The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 28, 1885
    Swedish and American Education

    Editorial: Herman Annerstedt, captain in the Swedish Navy, has written in his "Memories from America" a sarcastic article in regard to the general educational methods in Sweden as compared with young people's education in America. He says: "We have our own system in Sweden. Every boy in Sweden must have an education, either private or public, and most of them attend the public schools. When the young man is eighteen or nineteen he quits the school and starts life. He approaches life with hat and cane and white collar. He knows the names of the small rivers. He speaks Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, French and English, sometimes Danish and Norwegian, which is a terrible mixup. But who needs them?

    No foreman can put them to work in a factory. No farmer can put a plow in such hands. He intends to serve the government or to continue his studies at the University or at some business college. He tends to these studies very well until he is nearly thirty years of age, and then he starts 2to earn his living. Can all this be right?

    All education in America has but one goal: It is your absolute duty to live, but, to live you must work. The English language dominates the grammar school. One is taught to think, speak, and write his thoughts clearly and straight forwardly. Students usually read American history, and geography. These, together with mathematics is the minimun every American gives his children up to fifteen or sixteen years of age. Then they start their lives. If one has the ambition to continue his studies, there are colleges and universities,of course, and there is plenty of room for every one. But here I speak mainly of the great working class.

    At the age of fifteen a boy has a fair education, is still young and happy and not overworked, as in Sweden, and not "boiled out," as in England. Then he gets his mother's blessing, and $25 or $30 cash from his father and uses five years- and what years to travel around and learn half a dozen trades; for a couple of months he works on a farm in Nebraska, and learns how to produce wheat. Then he starts to work in a shoemaker's shop in Boston, or as a blacksmith in New York for half a year or so. Sometimes we find him as a miner 3in Pennsylvania, and then as a carman for a couple of trips. Two years or so later we find him to be a watchmaker in St.Louis, studying philosophy in his spare time. Or he is in charge of cattle out in the prairies until he is twenty or twenty-one. Then he is a man. He hasn't read as much in books as we in the Old World, but he has experience for good or for bad.

    We conservative Scandinavians should get a lesson from all this here mentioned; viz, to change trades in time if we have made a bad choice; to do anything and everything with a little more speed; to save up for a rainy day. In other words, we should not be ashamed to work, work with our two hands!"

    Editorial: Herman Annerstedt, captain in the Swedish Navy, has written in his "Memories from America" a sarcastic article in regard to the general educational methods in Sweden as compared with ...

    Swedish
    I A 1 a, I C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 13, 1890
    Swedish Sloyd to Be Introduced at the Chicago Schools

    Dr. Alice Stockman, who just has returned from Sweden, where she has specialized in a thorough study of Swedish Sloyd, and the methods of instructions used over there, delivered a lecture the other day on the subject in question before the Industrial Art Association. Meeting in the Women's Hall of the Art Institute, Dr. Stockman spoke in high terms of the advantages and benefits of a child's education. It broadens the visions, and lays foundations for practical development, she said as she strongly advocated the introduction of the system in the Chicago public schools. A special Sloyd work-table, which she brought with her from Sweden was exhibited and demonstrated. A general discussion ensued and resulted in the adoption of a resolution recommending the introduction of the Sloyd System in two of the public schools, the Normal Park and the Armour. More than 150 men and women attended the lecture and several newcomers were enrolled as members of the Association.

    Dr. Alice Stockman, who just has returned from Sweden, where she has specialized in a thorough study of Swedish Sloyd, and the methods of instructions used over there, delivered a ...

    Swedish
    II A 3 a, IV, I A 1 a, III H
  • Svenska Tribunen -- March 26, 1891
    Swedish Graduate

    Our fellow countryman, P. W. Thorelius, graduated the other day from the Chicago College of Dental Surgery. He received the degree of D.D.S.

    Our fellow countryman, P. W. Thorelius, graduated the other day from the Chicago College of Dental Surgery. He received the degree of D.D.S.

    Swedish
    I A 1 a
  • Svenska Tribunen -- August 17, 1892
    He Believed in Education

    Our countryman August Hoglund passed away last Thursday in his home, 13 Otis St., at an age of nearly 66. He was a tailor by trade and had been a resident of Chicago since 1869. He is survived by his widow, five sons, one daughter and four grand-children.

