The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 13, 1863
    German Citizens of Chicago Hold Emancipation Meeting

    An emancipation meeting was called to order by Mr. Miller at 8 o'clock, after the Chicago Arbeiterverein Chorus, led by the Great Western Band, had arrived, having displayed in a parade a large banner inscribed "Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863.

    On recommendation of Mr. Miller, Mr. Brown was elected chairman, and he explained the purpose of the meeting in a brief but excellent address.

    Thereupon Mr. Caspar Butz ascended the speaker's platform and said:

    "I believed that the time of mass meetings had passed; but I was mistaken. The news of emancipation has been published and the Emancipation Act went into effect on January 1, 1863, and the fact that so many of my German friends have assembled here is evidence that this measure of the President has found 2great favor with them.

    "Our people have commendable characteristics. In this War they have shown an endurance and a courage which are unique in the annals of man.

    "It has been said that emancipation will cause Negroes to flock to the North, but that assumption is wrong; on the contrary, it is just emancipation that will keep Negroes in the South. Repeal emancipation, and the Negroes will soon be knocking at your door.

    "I would like to say to the gentlemen who are trying to sow the seed of discord among us Northerners: 'Take care, the people have cast their eyes upon you and will know how and where to find you.'

    "What do they want? Peace? A nation which has more than eight hundred thousand men under arms can make peace only on the field of battle. [Translator's note: Verbatim. It is not clear from the connection, who "they" refers to.]

    3

    "But, I tell you, that these traitors will soon lose courage, when they realize that the people, the workers among the people, will find ways and means of protecting their own interests. It is our duty to be on our guard and to watch, so that the advantages which our brave German soldiers have gained by shedding their blood on the battlefield are not lost."

    The assembly loudly and generously applauded the speaker. While the band played a patriotic selection, the banner which the Arbeiterverein brought was hoisted and gave rise to much cheering. The ensign was inscribed with the words: "In union there is strength."

    Mr. Butz then read the following resolutions which were unanimously adopted by the assembly:

    "Whereas, In a time of great danger for the country, when the bloodiest war the world has ever known is being waged by civilization against barbarians, and when the fate of our beloved fatherland is being decided, it is the duty of every 4true patriot to lift up his voice in behalf of the bleeding country; be it therefore

    "Resolved, That we have not yet lost faith in those principles which once called this Republic into being, and that we will always esteem them very highly, since the best blood of the country now copiously flows for the protection of these principles--the eternal principles of liberty, equality, and justice. Be it further

    "Resolved, That we are firmly convinced that, as far as we are concerned, this War is a war for the preservation of our constitutional freedom, and of the blessings accruing from such freedom, and that, to use the words of a prominent man, 'when the bloody despotism of the slaveholder challenges us, crying: "The worker shall be a slave," we, the free citizens of the North, answer: defiantly "The worker shall be a free man!"' Be it further

    "Resolved, That while we deplore the mistakes which the Administration has made, 5and the evident lack of knowledge of the principles of effective warfare, and the corruption prevalent among so many officials, we consider the Emancipation Proclamation to be a herald of better days, marking January 1,1863 as one of the most memorable days in the history of America, as the beginning of a new era of freedom. Be it further

    "Resolved, That we ask the President to abide by the decision which he has made, since retrogression at this time would result in the destruction of the most magnificent temple that was ever built on earth--the temple of freedom; and that we also ask him either to force his present counselors on constitutional matters to aid him in carrying out his policy, or replace them with men who understand the trend of the times. Be it further

    "Resolved, That the nation cannot dispense with the services of men like John Fremont or Butler, the able leader who was the first general to teach us how to suppress the Rebellion, and like brave Turchin, and many other patriots who did much for the cause of the Union. Be it further

    6

    "Resolved, That we thank Richard Yates, Governor of Illinois, for his excellent statesmanlike, patriotic, and inspiring message, which, as we are firmly convinced, expresses the true attitude of the great majority of the people of the United States. Be it further

