The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 01, 1864
    Dedication of the Turnhalle

    Yesterday's opening of the new Turnhalle was one of the most joyful events in the history of the Garden City. Before describing the dedicatory ceremonies to our readers, we shall depict the building. The facade is built in the neo-Italian style and presents a pretty picture in its festive decorations. At the peak of the facade, the American flag waves proudly, symbolizing the patriotism of those good sons of Germany who will make the Turnhalle the scene of much future social and intellectual activity.

    We shall try to acquaint our readers with this building, which is so arranged that it will adequately meet all the demands for which it has been erected.

    The building site, which has been leased for a period of ten years, is 101 by 160 feet, and is conveniently located, being readily accessible by streetcar from the north and the south. In accordance with the plan of the architect, 2Mr. H. Rehwoldt, the building covers only a part of the plot, eaving sufficient room for open-air gymnastics. Mr. Paesch supervised the masonry work, and Mr. Schmidt and Mr. Katz were the carpenter contractors.

    The Halle is a two-story building of solid frame construction. The foundation is of stone. The structure is about 50 feet high, 73 feet wide, and 142 feet long. The first floor contains a spacious vestibule, from which a ten-foot stairway leads to the second story: There is a billiard room, 30 by 24 feet, on the first floor; also a club-room, 30 by 24 feet, with door to the street; and a long bar for the refreshment of thirsty souls. The basement contains the gymnasium, which is 70 by 65 by 24 feet, with an area of nearly 5,000 square feet. Here we find various types of apparatus for exercise. On the left side of the building, there is a reading room, a dining room, and a bedroom for the caretaker.

    The dance hall occupies most of the second story. The devotees of Terpsichore 3will have an area of 7,700 square feet to practice their art. Thus the dance hall is one of the largest in Chicago, equalling the space in Bryan's Hall and having many advantages which other halls do not offer. To prevent any danger in an emergency, the dance hall is provided with fine wide doors, and the large stairway is accessible from two directions. Two stairways lead to the lower floor and basement where they are connected with outside doors, and there is a special stairway from the stage to the gymnasium. A special room, 20 by 22 feet, containing a wardrobe, wash stand, and toilet, has been provided for the comfort and convenience of the ladies. A room with like conveniences has been furnished for the men.

    Two stairways lead from the vestibule of the second floor to the galleries, which are located on each side of the dance hall. Two rooms have been arranged on the second floor for the general comfort of the dancers. These rooms are furnished with card tables, and, no doubt, will be the scene of many card parties.

    4

    Two large heating plants have been built in the basement and will supply the whole building with the necessary warmth. A kitchen has been arranged immediately under the dining room, and a dumb waiter has been installed for the convenience of cooks and waiters. The basement also contains a large beer cellar and toilets. Mr. Becker did all the tinwork, Mr. Lampatner furnished the gas appliances, Williams & Wiseman did the glazing and decorating, and Mr. Lester installed the heating equipment; and, in the opinion of experts, these men did their work very well.

    Mr. John W. Doehler furnished the decorations for the dedication. The stage was graced by a bust of Father Jahn, the founder of German gymnastics. His likeness reminds one of the days when the turner movement was in its infancy, and the memory furnishes a delightful contract between those dreary days and the present. The members of the Turngemeinde formed a semicircle on the stage, above which places were reserved for officials, speakers, the building committee, and reporters.

    5

    At 3:30 P. M., Mr. August Becker gave the keys of the Turnhalle to the representative of the building committee, Mr. Huhn, who in turn handed them to the chairman of the executive board. Thereupon, Mr. B. Wiedinger, the president of the Turngemeinde, thanked all the men who had participated in the erection of the new building. Addresses were made by Mrs. Kenkel, Wilhelm Rapp, and Mr. Foellger.

    In the evening a concert was given. The program was very good, and delighted the assembly. Festivities will be concluded tomorrow evening with a grand ball.

    Yesterday's opening of the new Turnhalle was one of the most joyful events in the history of the Garden City. Before describing the dedicatory ceremonies to our readers, we shall ...

