised in this way, a piece of ground should be purchased. When this has been done, there need be no worry about the completion of the project. It is therefore very desirable that the meeting tomorrow evening be well attended. I wish to add that the water that is pumped into the pool could be kept at an even temperature by heating the pipe that is connected with the pool.

    The meeting to discuss Chicago's need for a swimming school and public bath, which was to have been held last Saturday in Room 5 of the Courthouse, had to be ...

    German
    I M
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 30, 1866
    Of Chicago Arbeiterverein

    Chicago, Illinois, March 21, 1866.

    To the Honorable Board of police Commissioners of the city of Chicago: The Chicago Arbeiterverein has elected the undersigned to act as a committee for the purpose of bringing about an understanding with your honorable Board, in regard to certain issues, and we beg permission to present the following matters:

    Through the newspapers and other sources of information we have learned that the members of two other societies, or associations, have been informed that they must discontinue their recreational activities on Sunday evenings. Of course, the Arbeiterverein has nothing to do with the recreation of other organizations, nor do we wish to express our opinions concerning the motives for the Board's action against these societies. However, during the past few weeks, one of these periodic religious movements, generally called "revivals," 2has been in process, and the Chicago Arbeiterverein, always intent upon avoiding any offense against citizen who differ with our religious opinions, takes the view that during the past eight years (the past four under police protection) these "revivals," usually held on Sunday evenings, have taken the form of a kind of social entertainment (sic). Therefore, we ask: Does the above mentioned notice also apply to our organization?

    We are aware that you have the right to answer: Wait until you receive notice; but, as loyal citizens, we would not like to offend against any law, nor would we like to suffer the consequences of not knowing the law, nor do we want our members to be taken by surprise by a policeman and disturbed in their innocent and harmless amusements which are in complete accord with the religious liberty guar-anteed by the Constitution, nor do we need an excuse to be provided to make us responsible for an offense against any state law that is in agreement with the spirit of the Constitution,

    Should our social entertainments be prohibited by order of your Board, we would respectfully point cut that in 1861 the Board of Police Commissioners entered 3into the following pact with the president of our society:

    1. The President will be responsible for the maintenance of order, and the police shall not interfere with our social entertainment;

    2. No brass musical instruments shall be used at such entertainments, out of respect for the religious convictions of our fellow citizens, and one or more violins, but only one flute, bass violin, or piano shall be used.

    3. The police will not consider these entertainments to be "illegal," as long as the concerts and dances do not disturb the neighborhood.

    The Arbeiterverein has strictly observed these conditions despite contradictions by a newspaper, the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, two part owners of which were expelled from the organization on account of their loud, mischievous conduct; they even went so far as to break up one of our public meetings and to slander everybody who did not agree with their arrogant opinions.

    We trust that your honorable Board will pay no attention to the malicious 4utterances which these "snakes" publish against our society. Had they conducted themselves in an orderly manner, they would still be members of our society.

    We do not advertise our entertainments, nor do we invite strangers to participate in them. We have a Committee on Order and a Committee of Ushers who admit only members or strangers who are accompanied or invited by members, and the members must give their word of honor that they can vouch for and will be responsible for the behavior of these strangers.

    The money which is realized through our entertainments is the property of the organization and is used for defraying the expenses incurred by maintaining our library and reading room, and for the support of sick members or their dependent widows and orphans.

    [Translator's note: The next (final) paragraph of this article has evidently 5been "removed" by rats or mice, so it is not possible to offer a translation.]

    We hope most sincerely that you will permit the Arbeiterverein to continue its Sunday evening entertainments under the conditions which were previously agreed upon.

    Very respectfully,

    C. Degenhardt,

    C. Haussner,

    T. Hielscher,

    Ed. Schlaeger.

    Chicago, Illinois, March 21, 1866. To the Honorable Board of police Commissioners of the city of Chicago: The Chicago Arbeiterverein has elected the undersigned to act as a committee for ...

    German
    I B 2, III B 2, II D 10, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 08, 1866
    Liquor Licenses (Editorial)

    Apparently, the municipal authorities in New York are very strict in issuing licenses to saloons. The License Committee seems to be resolved to grant no license to music halls, "polka cellars," or to places where criminals and vagabonds meet. The New York Democrat reports the following cases, from which the method of procedure of the authorities may be deduced:

    A hotelkeeper in James Street was informed that no rooming house (rendezvous of prostitutes, etc.) would receive a license to dispense liquor. All applications from people who wanted to operate in buildings located on Mission Place were rejected because the Commission had received protests from respectable citizens against permitting the "whiskey joints" to continue 2their business on that street. Proprietors of music halls on Chatham and Williams Streets were told that it was contrary to the public welfare to to grant them saloon concessions. A saloonkeeper on water Street could not renew his license because seven of his "customers" had been sent to the penitentiary. All applications from Poll Street were rejected because Captain Jourvon reported that every saloon on that street was a meeting place of hoodlums. several hotelkeepers received a license on the promise that they would not permit women or girls to congregate or partake of liquors in the barroom.