    "Resolved, That we warn those senators and representatives in Springfield who contemplate treason but have not the courage to execute their infamous schemes, to watch their step, since the people of this state are on the alert and will not tolerate treason to run rampant in Illinois as it did in Missouri. Be it further

    "Resolved, That the infamous parts contained in the Constitution of the state of Illinois, the so-called 'black laws,' are a disgrace to a free state, and inconsistent with the recently issued glorious decree of freedom, and that we hope that the day will soon come when the people themselves will delete the obnoxious statutes from our legal code. Be it further

    "Resolved, That the chairman of this meeting is authorized and requested to 7send a copy of these resolutions to President Abraham Lincoln, to Governor Richard Yates, and to the patriotic members of the Cook County delegation in Springfield, so that the latter may present them to the state legislature."

    The reading of these resolutions fairly electrified the assembly, and there was loud and prolonged cheering when Butler's name was mentioned.

    Thereupon the Chorus of the Arbeiterverein rendered a selection under the leadership of Director Rein.

    Mr. Wilhelm Rapp then spoke to the vast throng. Lack of space and time make it necessary to publish only the more important statements which he made. He said in part:

    "To begin with, I bring you greetings from our esteemed friend Kapp, who was to be the principal speaker this evening, but had to go to St. Louis on very 8important business that could not be postponed. No doubt, he is with us in spirit. And if Willich, the champion of our cause, knew what has happened in this meeting, his heart would leap for joy, despite the fact that he is suffering in captivity. The spirit of Willich also rules in the hearts of other great men of German origin, for instance, in Franz Sigel, who was obliged to remain in Dumfries, like a chained lion, while the battle of Frederickburg was in progress. "Today, my friends, we are celebrating the victory of freedom, the victory which the liberal War party won over our weak Administration. However, I do not believe that the Proclamation will be enforced, as long as such a man as W. H. Steward heads the Cabinet at Washington. Indeed, I am certain, that even we could accomplish much more, if we applied our wonted Teuton energy, though we are inclined to be somewhat rough at times.

    "I do not blame the President, because he does not understand external politics; but now he has called a man from the South who knows very much about the subject; I refer to Benjamin F. Butler. (Loud applause.) He had shown that he does, even before he left New Orleans. He is the man whom I would place at the 9head of the Cabinet. In addition, his appointment to that position is desirable on account of the present status of interior affairs. Mumford was hanged in New Orleans because he trampled upon our national flag. In Chicago, too, there are people who commit similar despicable acts, and heretofore the Government has not had the courage to do more than place them under arrest. That is a poor policy. They should either be set free, or should be made to bear the full punishment for their evil deeds.

    "Last week the Democrats in the state legislature at Springfield even contemplated removing Governor Yates from office and offered the position of Provisional Governor to Mr. Richardson. However, he declined, because he said he was constantly bothered by dreams about ropes. No doubt, this man was thinking about Butler.

    "I do not hold the Democrats responsible for the acts of their leaders. Very likely they (the Democrats) now realize that they have been deceived by the men who head their party.

    10

    "Therefore, it is the duty of our German Democratic friends to leave the party that has trifled with their feelings. They should not obligate themselves in any manner, but be independent, as we are; we are not dependent upon our leaders, and have proved that today, when we criticized and made recommendations to President Abraham Lincoln.

    "This meeting was arranged by the Arbeiterverein. This Society recognizes that this battle is a battle of workers and have so indicated very clearly in the resolutions they made here today."

    The speaker concluded by pointing out that the English proletarians have taken the same viewpoint.

    Thereupon the Arbeiterverein Chorus sang "The Battle Cry of Freedom".

    Mr. [A. C.] Hesing was now asked to address the assembly, but he declined the honor, recommending that Dr. Schmidt be called upon.

