The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 03, 1874
    Great Scandinavian Mass Meeting

    Those Scandinavians who belong to the opposition held a mass meeting yesterday.

    The assembly was called to order by Fritz Frantzen. The following persons were elected:

    President: A. B.Johnson, Vice Presidents: Geo. J. Hoffman, Capt. Ed. G. Lange, John Wickers; Secretary: John M. Arrvedson.

    We appointed on the committee of resolutions: Jacob Nielsen, Wm. Peterson, Capt. Bergquist.

    After General Lies had finished his speech, the committee on resolutions gave out the following report:

    As the present corrupt condition of our national politics requires the undivided attention of each good citizen, and as the Republican Party no longer defends 2the principles upon which it was founded, but has opened its doors to corruption, like other parties too long in power, and as the leaders of this party are unable to govern and have proven themselves unworthy of the confidence of the people, and since, to our way of thinking, a complete change of our national policy is imperative, as we are convinced, that the Scandinavian press does not express the views of the majority of the Scandinavian people: Be it resolved that the American citizens of Scandinavian descent approve completely the platform accepted by the opposition party on September 26:

    And be it further resolved that we oblige ourselves to work for the success of the opposition party at the next elections.

    After some further discussions the meeting was adjourned.

    Those Scandinavians who belong to the opposition held a mass meeting yesterday. The assembly was called to order by Fritz Frantzen. The following persons were elected: President: A. B.Johnson, Vice ...

    Swedish
    I F 3, I F 3, I F 3, I C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- March 20, 1878
    The Swedish Nationality in America.

    Editor J.A.Enander gave a lecture last Wednesday in the Immanuel Church. His topic was: "The Swedish Nationality in America." Mr. Enander's lecture was very interesting. He predicted that the Swedish nationality in the United States was going to have a great influence upon the future life and progress of America. "The main thing for us Swedes," he said, "is not only to preserve and defend the manly Nordic character we have inherited from our forefathers, but also to adopt all the good we will find among our American brethren."

    Forty million inhabitants in this country are attentively observing us, watching us and the work we are doing for the good of this canny nation. Our duties are great and we have a responsibility both as citizens and as church members.

    Editor J.A.Enander gave a lecture last Wednesday in the Immanuel Church. His topic was: "The Swedish Nationality in America." Mr. Enander's lecture was very interesting. He predicted that the Swedish ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 g, I C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- April 25, 1883
    The Scandinavians Win Praise (Editorial)

    The editorial of the Swedish Tribunen of April 18th in regard to the number of Swedes in the United States has won the attention of many American and German newspapers in Chicago. Not one of them are in doubt as to about our calculation at the number of the Swedish-Americans is at least twice as large as the census shows.

    The Chicago Times has an editorial on the matter and says that the census always has been unreliable, but the office of the census ought to know, say the Times, that the work of the census-taking cost the country a lot of money, and continues:

    "The Scandinavians to not force themselves to secure favors. They are tolerant and broadminded. They come here not only to stay but also to adapt themselves to our customs, to speak our language, and to love our institutions.

    2

    They have never requested that their language be introduced in the public schools. A large number of the Scandinavians attend the evenin school to learn to speak English. English services are conducted every Sunday in most of the Scandinavian churches, which language also is used in their Sunday schools. The Swedes, Norwegians and Danes are satisfied with this country and make America their country. The consequences are that we do not hear so much of Swedish-Americans as we do of other nationalities. It is possible that many Scandinavians forget to declare that they were born on the other side of the ocean and, because they spoke such very good English when they answered questions, put up to them, the census-takers took it for granted they were native Americans."

    The editorial of the Swedish Tribunen of April 18th in regard to the number of Swedes in the United States has won the attention of many American and German newspapers ...

    Swedish
    I C, III G
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 13, 1883
    The Swedish-American in Sweden.

    Editorial: The other day we met a countryman who had been visiting Sweden after an absence of some twelve years from his old country. He had made good in the United States to which country he has now returned. We asked him how he liked Sweden. "Well, he said,""I cannot understand why the home folks show such distrust to us Swedish-Americans." Why is it that we Swedish-Americans lost the favor of our people at home? They ought to know that ninety per cent of the Swedish immigration belongs to the honest worker and farmer class. They also ought to know that the life in America has an ennobling influence on the stranger. A few tolerant and broadminded Swedes admit that many a tough person, before he emigrated has come back home a real gentleman. And so it is. We dare say also that the Americanized Swede after some ten to fifteen years of living here stands a head higher than some of the people of the class he used to belong at home. Maybe he doesn't practice such excessive etiquette here as he did in his old country, but he shows both 2the dignity and station he has attained through the school of life in his new country.

    Some of our Swedish newspapers tell us that many Swedish people do not like to be plain workers, but love to be employed in the government or in the City Hall. Maybe that is one of the reasons why a Swedish-American, who has worked himself into a good position in one way or another, is not so very well received at home? But he knows he is a free citizen in the land of free work. He, who despises the work despises also the worker.

    Editorial: The other day we met a countryman who had been visiting Sweden after an absence of some twelve years from his old country. He had made good in the ...