    German
    II B 3, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 06, 1864
    The Conscription Act Petition to Congress by the Chicago Arbeiterverein

    We are publishing the petition which the Chicago Arbeiterverein sent to Congress, and we urge all private citizens, as well as societies in other cities, to submit similar petitions to our national legislature. Since the drawing of numbers has been postponed until February 15, there is ample time to agitate for the devising of a just system of military administration. The petition of the Chicago Arbeiterverein reads as follows: "To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America:

    "Your petitioners, citizens of the City of Chicago, County of Cook, State of Illinois, most respectfully point out that, in their opinion, the congressional law commonly called the 'Conscription Act,' should not only be amended in regard to certain provisions, but should also be fundamentally 2changed: it should be based upon such principles as will render it sufficiently effective to procure the best soldiers without being unduly oppressive to the people.

    "We, therefore, recommend that you, as the representatives of the people, embody the following fundamental principles in the Conscription Act:

    "1) From this day until the Rebellion has been completely suppressed, the following are subject to military duty:

    "a) Every American citizen;

    "b) Every resident of the United States who has declared his intention of becoming an American citizen.

    "c) Every resident of the United States, who, though he has not declared his intention of becoming a citizen, has through continued tenure of real 3estate, or through the operation of a business or industry under the protection of the law, has indicated, or will so indicate, that he has selected this country as his permanent home. This provision shall apply to all residents (as described above) who are between the ages of twenty and forty-five.

    "2) The persons described in sub-paragraph c may evade military service by leaving the country for which they have no sympathy when the country is in great danger.

    "3) Men who are able to perform military service are to be divided into two classes. The first class shall consist of all men who were single at at the time the law was enacted and of all childless widowers between the ages of twenty and forty-five. The second class shall consist of all others who are subject to military duty; these are not to be called to 4service until all men of the first class have been enrolled.

    "4) The first class shall be enrolled for active service by the competent authorities.

    "5) No substitution or redemption or any other form of exemption shall be permitted.

    "6) Only those shall be exempt from active service who are physically or mentally unfit, or who must support orphaned or minor sisters or brothers, or aged or feeble parents.

    "7) Convicted criminals shall be considered unworthy to serve in the armed forces of the United States.

    5

    "We believe that the principles of justice, equality, and propriety recommend such a law; a law like that outlined above would place our strong young men at the disposal of the Government, and commerce and industry would not be seriously hampered by their absence; it would provide through taxation the material necessary to carry on the war, and would do away with conscription by lottery, thus placing rich and poor on the same level, simplifying conscription, and giving the greatest possible satisfaction. [Translator's note: The recommendations of the Arbeiterverein contain no apparent reference to taxation.]

    "If the members of your honorable body will take the trouble of perusing the pages of history, they will find that a law similar to the one which we recommend was passed by the National Convention of France at a time when internal rioting and foreign despotism threatened to extinguish the light of liberty in that country, and that this conscription law saved France.

    6

    "The Committee:

    "A. C. Hesing, Theodor Hilscher,

    Colonel Knobelsdorf, L. Brentano;

    Wilhelm Haase, president;

    J. Greenbaum, secretary."

    We are publishing the petition which the Chicago Arbeiterverein sent to Congress, and we urge all private citizens, as well as societies in other cities, to submit similar petitions to ...

    German
    III B 1, IV, I G, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 05, 1864
    German Ladies Meet in New Turnhalle

    In response to the appeal of Mr. Johann Gindele, a number of German ladies of Chicago met in the new Turnhalle to discuss matters referred to in the appeal. Mr. Gindele had invited Mr. Heinrich Greenbaum to be present at the meeting. After Mr. Gindele had opened the meeting, the organization work was completed by the election of Mr. Heinrich Greenbaum as secretary. Following a lengthy debate, the resolutions given below were adopted. All the delegates who were elected are requested to meet on Wednesday afternoon in the new Turnhalle. Meetings of the American Ladies' Aid are held every Saturday afternoon at two o'clock in Light Guard Hall, corner of State and Randolph Streets.