    11

    Dr. Schmidt took the speakers stand and made a brief address. He said, "I am greatly moved today by the memory of the fact that December 2, 1859, a small group of men met in Kinzie Hall, to mourn the death of a man who was unquestionably the first champion of the present great movement for liberty, equality, and justice, and who became a martyr to the ideals of freedom. John Brown undoubtedly was the herald of the great change which is now being effected in the nation."

    Dr. Schmidt spoke in glowing terms of the blessed results of emancipation and concluded his address amid loud cheers.

    He was followed by Mr. C. H. Hawley, who spoke in English.

    Adjournment took place after the Arbeiterverein Chorus rendered another selection.

    The Hall was so crowded that many persons found only standing room, and fully 12one sixth of the assembly consisted of ladies.

    Thus ended the largest meeting ever held by Germans in Chicago, the emancipation meeting of the Chicago Arbeiterverein.

    An emancipation meeting was called to order by Mr. Miller at 8 o'clock, after the Chicago Arbeiterverein Chorus, led by the Great Western Band, had arrived, having displayed in a ...

    German
    III B 2, IV, I C, I G, I E, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 01, 1863
    Yesterday's Meeting of German Ladies (Editorial)

    In accordance with appeals which appeared in the Illinois Staats-Zeitung yesterday and the day before, a large number of German ladies met in Bryan's Hall, yesterday at 3 o'clock.

    Mr. Caspar Butz opened the meeting by reading the appeal and making pertinent remarks. The ladies organized by electing Mrs. Elsie Schneider chairman, and Miss Emilie Brentano secretary.

    On recommendation of Mrs. Julie Butz it was decided to give a fair and a ball for the benefit of sick or wounded German Union soldiers.

    Thereupon various committees were elected, one of them for the purpose of interviewing Mr. Bryan relative to the free use of Bryan's Hall, another to 2urge ladies to make various handwork for sale at the fair, and another to solicit donations of articles (or cash) for the fair from businessmen.

    Next Wednesday another meeting will be held, and the time and place of the fair and the ball will be decided according to the reports of the committees.

    We need not impress upon those ladies who were prevented from attending yesterday's meeting that it is very desirable that they, too, participate in this charity which must be dear to the heart of every German woman, and especially that they support the fair by either making or purchasing suitable articles for donation.

    The German ladies having set such a fine example of loving solicitude, the German men will feel compelled to do their part in this matter. How very insignificant are the sacrifices which are asked of us, when compared with those which our brothers daily make on the battlefield for the preservation of the Union and of liberty!

    3

    We need not explain how necessary it is to support our sick or wounded soldiers. Though medical care and hospitalization for our brave fighters have been improved, there is still much to be done to make adequate the care which these unfortunate men deserve. Then too, it must be remembered that every gift and effort of love makes a good moral impression upon those soldiers who are suffering in camps or hospitals. many a soldier here on furlough has told us that such gifts, such proof of sympathy shown by fellow citizens at home have instilled in disabled fighters new courage and new desire to live, even when they were tortured by the most intense pain; and thus our gifts contribute not a little to their recuperation.

    Thus far we have met but very few Germans whose minds have been poisoned by the whispering of traitors. So few will fail to heed the earnest request which our loyal and zealous ladies have made.

    In accordance with appeals which appeared in the Illinois Staats-Zeitung yesterday and the day before, a large number of German ladies met in Bryan's Hall, yesterday at 3 o'clock. Mr. ...

    German
    II D 10, IV, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 27, 1863
    The Correspondence of Some Patriotic German Ladies of Chicago [The following letter, dated February 21, 1863, was written to Mr. Adolf Cluss, Washington, D. C.]

    Dear Sir: I take great pleasure in sending to you, in the name and at the request of the local German Ladies' Aid Society for the Support of Sick and Wounded Union Soldiers, the enclosed draft for five hundred dollars drawn by Henry Greenbaum on Gilman and Company.