    Swedish
    III H, I C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 02, 1884
    Swedish Progress in America

    Editorial: At the end of a year and the beginning of a new year one likes to know what the nation has accomplished during the past year. Have we gone backward or forward? And what has taken place among us Swedish-Americans in this respect?

    It would be interesting to know how they try to make their living now compared, lets us say, to twenty years ago.

    If we believe the newspapers in Sweden in regard to the Swedes in America, and their work, there is nothing pleasant to talk about at all but, fortunately, these papers are not hostile to the Swedish-Americans, or no authority on these matters. They look at us through their prejudiced glasses, but that doesn't matter. We know that we are all right, that we have nothing to regret but much to be thankful for.

    2

    Let us go back to 1863, twenty years, since that time of hard work, sacrifice and suffering!. Every year in spite of hardships has been a year of victory. It has been a slow but steadfast walk from poverty to prosperity.

    The Swedish pioneers consisted of poor people almost without any means, who settled themselves on the prairies far away from civilized places. They had to put up a hard struggle to make a living.

    The Nordic strength did not fail, because it was a fight for life or death, where every nerve and muscle were strained.

    If we recall how things looked among the colonists in Illinois, Iowa and Minnesoat twenty years ago, if we had the opportunity to visit them now we would be surprised, and would gladly admit that these pioneers of the West have not lived in vain. They have been faithful to the high mission of sowing the seeds of civilization in places where the Indians and the buffaloes had been

    3

    making their abode. In short, the Swedish-American settlements, which now are spread out in a dozen large states and territories, show pictures of cultivation and prosperity, bearing witness to hard honest work.

    We do not say this to flatter anybody. We present it to show that the fate of the Swedes in this country doesn't call for tears or lamentations, but a glad hymn to Him who leadeth the destines of the people. The same statement can be applied to cities where the Swedes are making their living. It is true that workers, merchants, and the wage earners have to work hard and diligent to keep what they have or to get a stronger foothold,but,generally their lives are running in an undisturbed pattern.

    Sweden ought therefore to be proud of these facts. When they at home are rejoicing that Sweden is growing in peace, that Providence is giving them abundance, they ought not to forget, that the New Sweden on this side of the ocean is growing just as fast in peace and that the same Providence is giving to us, also.

    Editorial: At the end of a year and the beginning of a new year one likes to know what the nation has accomplished during the past year. Have we gone ...

    Swedish
    III H, III G, I C, I L
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 28, 1885
    Swedish and American Education

    Editorial: Herman Annerstedt, captain in the Swedish Navy, has written in his "Memories from America" a sarcastic article in regard to the general educational methods in Sweden as compared with young people's education in America. He says: "We have our own system in Sweden. Every boy in Sweden must have an education, either private or public, and most of them attend the public schools. When the young man is eighteen or nineteen he quits the school and starts life. He approaches life with hat and cane and white collar. He knows the names of the small rivers. He speaks Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, French and English, sometimes Danish and Norwegian, which is a terrible mixup. But who needs them?

    No foreman can put them to work in a factory. No farmer can put a plow in such hands. He intends to serve the government or to continue his studies at the University or at some business college. He tends to these studies very well until he is nearly thirty years of age, and then he starts 2to earn his living. Can all this be right?

    All education in America has but one goal: It is your absolute duty to live, but, to live you must work. The English language dominates the grammar school. One is taught to think, speak, and write his thoughts clearly and straight forwardly. Students usually read American history, and geography. These, together with mathematics is the minimun every American gives his children up to fifteen or sixteen years of age. Then they start their lives. If one has the ambition to continue his studies, there are colleges and universities,of course, and there is plenty of room for every one. But here I speak mainly of the great working class.

    At the age of fifteen a boy has a fair education, is still young and happy and not overworked, as in Sweden, and not "boiled out," as in England. Then he gets his mother's blessing, and $25 or $30 cash from his father and uses five years- and what years to travel around and learn half a dozen trades; for a couple of months he works on a farm in Nebraska, and learns how to produce wheat. Then he starts to work in a shoemaker's shop in Boston, or as a blacksmith in New York for half a year or so. Sometimes we find him as a miner 3in Pennsylvania, and then as a carman for a couple of trips. Two years or so later we find him to be a watchmaker in St.Louis, studying philosophy in his spare time. Or he is in charge of cattle out in the prairies until he is twenty or twenty-one. Then he is a man. He hasn't read as much in books as we in the Old World, but he has experience for good or for bad.

    We conservative Scandinavians should get a lesson from all this here mentioned; viz, to change trades in time if we have made a bad choice; to do anything and everything with a little more speed; to save up for a rainy day. In other words, we should not be ashamed to work, work with our two hands!"

    Editorial: Herman Annerstedt, captain in the Swedish Navy, has written in his "Memories from America" a sarcastic article in regard to the general educational methods in Sweden as compared with ...

    Swedish
    I A 1 a, I C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- August 18, 1888
    The Americans and the Scandinavians

    The Chicago Times devoted almost an entire column last Sunday to the Swedish, Norwegians and Danish people living in Chicago.....