    All of his children were given a good education. Of the three oldest sons, Charles is a Justice of the Peace here in Chicago, John a Lawyer, also in Chicago, and Frank the City Clerk of Rockford, Ill.

    Our countryman August Hoglund passed away last Thursday in his home, 13 Otis St., at an age of nearly 66. He was a tailor by trade and had been a ...

    Swedish
    IV, I A 1 a, I B 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 25, 1900
    The Swedish Summer Festival.

    p.8.... Under the auspices of "The Swedish National Association," a summer festival was held at Fox River Grove yesterday, which was attended by more than 18,000 people. Mr. O.C.Peterson, President of the association said in his speech, that the Swedish population is being rapidly assimilated. He also stated, that Swedish colleges, unable to compete with American educational institutions, will be forced in a few years to close their Higher Swedish Educational Institutions.

    p.8.... Under the auspices of "The Swedish National Association," a summer festival was held at Fox River Grove yesterday, which was attended by more than 18,000 people. Mr. O.C.Peterson, President ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 c 3, I A 1 a, III B 2, III A, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- March 13, 1901
    Distinguished

    p.11............H. O. Enwall, student in the senior class at Northwestern University won the first prize of fifty dollars in an oratorical contest, held last week. He was also asked to represent the University at the Northern Oratorical League's oratorical contest at Iowa City next May.

    p.11............H. O. Enwall, student in the senior class at Northwestern University won the first prize of fifty dollars in an oratorical contest, held last week. He was also asked to ...

    Swedish
    I A 1 a
  • Svenska Tribunen -- March 20, 1901
    Bertram G. Nelson, Orator

    p.12.... In an oratory contest among the students at the University of Chicago, Bertram G. Nelson of 6141 Wabash Ave.,was the victor. As a reward, he was asked to represent the University at the Northern Oratorical League contest which will be held May 4th in Iowa City.

    p.12.... In an oratory contest among the students at the University of Chicago, Bertram G. Nelson of 6141 Wabash Ave.,was the victor. As a reward, he was asked to represent ...

    Swedish
    I A 1 a
  • Svenska Tribunen -- April 17, 1901
    Chicago Bethany Alumni Association

    p.11...... The Chicago Bethany Alumni Association will hold its yearly reunion Monday evening, April 29, at the Swedish Lutheran Trinity Church in Lake View, on the corner of Noble and Seminary Aves. Dr. Swensson, President of Bethany College, will give a lecture in English on an interesting theme, and the highly esteemed baritone singer, Gustaf Holmquist, will give the audience an opportunity to hear his glorious voice during the evening.

    Likewise there will be solo numbers by the recognized singers, the Misses Lillian Forssee and Ernestine Cotton.

    The Association has more than seventy members, and its present president is Dr. C.L.Lenard; an election of directors will be held after the festival. No admission will be charged.

    p.11...... The Chicago Bethany Alumni Association will hold its yearly reunion Monday evening, April 29, at the Swedish Lutheran Trinity Church in Lake View, on the corner of Noble and ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 c 3, I A 1 a
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 01, 1901
    Bethany College Association

    p.11....The Bethany College Association of Chicago celebrated its third annual Festival last Monday evening, It was held at the Swedish Lutheran Trinity Church in Lake View, before a"full house."

    This was one of it's best Festivals, and, small wonder, when the program included such talent as the soprano singers, the Misses Lillian Forssee and Gertrude Smith, both former teachers at Bethany College; and the celebrated baritone, Mr. Gustaf Holmquist.

    Miss Forssee sang "Summer" by Cecile Chaminade, and Gertrude Smith gave "Villanelle" by Dell Agua. Mr. Holmquist sang "It Is Enough" from Mendelssohn's Elijah, without false praise, it can be said that more glorious baritone voice than his is hard to be found in our great worldncity. Dr. Swensson has made it 2his aim to be present at the annual festival of the Association always. He was there present at this time, too, and gave a talk on child-bearing. Other numbers on the program included an organ-solo by Mr. A.O.T. Astenius and a Reading by Miss Phoebe Roberts, who appeared in place of Miss Glenna Smith.