    These patriotic ladies are firmly convinced that you will dispose of this money in a just and suitable manner. They are certain that the articles which are purchased therewith will not be given to hospital doctors, nurses, nor to officers who are well and able to do their duty, but to Union fighters who really are in need, without respect to position, rank or nationality, for the purpose of alleviating their suffering. Although it is the wish of the donors 2that soldiers from Illinois receive preference, this wish is not on absolute condition for the distribution of the articles which are purchased with the money, and you are herewith authorized to act as you see fit.

    Please acknowledge receipt of this letter.

    Respectfully yours,

    Caspar Butz.

    [The following letter, dated February 26, 1863, was written to Mr. Caspar Butz, representative of the German Ladies' Aid Society for the Support of Sick and Wounded Union Soldiers.]

    Dear Sir: I hereby acknowledge the receipt of your letter containing a draft for five hundred dollars which you forwarded for the Ladies' Aid Society for the Support of Sick and Wounded Union Soldiers. We are highly flattered by 3your quick and willing response to our request for help, and are honored by the confidence which you not only expressed in your letter, but also showed by sending us so large an amount of money for use in our work. Our Society is highly respected in all local hospitals, and that respect was won by our tireless and honest efforts in behalf of our unfortunate and brave Union soldiers. Although our membership is entirely German, we enjoy the confidence of many native citizens in all Union and some non-Union states. Thus we are enabled to extend our activity to many needy native soldiers without neglecting our brave German fighters who have been forced into inactivity by sickness or wounds which they incurred while in the service of our dearly beloved country. On the other hand, it is evident that we respect any special instructions or wishes with reference to funds or articles which are intrusted to us for distribution. Thus there are times when we cannot be as liberal as we would like to be toward those whose friends, neighbors, or relatives do not assist us as much as they can or should.

    We assure you that we never give any part of contributions to hospital doctors 4or nurses, and much less to loitering officers. Our work is done solely by our members who visit huts, tents, and infirmaries in search of needy.

    Thanking you for your generous and much appreciated assistance

    I remain very gratefully yours,

    Adolf Cluss, Secretary of German Soldiers'

    Welfare Society.

    Dear Sir: I take great pleasure in sending to you, in the name and at the request of the local German Ladies' Aid Society for the Support of Sick and ...

    German
    II D 10, IV, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 27, 1863
    An Unjust and Unrepublican Feature of the Conscription Law (Editorial)

    When we received the information that the National House of Representatives had passed the Conscription Act, it was too late to make a close study of, and comment on the contents of this law which has now been adopted by both branches of Congress.

    Unexpectedly, the House, which made some changes in the Bill that was passed by the Senate, inserted a provision according to which anyone who is chosen for military service in the manner prescribed by the Act, may furnish an acceptable substitute, or the Secretary of War may supply a suitable substitute for a consideration not exceeding three hundred dollars.

    This section of the Act is absolutely unjust to the poor and to those unfortunate workers who do not earn enough money to save three hundred dollars; it favors 2the "gold barons" who can easily raise the necessary money and thus redeem their "golden youths," while the sons of the poor will be forced to do military service.

    Even one who is in favor of substitution with reference to military service will have to admit that setting a minimum of three hundred dollars is a flagrant violation of the rights and privileges of the substitute himself.

    The entire provision, however, is so much more revolting, since it makes a wide distinction between the wealthy and the poor at a time when our country is threatened by great dangers from within and without; it deprives us of a people's army in which all social classes are equally represented, such as is the case in Switzerland.

    In these times that "try men's souls" the working class has given so many proofs of its sacrificing patriotism that no one can accuse it of dishonest motives if it raises its voice against this unjust measure. It is ready at 3all times to shed its blood for the Union, for liberty, for justice, for the emancipation of slaves, and for free labor; but, at the same time, it demands that the sons of the rich shall not have the privilege of purchasing exemption from the performance of their sacred duty for the price of a few paltry pieces of silver.