    The paper stated that the Scandinavians are known widely to be an industrious and hardworking people. They learn the English language faster and better than any other nationality and take a lively and intelligent part in politics. Most of them are Republicans but many are going to follow Congressman John Lind of Minnesota and vote the Democratic ticket.

    Among the more prominent Swedes in Chicago is Robert Lindblom, who is a very active man.

    He is a man who likes to "sing out" his opinion in such a sarcastic manner that he is envied among many newspaper men.

    The Chicago Times devoted almost an entire column last Sunday to the Swedish, Norwegians and Danish people living in Chicago..... The paper stated that the Scandinavians are known widely to ...

    Swedish
    I C, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- August 18, 1888
    The Americans and the Scandinavians

    The Chicago Times devoted almost an entire column last Sunday, to the Swedish Norwegian and Danish people living in Chicago, their moral, physical and political standing. These constitute a total population of 60,000 or more. The paper stated that the Scandinavians are known widely to be an industrious and hardworking people. They learn the English language faster and better than any other nationality and take a lively and intelligent part in politics. Most of them are Republicans, but many are going to follow Congressman John Lind of Minnesota and vote the Democratic ticket. Among the more prominent Swedes in Chicago is Robert Lindblom, who is a very active man.

    He is a man who likes to "sing out" his opinion in such a sarcastic manner that he is envied among many newspaper men.

    The Chicago Times devoted almost an entire column last Sunday, to the Swedish Norwegian and Danish people living in Chicago, their moral, physical and political standing. These constitute a total ...

    Swedish
    I C, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- March 02, 1889
    The Work in America and in Sweden

    EDITORIAL: The Swedish Tribune, Chicago, reprinted an article from Goteborg's Handelstidning, Sweden on its editorial page today:

    "When a Swede goes to the United States of America he is surprised to see how much a man does there. The American worker receives higher wages than in Sweden, but he does much more work during fifty-nine hours in the week. He is able to better his position, to get married early, to own his home and his dear garden.

    The shops and the factories are conducted in a different way then in the Old World.

    The European company extends the factory activities when business is increasing, but when times are not so good they cut down everywhere. The European factory owner makes his machines and tools better when forced to 2do so by competition and moves out to the country or to a smaller city where there are no such industries as his factory, if the wages become too high.

    The American has another system, he tries to increase his business as much as possible by using agents, travelling salesman, advertisements, and by forcing his machines and his workers to the limit. He doesn't wait until he is forced to get his machines and tools into better shape. Improvements save time, strength, and money. He makes satisfactory arrangements if the wages are too high.

    The American factories are elastic in regard to the market. Their machines are not making their owners so dependent on their workers as in Europe, where a factory owner sometimes cannot deliver orders at a certain time, because his workers "take some days off."

    It doesn't take a long time to learn how to use the American machines and tools, even for a man who never has used them before. Small factories are, therefore, not afraid to take orders to be delivered on time. And they make it. Many Swedes have accomplished that here in the Middle West, and when the Swedes in 3America have learned accuracy and understand that they will be out of work if they "skip," they are said to be the best workers in the world.

    A factory owner in America would lose his customers if he could not be depended upon to keep his promises... It is, therefore, necessary that he in turn be able to depend upon his employee's accuracy and promptness.

    Take for example, a pair of shoes. More than a hundred different machines have been invented for this industry. Modern shoe factories have organized large communities. The forty-four different parts in a pair of shoes are now made in the large factories of America by fifty men, women and children. The consumer can now buy a pair of shoes forhalf the price they cost ten years ago.

    American shoeworkers are paid by the day. The wage for a fifty-nine hour week is $11.63. Every worker has his own account and is charged with the quantity of leather he receives. If he cannot do a certain amount of work a day, or if he is careless with the leather and uses too much, he is fired.

    4

    It takes very skilful workers to bring a pair of shoes into the proper final form, and they are paid more than the other workers. No machine has yet been invented to do this important work.

    When the Swedish workers in America become familiar with the American working methods they are said to be excellent workers and quickly raise themselves up to the higher wage levels.

    If those in Sweden would adopt these American working methods,they would be much better off. There would be new life in our Swedish factories, and Sweden as a whole would benefit tremendously."

    EDITORIAL: The Swedish Tribune, Chicago, reprinted an article from Goteborg's Handelstidning, Sweden on its editorial page today: "When a Swede goes to the United States of America he is surprised ...

    Swedish
    I C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- August 29, 1889
    The World's Fair of 1893 and the Scandinavian Societies.

    All the Swedish, Norwegian and Danish Societies in Chicago were invited by the Swedish Society Svea to co-operate in order that the three nations might be represented at the World's Fair as worthily as possible.

    Forty Scandinavians met last Monday night at the Sherman House, representing various societies and lodges. By-laws were accepted and officers elected. The purpose of this newly formed society is to gather as much exhibition material together as possible from their native lands, as well as from the Scandinavians here in this country. The members ought also to assist visiting countrymen at the World's Fair.

    All the Swedish, Norwegian and Danish Societies in Chicago were invited by the Swedish Society Svea to co-operate in order that the three nations might be represented at the World's ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 c 3, III H, I C