    After the Festival election of officers was held in the basement of the church. Professor C.J.Wilson of North Park College was elected president; Dr. Arvid Pihlblad of the Augustana Hospital was elected Vice-president; Miss Ester Holmquist; secretary, and medical student G. Ellison, treasurer. As Director-members the following were elected: Mrs. Sophie Young and Messrs. G. Nelson, and P.C.Pearson.

    While refreshments were being served a short talk was given by the retiring president, Dr. C.L.Lenard; also by Professor Wilson, Dr. Swensson, and lawyer C.R.Chindolom.

    Some of the young women honored the Association by preparing a fine "coffee-table". The collection which was taken up for the Bethany College Endowment 3Fund amounted to thirty dollars.

    It is the aim of the Association to celebrate a private Festival next fall.

    p.11....The Bethany College Association of Chicago celebrated its third annual Festival last Monday evening, It was held at the Swedish Lutheran Trinity Church in Lake View, before a"full house." This ...

    Swedish
    I A 1 a, I A 3
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 22, 1901
    "The Learned Way" in America

    p.6.... In the old, well-known, periodical, The Atlantic Monthly, Professor Hugo Minsterberg of Harvard University, German by birth, has published an article on "Creative Learning in America" in which one notes the following:

    "Well do I recall a long conversation which, when I was almost a newcomer in the country, and lacking in experience in the ways of the American academics, I had with an Englishman of learning who had come here to lecture. We talked of the low standpoint of American learning, and he said: America will never have a corps of learned men of the first rank, such as are found in Germany and England, before professors in the leading universities draw a salary of at least $10,000 a year and the best men of learning draw their $25,000.

    I was astonished and called this, his conception, pessimistic and materialstic, but he stood by his words and continued: It is not money, in and for itself, 2which the Americans strive for, but money is to him the measure of success, and, therefore,"the learned way" needs the support of money to make itself respected and influential in the community, so that it may win the best equipped minds.

    My English friend did not succeed in convincing me at that time but since then the years have proved to me that he was right; the years I have spent in contact with hundreds of teachers and other men of learning from everywhere in the whole country; the years,during which I have seen how the most gifted students long wondering just how to follow their bet for knowledge so as to win, at least, a coveted recognition in the community, finally go into law or some business that would yield the desired results.

    Such talk is, of course, not pleasant to hear, but Mr. Munsterberg's views should still be recognized as true, by each and every one who with open eyes have looked at our spiritual, political, and social life, and have noticed 3the motives, which rule there. Money is looked upon, undeniably, as the measure of success. For him who acquires riches, the way lies open to "the community's heights." Certainly, there are people to be found, who, regardless of all their money, are respected by the whole world, and others who, without any great measure of earthly possessions win great honor; but these are only exceptions not the rule.

    One need not be a worshipper of "the almighty dollar," to give the preference, when choosing a profession, to the one which appears to offer the best economic outlook. Even the one who does not thirst after riches wishes, at least to win a good subsistence, better than his parents enjoyed, and to be able to give his children better opportunities than those, which he himself had. The "learned way" at the completion of which stands a professorship with $3,000 or $5,000 a year, demands long years of arduous preparatory work and offers but little of that reward which obtains from public recognition and diplomas of honor.

    It is, then, not at all strange if the best minds prefer other less strenuous and more promising ways.

    4

    In view of this it may well,with reason, be doubted whether it be wise and desirable to continue putting great amounts of money given to the American educational institutions, into costly buildings and costly "inventory." Those schools of learning in the old world which have won world renown and preserved it during the centuries, have won it not through their stately buildings, but through that tribe of men of learning, who were nurtured in them and afterward served as educators. Were it not then, by far wiser to defer for the time being, the building of palatial universities? The money which would be required for the costly buildings could be employed much more profitably if the income from the funds were used for scholarships and for teachers' salaries. This would encourage the most gifted youngsters in following their natural bent, giving their lives to the pursuit of knowledge in the department, in which the individual in question feels himself especially prepared, and in which he might develop new lines of thought.

    p.6.... In the old, well-known, periodical, The Atlantic Monthly, Professor Hugo Minsterberg of Harvard University, German by birth, has published an article on "Creative Learning in America" in which one ...

    Swedish
    I A 1 a, I A 1 d