    Considering the matter from this viewpoint, we can only advise the workers of our country to protest against said provision of the Conscription Act, and to demand that the objectionable section be stricken from the law.

    It has been reported that the Chicago Arbeiterverein contemplates holding a demonstration this week against the aforementioned part of the Conscription Act; a demonstration--note, you Secessionists!--not against the Conscription Act, but in favor of the Conscription Act; however, in favor of an Act from which the faulty paragraph has been deleted.

    The protest of the Chicago Arbeiterverein should be sent to our representatives in Congress before March 4, since Congress will adjourn on that day.

    When we received the information that the National House of Representatives had passed the Conscription Act, it was too late to make a close study of, and comment on the ...

    German
    I G, I H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 09, 1863
    The Care of Partly Disabled Soldiers (Editorial)

    Dr. Wagner, physician of the Twenty-fourth Illinois Regiment, sent us a letter in which he describes the impression which the activity of patriotic ladies of Chicago made upon our soldiers. He writes:

    "The report about the splendid success of the fair which Chicago ladies held for the benefit of sick and wounded Union soldiers made a profound and lasting impression upon our fighters; they note that people at home have a heart, that they think of those who have gone forth to battlefields to defend the country against the Rebels. In this connection, I wish to direct your attention to a matter which you might discuss in your newspaper. Today I signed the discharge papers of two men who were crippled in the Battle of Perryville, and I wondered just what the future would hold for these brave but unfortunate soldiers. The 2one, formerly an able stonecutter was shot through the left side of the chest, his lung was severely injured, and two of his ribs were broken. The other had been a baker. The bones of his lower left arm had been shattered by bullets, and he had also lost two fingers of his right hand. Neither of these men will ever be able to resume his former occupation, but both of them are willing and physically fit to do some other less strenuous work. Are our fellow citizens, who could not do combat service, not honor-bound to provide suitable work for these men? Perhaps a committee could be appointed to serve as our employment agency for partly disabled soldiers. I would like to have your opinion".

    The subject which Dr. Wagner broaches in this letter is one of great importance. The needs of these patriots who have been crippled in the service of the Republic and are unable to work in their former professions or occupations can be temporarily cared for by private charity; but none of our brave soldiers want to accept charity if they can do some kind of work and thus support themselves and their dependents. We mention the matter so that the public will give it careful 3consideration, and we do not doubt in the least that our citizens will find a way to solve this problem to the satisfaction of our heroic semi-invalids.

    Dr. Wagner, physician of the Twenty-fourth Illinois Regiment, sent us a letter in which he describes the impression which the activity of patriotic ladies of Chicago made upon our soldiers. ...

    German
    II D 10, I G, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 16, 1863
    Friedrich Hecker on Promotion (Editorial)

    Many prominent citizens of Missouri and Illinois recently addressed a petition to President Abraham Lincoln, requesting that he appoint Colonel [Friedrich] Hecker, Brigadier General. As soon as he received word of the petition, Hecker, who is confined to his bed in Philadelphia by sickness, wrote to Senator Trumbull, who had been asked to deliver the petition to the President. The following is an excerpt from the letter:

    "I most earnestly beg you not to hand the petition to the President. I do not want any promotion unless I have proved by my military activities that I have earned it, and I certainly will not accept an advancement that is acquired through political favoritism. I most heartily despise anyone who accepts any higher office that he does not merit".

    2

    That is just like Hecker. His attitude is all the more noble since the most competent judges have testified that he possesses in a high degree every requisite of an able general, and that his is the best trained and disciplined regiment in the Potomac Army and that, under Hecker's leadership, it fought well for the cause of the Republic.

    We take pleasure in announcing that according to the latest reports Colonel Hecker is well on the way to recovery from his illness, and it is very probable that he will return to his Regiment in a few days.

    Many prominent citizens of Missouri and Illinois recently addressed a petition to President Abraham Lincoln, requesting that he appoint Colonel [Friedrich] Hecker, Brigadier General. As soon as he received word ...