    It would not be a bad idea if the municipal authorities of Chicago would exercise the same care when issuing licenses to sell liquor. In this city every disorderly house can obtain a license, and when a man who is not familiar with conditions here, or with the character of the various houses, enters one of these "licensed dispensaries" to buy a glass of beer, it may easily happen that he will have to spend the night on sawdust and that 3he must pay a contribution to the treasury of the police court the next day.

    It may be well to add that in New York no proprietors of grocery stores can obtain a license to sell liquor.

    Apparently, the municipal authorities in New York are very strict in issuing licenses to saloons. The License Committee seems to be resolved to grant no license to music halls, "polka ...

    German
    I B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 08, 1866
    Statement

    Chicago, Illinois,

    May 7, 1866.

    After having served faithfully, and, I believe successfully, on the editorial staff of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, for five years, the undersigned hereby gives notice that he has severed his connection with that publication.

    Wilhelm Rapp

    Chicago, Illinois,

    May 8, 1866.

    In Mr. Wilhelm Rapp, whose affiliation with the Illinois Staats-Zeitung was terminated yesterday, as may be seen from the above statement, we have lost a very able associate, and we regret that he is leaving us. He has devoted five 2years of faithful and efficient service to this newspaper, giving his time and talents during a very trying period.

    Beginning today, Dr. Adolph Wiesner, for many years the Baltimore and New York correspondent of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung and formerly editor of the Turnzeitung, will take the place of Wilhelm Rapp in our editorial department.

    Illinois Staats-Zeitung Company.

    Chicago, Illinois, May 7, 1866. After having served faithfully, and, I believe successfully, on the editorial staff of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, for five years, the undersigned hereby gives notice that ...

    German
    II B 2 d 1, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 01, 1866
    Public Parks (Editorial)

    The City Council has finally passed an ordinance making it unlawful to inter bodies in the old City Cemetery, the Catholic Cemetery on the North Side, or anywhere within the city limits. This law is of great importance to the residents of the North Side, for now there are prospects that the plan to establish a public park will be carried out.

    As everyone knows, the northern art of the City Cemetery was separated from the southern part last year for the purpose of laying it out for a public park. All that is necessary now to establish a park is a liberal appropriation of money and the City Council ought not hesitate to provide the needed funds immediately. The law forbidding interments south of the projected park site will cause many families who have buried the bodies 2of loved ones in the City Cemetery to purchase lots in some other burial ground and to remove the bodies to the new place. Thus the city will soon have the opportunity to buy back the lots which it sold and to increase the size of the park. It certainly is a shame that Chicago, large and wealthy as it is, has not yet succeeded in establishing a good park where our citizens can enjoy the fresh air and the freedom of movement which are so vitally necessary to good health. what some people of this city now call parks are nothing but an insult to the intelligence of the average citizen.

    The City Council has finally passed an ordinance making it unlawful to inter bodies in the old City Cemetery, the Catholic Cemetery on the North Side, or anywhere within the ...

    German
    I F 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 12, 1866
    Report of Agent of German Society for the Protection of Immigrants for the Month of May 1866.

    Following is the report of my activities during the month of May, 1866:

    Applications for work 279
    Secured employment for 214
    Letters received 33
    Letters written 40
    Families aided financially 15
    Information and advice given to 132
    Located baggage for 4
    Secured railroad passes for 7
    Depots and landing places visited 14
    Caused arrest of "runners" 2
    Secured passage at cost of Society 2
    Issued recommendations to 26
    2

    On May 20, I found Mrs. Henriette Stroeger, widow of an immigrant who died en voyage, her infant child, and her sister lying sick and helpless near the Milwaukee Railroad depot. I had them brought to the Hospital for Women and Children, on Ohio Street where they were restored to health at the Society's expense. Another immigrant who was brought to this institution was treated gratis by Dr. G. Schloetzer. This man has not yet recovered from his illness.

    Our Police Commissioner should place a special policeman who is able to speak both English and German at the various depots to protect travelers, especially immigrants; this officer ought to be present at the arrival and departure of every immigrant train to see to it that immigrants are not mistreated or defrauded by railroad agents, confidence men, expressmen, or by "runners" or proprietors of saloons and hotels which are patronized by immigrants. By making it the sole duty of a policeman to patrol the depots and landing places, the Police Commissioner would do much to prevent the many just complaints that I hear frequently.