    [The Resolutions]

    "Whereas, Prominent members of the Association for the Relief of Soldiers' Families have expressed the wish that the German ladies join the above-named organization for the purpose of investigating the claims or requests of the wives 2of German soldiers, and of generally promoting the noble cause of the Association; be it hereby

    "Resolved, That it has long been the desire of the German ladies to be actively engaged in the work of supporting the dependents of soldiers, and that we therefore gladly join the Association for the Relief of Soldiers' Families, assuming that our representatives will be considered to be, and will be treated as, full-fledged members; and be it further

    "Resolved, That the following ladies be requested to represent the German residents: Mrs. Elizabeth Schneider, Mrs. Caspar Butz, Mrs. Caroline Schurz, [names of twelve others omitted in translation]; and be it further

    "Resolved, That the minutes of this meeting shall be published in the German newspapers, and that a copy of these resolutions shall be sent to the 3Association for the Relief of Soldiers' Families.

    "J. G. Gindele, president."

    "A. Greenbaum, secretary."

    In response to the appeal of Mr. Johann Gindele, a number of German ladies of Chicago met in the new Turnhalle to discuss matters referred to in the appeal. Mr. ...

    German
    II D 10, IV, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 05, 1864
    The State Savings Institution (Editorial)

    In yesterday's Evening Journal, the following notice appeared under the above heading:

    "The undersigned merchants and businessmen of Chicago do hereby unite in condemning the course pursued by the Illinois Staats-Zeitung in creating a panic and causing a 'run' on the above-named institution. We have every reason to believe that the bank is sound--that it is able and willing to pay all its obligations on demand--and that it has a large surplus of assets (readily convertible into cash) in excess of all liabilities. Depositors who have any doubts concerning the solvency of the bank, and who have any fears for their money, can verify the sound condition of the bank and its ability to pay by calling upon any merchant or banker in Chicago."

    2

    Since the Illinois Staats-Zeitung is published in the German language, and since none of the signers of the above notice is, to our knowledge, sufficiently conversant with that tongue, we should like to ask, with all due respect, whether the gentlemen who have united in condemning the course of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung have any positive knowledge of the course which they are so prompt in condemning? From the assurance given in the above notice that the bank is sound, we have every reason to believe, indeed we are firmly convinced, that our self-appointed judges were incorrectly led to the opinion that we had attacked the solvency or soundness of the State Savings Institution. Anybody who is able to read the Illinois-Staats-Zeitung can see that such was not the case, and that nobody would regret the inability of this bank to pay its liabilities more than we, inasmuch as all the creditors of said institution are our own countrymen.

    The signers of the above notice are, of course aware, that the Illinois Savings Institution has for the last four years used the advertising columns of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung to recommend its services, and that the Illinois 3Staats-Zeitung often commented very favorably upon the safety of the charter of said financial institution. This advertisement was not changed after August 1, 1863, when the Illinois Savings Institution began to operate under a new charter. In January, 1864, the accounts of the depositors were transferred from the Illinois Savings Institution to the State Savings Institution without any notice whatever to the depositors. In fact, none of the depositors were aware that the Institution has been changed from a savings bank to a discount bank. The advertisement of the Illinois Savings Institution was not withdrawn or altered in our columns, and depositors who could not read English were led, under the circumstances, to believe from the advertisements still appearing in our columns that they had invested in the Illinois Savings Institution, whereas in reality their funds had been transferred to the State Savings Institution.

    We would have justly been considered guilty of gross negligence in the performance of our duties as public journalists if, by withholding notice of this transfer from our readers, we had assisted in persuading our countrymen to 4believe that they still had their money in a savings bank when in reality it was deposited in a discount bank.

    We hope the signers of the above notice have exercised greater care in their investigation of the affairs of the State Savings Institution, before vouching for its solvency and soundness, than in their determination of the course taken by the Illinois Staats-Zeitung before uniting to condemn that course. Would not the gentlemen who have appointed themselves judges of our procedure do better to unite in condemning the course of the managers of the State Savings Institution?