    German
    III D, IV, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 16, 1863
    Ladies' Aid for the Support of Sick and Wounded Union Soldiers

    A report from the Ladies' Aid Society dated March 13, 1863, and signed by Mrs. Julie Butz, treasurer, stated that Mrs. Louise Degenhardt and Mrs. Elise Schneider left for Memphis, Tennessee Thursday, March 12, to distribute the articles which the Ladies' Aid had purchased for sick and wounded soldiers.

    Mrs. Degenhardt and Mrs. Schneider will confer with America's Florence Nightingale, noble Mrs. Harvey, widow of the late Governor of Wisconsin, and it will depend upon her advice whether or not the Chicagoans will go to Nashville. The report of the ladies will be published later.

    Following is a list of articles which have been shipped to Memphis at the expense of the Chicago Sanitary Commission and will be distributed:

    Value
    21 bushels onions $53.70
    2
    587 pounds dried apples $38.16
    264 pounds dried pears 47.52
    6 barrels cabbage 17.20
    150 pairs woolen socks 48.00
    96 pounds solidified milk 33.60
    220 pounds plums 30.00
    220 pounds barley 15.40
    138 pounds sage 11.04
    200 pounds codfish 11.00
    3
    1 barrel Norwegian herring $12.00
    60 gallons Bourbon whisky 50.00
    36 bottles brandy 30.00
    50 dozens lemons 13.50
    78 bushels potatoes 78.00
    1168 pounds crackers 36.29
    488 pounds rice 43.92
    171 pounds sugar 29.07
    1 barrel sauerkraut 12.00
    4
    1 barrel pickles $9.00
    316 pounds butter 79.12
    28 pounds Java coffee 10.39
    18 pounds tea 20.25
    194 pounds farina 14.83
    Total $748.59

    The above articles were purchased on advice of Judge Skinner, president of the Sanitary Commission, who has considerable experience in such matters. The remainder of the money which was contributed will be used for the benefit of sick and wounded soldiers who are now at home (in Chicago), after the expenses 5of Mrs. Degenhardt and Mrs. Schneider have been deducted. The Illinois Central Railroad gave them free passage to Cairo and back to Chicago. (Telegraph and Union, please copy.)

    A report from the Ladies' Aid Society dated March 13, 1863, and signed by Mrs. Julie Butz, treasurer, stated that Mrs. Louise Degenhardt and Mrs. Elise Schneider left for Memphis, ...

    German
    II D 10, I G, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 29, 1863
    Special Session of City Council

    Alderman Woodman presented an order for four hundred dollars in favor of Charles S. Perry for special services rendered as health officer during the past eight months. The order was unanimously approved.

    On recommendation of Alderman Comisky the Council reviewed the report on the election held April 21, 1863. It appeared that the following persons were elected to office.....

    [Translator's note: The next paragraph of this article contains a detailed report on the election. In the next paragraph a summary report is given, and I shall select from it the names of Americans of German descent.]

    Friedrich Mehring, Collector, for two years; John Schank, Assistant Engineer of the Fire Department, for two years; Constantin Kann, Alderman of the Fifth 2Ward, for two years; George Himrod, Alderman of the Tenth Ward, for two years; Christ Cusselmann, Alderman of the Twelfth Ward, for one year; David Aleckner, Alderman of the Thirteenth Ward, for one year; George von Hollen, Alderman of the Eleventh Ward, for two years; Valentin Ruh, Alderman of the Fourteenth Ward, for two years; Anton Hottinger, Alderman of the Fourteenth Ward, for one year; Henry Gymer, Constable of the Second Ward, for one year; M. Flemming, Constable of the Sixth Ward, for one year; Louis Herbst, Constable of the Twelfth Ward, for one year; John Hettinger, Constable of the Fourteenth Ward, for one year.