    3

    Immigrants who travel from New York to Iowa are often forced to pay the transportation charges on excess baggage from Chicago to Iowa twice, once in New York and again in Chicago, at the depot of the Galena division of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. This railroad will accept a ticket issued by the railroad agent in Castel Gardens, New York only if the weight of the baggage is written thereon plainly in ink, so that the charges on excess baggage for the trip from Chicago to Iowa can be collected from the agent at New York. However, these agents are frequently intent upon their own interests and they use a lead pencil rather than pen and ink. The figures recording the amount of excess baggage are then written so illegibly on the tickets that the officers of the Northwestern Railroad refuse to accept them as valid. I have brought these facts to the attention of the Commissioner of Immigration stationed at Castle Gardens, New York, and shall follow up the matter until it is disposed of in favor of immigrants.

    On May 30, Mr. Thiener, a German immigrant, bought his passage from Chicago 4to Gillmon, Illinois from the agent of the Illinois Central Railroad. The fare is $3.65. Mr. Thiener gave the agent a twenty-franc piece, expecting to receive $1.35, the premium of exchange, in return. The agent refused to pay the premium, as did the acting superintendent of the railroad when I complained to him. The latter informed me that their agent had been instructed to accept gold or paper money but not to refund the prevalent premium on gold, and that none of the railroads of the West were accepting gold at the market value. Therefore, our German citizens ought to warn all immigrants with whom they come in contact against paying gold for railroad passage.

    About a thousand trunks and other articles--among them much baggage that belongs to German immigrants--is stored in the warehouse of the Illinois and Michigan Central Railroad, where they are kept for two years. Could not these railroads show their appreciation for the many dollars the public pays into their coffers by publishing an exact list of these articles in local newspapers?

    5

    W. C. Boeckmann and Johann Colljung, who arrived here via the steamship "England", which left Liverpool on March 29, have asked me to issue the following warning: The English steamship "England" sailed from Liverpool with 1,312 passengers aboard; 667 of these died at sea or in quarantine at Halifax. There were 563 German immigrants on the ship, and about one half of them died. The food that was served during the voyage was of very poor quality; the fish and the potatoes were spoiled. The rooms on the ship were overcrowded, the ventilation in the steerage was very poor, and everywhere there was filth. Many German passengers were "relieved" of their baggage, or their baggage was taken from them, by health officers at Halifax, who made no reimbursement.

    Frequently, immigrants complain that the transportation of baggage from Baltimore to Chicago by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad leaves much to be desired. This company has not yet introduced the check system, and although C. F. Hillebrand, the Baltimore and Ohio agent at Baltimore, always assures immigrants that their baggage will arrive at Chicago at the same time they 6do, they often must wait ten to fourteen days at Chicago, or continue their journey without their belongings.

    In conclusion, I wish to acknowledge and commend the conduct of John H. Gund, a Police Sergeant, who so kindly and sympathetically cared for the needs of the family of M. J. J. Tagg, who was friendless and destitute when he arrived in this city.

    Ernst J. Knnobelsdorff, Agent.

    Following is the report of my activities during the month of May, 1866: <table> <tr> <td>Applications for work</td> <td>279</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Secured employment for</td> <td>214</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Letters received</td> <td>33</td> ...

    German
    II D 10, III G, II D 8
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 13, 1866
    The Theater "Robert and Bertram"

    Sunday's performance, as well as yesterday's, was a complete success, and proves that the local German public knows how to appreciate a really good play.

    The house was overcrowded on Sunday, and the attendance on Monday was also very gratifying to the actors. On both evenings, the audience was kept in continual laughter, and the constant applause was sufficient assurance to the players that their efforts were successful.

    We must admit that, as far as comedy is concerned, we have never seen anything better or more comical than "Robert and Bertram". The play fairly teems with "queer" situations and funny remarks, and we do not hesitate to recommend it to all hypochondriacs as a remedy.

    The scenery is very good, the stage arrangements, decorations, and costumes 2are everything one could desire, and, as for the performance itself, we do not hesitate to rate it as the best that we have seen in this country. The entire cast deserves unrestricted praise.

    The two "jolly vagabonds," Mr. Ahlfeldt and Mr. Pelost, are truly unsurpassable, and their natural wit kept the audience laughing continually. Mrs. Pelost played the part of Mrs. Ippelmeier, and Mrs. Yelguth enacted the role of Isidora Ippelmeier. Both actresses are to be commended for their marvelous performance. The Veilguth brothers also played their parts well and added no little to the success of the play. Mrs. Obernsdoerfer was truly charming in the role of Roessel. All in all, we must say that the Pelost Company is a well-trained group. There are no unnecessary interruptions in the performance, all the members have memorized their lines well, and everything is done smoothly.

    After such success, we do not have the least doubt that this comedy will draw a full house during the entire week, and we advise every lover of the theater, 3and every one who wishes to spend a pleasant evening. To attend one of the performances at the German House during the current week.

    "Robert and Bertram" will be played every night this week, beginning at 8 P. M. Tickets are seventy-five cents for box seats and fifty cents for seats in the pit.

    Sunday's performance, as well as yesterday's, was a complete success, and proves that the local German public knows how to appreciate a really good play. The house was overcrowded on ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1