    In yesterday's Evening Journal, the following notice appeared under the above heading: "The undersigned merchants and businessmen of Chicago do hereby unite in condemning the course pursued by the Illinois ...

    German
    II A 2, II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 12, 1864
    The Tribune, Supervisors, and Bounties

    "To the Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung: In one of its famous sensational articles, the Tribune takes the liberty of condemning the County Board's procedure with respect to county bounties. The Tribune does not want the members of the Board to pay bounties to veterans. Although these veterans, who left their homes and relatives, who risked their businesses and their health in the defense of Old Glory, who won the recognition of their superiors in more than one great battle, are now ready to join the army again for the purpose of wiping out every vestige of the Rebellion; and although the Board of Supervisors had already given the county's word of honor (December 11, 1863) that all who enlist up to the time when the county's quota is filled, would receive the bounty, yet the Tribune is opposed to paying the bounty to veterans.

    "Oh, no! says the 'Greatest Newspaper'. It might be permissible to give these veterans a present if the county could afford to do so; however, the taxpayers 2cannot afford it. Yes, a present! What kind of language is that? Why does the Tribune talk of 'army-beggars', while it is dwelling on the subject!

    "And are these scarred veterans perhaps beggars, county dependents? Is this the gratitude the country owes its defenders? Is this the way to encourage recruiting? Only yesterday the Tribune informed its readers that among the members of seventy-one regiments there were only forty-nine men who had re-enlisted, and then it asks the reason why the other veterans did not again join the armed forces? Does the Tribune believe that these seasoned soldiers, one of whom is worth as much as three inexperienced raw recruits, can be persuaded to re-enter the army when it is published that they will not receive the bounty which is to be paid to new recruits--to people who were privileged to go about their regular business during the last two or three years, to make money and enjoy the comforts of home life? Such ingratitude and lack of patriotism is a disgrace!

    3

    The truth of the matter is that the publishers of the Tribune and their ilk do not want any bounties whatever paid. The reasons which they have offered are merely a subterfuge. They have become wealthy while the veterans were fighting the battles of the country; they have amassed large fortunes and do not want to decrease their surplus money by paying taxes. There's the rub. Of course, it is not considered polite to speak so frankly. Our local 'loyal' citizens would not stand for it. That is why they advance the argument that the veterans have already enlisted(which is not true, according to yesterday's article) and that therefore it is not necessary to pay them a bounty.

    "The Tribune also states that all veterans should receive the same treatment in regard to presents, and that no presents should be given, if it is not possible to 'remember' all. What fine logic, indeed! Because it is not possible to do justice to a hundred, ninety-nine must be dealt with unjustly!!

    "The article in the Tribune was written and published with the intention of 4preventing capitalists from buying county bonds, and thus putting an end to enlisting. Now we wonder just what our loyal citizens have to say about such 'patriotic' conduct?

    "Justice."

    Editor's note: We could not refuse a request by a member of the Board of Supervisors that we publish the above letter. However, we do not wish to give the impression that we are in full accord with all the insinuations which the writer makes against the Tribune. We approve of the action of the Board of Supervisors with respect to granting bounties, as we stated in our columns yesterday, and we believe it would have been a grave injustice to exclude veterans who have already enlisted. The Tribune has the right to disagree with our opinion, just as anybody has the right to harbor a wrong opinion and thus to make himself the laughing stock of thinking and fair-minded people. But we do not think that there is sufficient reason to state that 5the attitude of the Tribune emanates from low, dishonest, and unpatriotic motives.

    "To the Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung: In one of its famous sensational articles, the Tribune takes the liberty of condemning the County Board's procedure with respect to county bounties. ...

    German
    I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 15, 1864
    Republican Candidates for Alderman (Editorial)

    Never before have the Republican citizens of the city of Chicago nominated better aldermanic candidates than those whose names appear above this article. Most of the candidates who were nominated in the recent primaries are widely known as patriotic, honest, and able men. Among the eighteen aspirants there are five Germans, to whom their countrymen may justly point with great pride, and who will undoubtedly do their full duty if elected.