    Adjournment followed

    A. J. Marble, Clerk.

    Alderman Woodman presented an order for four hundred dollars in favor of Charles S. Perry for special services rendered as health officer during the past eight months. The order was ...

    German
    I F 5, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 29, 1863
    Realty News

    A large crew of laborers is at present engaged in tearing down a number of old buildings on the west side of North Clark Street, between Kinzie and North Water Streets, to make room for a large brick building, which will be erected by Mr. Charles Ulich, and which will extend from North Water Street to Kinzie Street. The first story will contain a number of stores, which have already been rented at a very high rental. The second story will be arranged for offices, and the third story, which will measure 25 feet in height, will be divided into two spacious halls. The larger one will be used as a dance hall, and the smaller will serve as a meeting place for the Masonic Order. The cost of the structure is estimated at $100,000.

    A large crew of laborers is at present engaged in tearing down a number of old buildings on the west side of North Clark Street, between Kinzie and North Water ...

    German
    II F, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 05, 1863
    The German Society

    The general meeting of the German Society of Chicago was held in the German House, May 3, 1863, with President Heinrich Greenbaum presiding.

    The report of Agent Schlund was read and adopted, and the matter relating to the Reform School was referred to a committee which will endeavor to persuade the executive board of the Reform School to act in line with Mr. Schlund's suggestion.

    The financial report was adopted as read. Election of officers took place with the following result: president, Heinrich Gindele; treasurer, Karl Vergho; secretary, Conrad C. Diehl. Butz and Schneider were appointed to inform the above of their election. The following rules were adopted:

    1) The newly elected officers may not refuse to serve.

    2

    2) Minimum membership fee shall be two dollars. [Translator's note: The secretary does not state whether this sum is the annual or monthly fee.]

    3) Anyone who pays fifty cents or more shall be permitted to speak and vote in the general meetings for the period of one year.

    4) The salary of the agent shall be three hundred dollars per year.

    Heinrich Greenbaum, President.

    Report of the Agent of the German Society of Chicago for April and May, 1862

    April May
    Secured employment for 93 85
    Secured railroad passes for poor 3 1
    Secured railroad passes for wounded soldiers 3 1
    Found baggage for 11 2
    3
    April May
    Located relatives for 5 3
    Families allotted food 7 5
    Assisted in financial matters 8 6
    Found lodgings for families 6 2
    Secured medical aid and medicines for 7 5
    Soldiers' families supported 6 6
    Assisted immigrants to proceed on their journey 4 1
    Corresponded for 120 98
    Referred to county for aid 5 2
    Total 281 219
    Total for April and May 500

    My activity as agent of the German Society of Chicago was interrupted by the President's call for the organization of volunteer state militia. In my spare time I have devoted myself to helping needy immigrants and 4countrymen without remuneration from the Society, until the Conscription Act was passed; but now my term of service has expired.

    The German public of Chicago, a city where fifty thousand Teutons live, should pay more attention to immigration which is the cause of the great and rapid development of the city.

    While Americans annually spend large sums of money for benevolent purposes, as for instance, for orphan homes, homes for the friendless, and homes for the aged, the German Society of Chicago, which has become a refuge for helpless immigrants and needy German citizens, ought not fall asleep; for the German Society of Chicago is the only German organization which aids needy Germans without respect to origin or creed

    If our German citizens would cease helping every beggar and bum who comes to their door or approaches them in the streets, especially in the winter, and would donate corn, flour, meat, potatoes, etc., no Chicago family 5that is worthy of support would have to go hungry.

    The German Society has done much to increase the school attendance of poor children by exercising a "moral" compulsion--by giving shoes and clothing to those poor pupils who attend school regularly.

    We take great pleasure in commending the work done in the Juvenile Home, where German children were always heartily welcomed and well cared for.

    The Home of the Friendless is maintained for the benefit of children of dissolute or criminally inclined parents, or children who are in danger of entering upon a life of crime, and it has proved to be very effective. However the Home of the Friendless is not a suitable place for the children of poor but law-abiding parents; these children should be placed in more pleasant and less dangerous surroundings, so that they are not estranged from their parents and do not fall prey to greedy employers.

    6

    The Home for Workers is in its infancy. It is the most pleasant and most necessary of all branches of charity; for who is more deserving among the needy than the man or woman who is diligent and faithful and would like to work but is prevented from doing so by age and physical disability, and would rather starve than become an inmate of a poorhouse?

    In the Reform School there are proportionately few German boys; and the majority of them have been placed there because of youthful carelessness or indifference on the part of their parents, who either send their boys out to gather old iron and other junk, or permit them to loiter idly about the streets and alleys. In time the lads meet bad companions and finally are confined to reform schools, where they come into contact with confirmed and hardened offenders, and as a result the boys are totally demoralized.

    I hope that the German Society of Chicago endeavors to have juvenile delinquents classified, so that light offenders, first offenders, or those who do not participate in evil deeds, but just accompany the offenders, are not 7placed on the same level with, treated as, and confined with, real criminals, thieves, robbers, murderers, etc., but are kept separate from the latter.

    The inmates of the Reform School should be classified in the following manner: 1) Non-participating observer; 2) Seduced; 3) Corrigible; 4) Incorrigible.

    As in Germany, the societies "for the protection of German emigrants" are expanding their activity, so we also should take greater precautions to protect immigrants in our country.

    In conclusion I wish to emphasize that if the German Society of Chicago is not more alert, the thieves and confidence men in New York and other ports will have a gay time; for the German Society of Chicago and the St. Louis Immigrant Society have done more to prevent swindling than any other organization in the United States. The German Society of Chicago may justly be proud of the fact that it has exposed several attempts to defraud innocent people of large sums of money and valuable property, and has also succeeded 8in locating much valuable baggage.

    If the German immigrants who come to Chicago are left without a source of information or material aid, the city will not only lose its wide-spread reputation for the assistance rendered immigrants, but also will soon be deprived of the valuable services of these people.

    The Chicago Turnverein and the Chicago Arbeiterverein have done much for charitable purposes; however, the great majority of the members of these organizations are of the laboring class; many of them are members of the German Society of Chicago, and their zeal is commendable. Yet it is desirable that those who have wealth--home owners, businessmen, and professional men--take a greater and more active interest in benevolence. And they really are obligated, for they avail themselves of the services of the Society when they need help in their offices, stores, or homes.

    I wish to thank our president, Mr. Heinrich Greenbaum for the valuable 9aid he has given me in my work. He was always willing to assist me whenever difficulties presented themselves, though at times it was necessary that he neglect his business in order to comply with my request.

    I have always tried to be just toward everybody; if I appeared to be unsympathetic in some instances it was only because I wished to discourage people who are not worthy of assistance. There are a great number of beggars who journey from city to city; they are very successful in arousing the sympathy of the public, much more so than worthy applicants for aid. They manage to lead the existence which appeals to them by carefully avoiding any flagrant offense against the laws pertaining to vagrancy. When I refuse to feed or house these lazy persons, they slander the German Society of Chicago. And the public, not knowing that these professional beggars have been driven from some neighboring city by the civil authorities, believes their stories about about inhuman treatment.

    .......[The next paragraph of this article contains a repetition of previously 10expressed thoughts.]

    Respectfully,

    F. Schlund, Agent.

    ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT

    Receipts for 1862 and 1863 $652.07
    Disbursements for 1862 and 1863 246.50
    Balance $405.57

    Heinrich Greenbaum, President.

    May 2, 1863.

    The general meeting of the German Society of Chicago was held in the German House, May 3, 1863, with President Heinrich Greenbaum presiding. The report of Agent Schlund was read ...

    German
    III B 2, III G, III D, II E 3, II E 2, II D 3, II D 5, II D 4, II D 7, II D 8, I B 3 b, I D 1 a, II D 10

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