    Peter Shimp has been a member of the City Council for two years. Originally he was not elected as a party man, both parties the Republican as well as the Democratic, having voted for Shimp, who at that time was a Douglas Democrat. When the Copperheads came into control of the city administration, they believed that Peter Shimp could be "persuaded" by the party whip to vote for their 2measures; but Mr. Shimp was too good a patriot and Union man to betray his country. He abided faithfully by the last statement which Stephen A. Douglas made: "Now (during the war) there can be only traitors and patriots"; and Peter Shimp turned his back upon the former and took his rightful place among the latter.

    John Raber is known to the Republicans of Chicago as an old and faithful friend of the Union and of the cause of liberty. He served the city as collector for two years, and his final accounting proved that in him the Germans had furnished an official who administered the financial affairs of the city conscientiously and ably. He will perform the duties of an alderman equally well.

    Anton Hottinger has served the people of his ward as alderman since the last municipal election. Had Mr. Hottinger been a member of the party that had a majority in the City Council, or, rather, had Mr. Hottinger's party been in the majority, he would have succeeded in doing much good for the city and for 3his ward, for there is hardly a Republican alderman in the City Council who is more respected and has more influence than Mr. Hottinger. We hope that during his next term he will have the pleasure and opportunity of fighting on the side of a Republican majority.

    Gustav Fischer was elected to the Board of Supervisors last fall, and the fact that he was nominated without opposition is proof that the citizens of the Thirteenth Ward are entirely satisfied with his services. Mr. Fischer has been a Deputy Sheriff for a long time, and likewise in this office he has proved to be an able, reliable, and willing servant, thus winning the respect of his fellow citizens.

    C. B. Lindemann is not known to the voters, since he has not yet held public office. We cannot, therefore, cite his public record to prove that he is able and trustworthy. However, we have known Mr. Lindemann well for a long time, and can predict that he will be an excellent alderman; in fact, we congratulate the Republican party upon its choice of a candidate. Mr. Lindemann has always 4been identified with the great party of liberty and has been active in the promulgation of its principles. He deserves the honor which has been bestowed upon him and should be given a seat among the City Fathers. We are confident that the citizens who nominated him will do everything in their power to elect him by a great majority.

    The Sixteenth Ward is a ward in which it will require great effort to elect a Republican; however, nothing but this effort is required, and the victory will be won if our citizens do their duty. We refer all those who have any doubts on this score to the results of last fall, when the Republicans in the Sixteenth Ward succeeded in electing Charles Drandorff to the Board of Supervisors. What was possible then, is not only possible again, but can be accomplished with much less difficulty, since a great many people who voted the Democratic ticket at that time have left the Democratic party, because it is controlled by the Chicago Times. So let us take courage and work diligently, and C. B. Lindemann will represent the Sixteenth Ward in the City Council.

    Christian Techtmeier won the nomination in the Seventh Ward. He is one of 5the oldest settlers of Chicago, a man of the people, a worker in the true sense of the word. We are happy that the voters of the Seventh Ward have shown by their choice of a candidate that they want to be represented only by men who have the welfare of the country and their community at heart. The fact that Mr. Techtmeier enjoys the respect of his neighbors, and of the residents of his ward in general, is a strong indication that he will be elected.

    Never before have the Republican citizens of the city of Chicago nominated better aldermanic candidates than those whose names appear above this article. Most of the candidates who were nominated ...

    German
    I F 1, IV, I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 23, 1864
    Seamstresses Strive for Increase in Wages (Editorial)

    If any class of workers deserves sympathy and support in its endeavors to obtain an increase in wages, it is the seamstresses. In an earlier article, we described the sad plight of the women and girls who work in the garment factories in New York. We emphasized the fact that it would be much to the advantage of these feminine wage earners if they would acquire positions as maids and housekeepers, who are always greatly in demand. The house, and not the factory is the proper sphere of a woman's activity. We also called attention to the fact that many native-born seamstresses cannot obtain housework because they know nothing about running a home.

    It must also be taken into account that the great demand by the Army for uniforms, tents, etc., has made female labor in garment and tent factories indispensable, and that soldiers' wives who have no children are forced to 2do sewing in order to support themselves. And it is the duty of society to see to it that these women, who are doing work necessary for the welfare of the country, receive wages that will enable them to live at least like human beings.

    Many of them cannot make a living, not even the girls and women who work in factories operated by contractors who are partly under government supervision. When, for instance, some philanthropists of Philadelphia investigated the conditions prevailing among the female employes in the arsenal of that city, they reported the following:

    Women and girls who hold cards permitting them to work in the arsenal get $2.16 for making eight pairs of infantry pants, or twenty-seven cents a pair, and they get four dollars for making eight pairs of cavalry pants. However, one woman or girl cannot make eight pairs of either kind of pants in a week. The pay for other work is much less. A woman reported that her pay for making 3a pair of military pants was decreased from ten to four cents; for making a cavalry coat, from $1.25 to ninety cents; and for making a tent, from twenty-five to sixteen cents. She said it was a good day's work to make three tents, and that it was required of her to sew forty-six buttons on each tent, and to make forty-six buttonholes and twenty loopholes, all for sixteen cents.

    Another woman told the investigators that she was employed at making shirts, that she received 12½ cents a shirt, and had to work diligently from early morning to ten o'clock at night in order to earn four dollars a week. Another said that she received seventy-five cents for making a dozen hats, and that her average weekly wage for working from seven o'clock in the morning until eleven o'clock at night was five dollars. Another woman stated that she was more than fifty years old, that her son was in the army, and that she was obliged to work for the support of herself and one child, that she worked at 4the arsenal and received $2.16 for making eight pairs of pants and $2.40 for making sixteen shirts.

    Nearly all the women and girls complained that they were treated roughly and contemptuously by all except a few of the officers of the arsenal. And corruption is found even in such institutions. At least, one of the employes claimed that there is better-paid work available, but that the clerks take this work home and have it done by their mothers, or sisters, or wives, or fiancees, who earn as much as fourteen dollars a week. One of the clerks provides his mother and two sisters with this better-paid work, and a third sister is employed at the arsenal at six dollars a week. And the most revolting thing about this sad affair is that these poor wretches are forced to work under such revolting conditions in a government-controlled institution, and must suffer under the greed and selfishness of officers who should set a good example for others in respect to the wages they pay and their conduct toward their employes.

    5

    The Philadelphia investigators intended to bring the matter to the attention of Congress and to demand that the guilty be punished and that a more humane policy be followed hereafter.

    If any class of workers deserves sympathy and support in its endeavors to obtain an increase in wages, it is the seamstresses. In an earlier article, we described the sad ...

    German
    I H, I K, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 26, 1864
    Meeting of the Coty Council

    A regular meeting of the City Council was held last night. The mayor and the following aldermen were present: Hahn, Schall, Shimp, Roberts, Barrett, Gallup, Kann, Sheridan, Walsh, McDonald, Comisky, Ulbrich, Clark, Himrod, Holden, Von Hollen, Bond, Garfield, Castleman, Armstrong, Ruh, Hottinger, Sullivan, Shufeldt, and Woodman.

    A regular meeting of the City Council was held last night. The mayor and the following aldermen were present: Hahn, Schall, Shimp, Roberts, Barrett, Gallup, Kann, Sheridan, Walsh, McDonald, Comisky, ...

    German
    I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 30, 1864
    Officers of the Militia Meet

    Yesterday afternoon, the officers of the militia met at the old Klinger Saloon on La Salle Street. The meeting was attended by Messrs. Peter Shimp, Pflaum, Nelson, Ries, Hausmann, and Lochbieler. In the absence of Colonel Knobelsdorff, Mr. Peter Shimp was elected chairman.

    It was decided to establish ten companies independent of all existing organizations, to permit each company to elect its own officers once it had reached full strength, and to elect staff officers in the manner followed by volunteer regiments. It was also voted to pay the recruiting expenses incurred by the officers appointed to do the necessary recruiting, and that each company be allowed three paid recruiting officers.

    It was further decided that the Committe shall be authorized to grant anybody permission to organize a company. [Translator's note: This Committee is not further identified.] Finally it was decided to publish the proceedings of this 2meeting in the Telegraph and in the Illinois Staats-Zeitung.

    The following men offered to serve as recruiting officers: Company A, J. Hausmann; Company B, Captain Pflaum; Company C, Captain Albert; Company D, Captain Lochbieler; Company E, Captain Cronfloe; Company F, Lieutenant Ries; Company G Captain Westerberg; Company H, J. W. Doehler; Company J, Lieutenant Kafka; Company K, Captain Barcal.

    The meeting was then adjourned. Then Colonel Knobelsdorff appeared, protested against the procedure of the assembly, and attempted to hold another meeting. However, those present left without paying the least attention to him. [Translator's note: Colonel Knobelsdorff having been relieved of his command "for cause," he was persona non grata among the Germans of Chicago.]

    Yesterday afternoon, the officers of the militia met at the old Klinger Saloon on La Salle Street. The meeting was attended by Messrs. Peter Shimp, Pflaum, Nelson, Ries, Hausmann, and ...

    German
    III D, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 04, 1864
    General Rosenkranz' Order against Strikes (Editorial)

    Since a condition of war still exists in Missouri, General Rosenkranz has issued the following order: "Everybody is forbidden, directly or indirectly to intimidate, or to hinder from the performance of his duty, any workman who is employed in a Saint Louis factory or shop where articles for use on ships plying Western waters, or in the service of the military, marine, or transport-divisions of the United States. Other workers may not enter such establishments for the purpose of finding out who works in them. Organization, maintenance, and attendance upon meetings, of associations or combines that propose to dictate to the owners of such establishments who shall, and who shall not, work therein, is also prohibited." Thus if necessary, men who work in the aforesaid factories or shops are granted military protection. The proprietors of these places of business are ordered to 2report the names of all those "who have left their work since March 15, 1864 for the purpose of joining such an association or combine, or who have been induced to leave their work through the activity of such an association or combine, or through the efforts of individuals affiliated with such associations or combines." The commanding office is charged with the enforcement of this order, and the city authorities, as well as all loyal citizens, are asked to co-operate.

    We condemn this order, because we consider it both unjust and unnecessary. It is true, of course, that the introduction to the order indicates that the military authorities do not wish to include within the scope of the order the wage question or strikes for the purpose of obtaining more pay, and that these authorities are apparently concerned solely with interference by workers with the operation of the aforementioned businesses. It is also true, of course, that the order pertains to those branches of business that manufacture goods necessary to carry on the war. However, we should like to ask, How many 3factories and shops are not included in this category? Tailors, manufacturers of boots and shoes, machinists, saddlers, blacksmiths, wagonmakers, steelworkers--in short, men in nearly all the principal occupations and trades in Saint Louis are doing work for the Army or Navy. And, no doubt, the order goes far beyond its original object, for it directly deprives workers of their right to join an association, but does not take this right away from manufacturers or dealers. Furthermore, the order imposes a system of military supervision upon workers. It greatly exceeds the limits set by the New York Antistrike Bill, which was withdrawn when the workers who would have been adversely affected by it protested against its passage. The encroachment upon personal freedom and the systematic secret persecution which the order involves are not justifiable under any circumstances.

    And, besides, the order will not attain its purpose, which is to prevent interruption in work that is being done for the Army or Navy. Yes, we venture to say that it will have just the opposite effect; for many workers in Saint Louis will go to other cities where there is also a shortage of labor and 4where higher wages are paid, or where the workers are not hindered by the military or municipal authorities from endeavoring to obtain more pay.

    Let us hope that Colonel Knobelsdorff, who is so sensible and humane in other respects, will have withdrawn his order by this time.

    Since a condition of war still exists in Missouri, General Rosenkranz has issued the following order: "Everybody is forbidden, directly or indirectly to intimidate, or to hinder from the performance ...

    German
    I D 2 a 4, I G, I D 2 a 3, I D 2 a 2