The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- July 23, 1891
    Spanish-American Club Trouble

    The Spanish-American Club, which during a short existence has become favorably known as accomplishing a valuable but unique work, had a stormy time of it at the Grand Pacific last night. Before it had been long in session the President August E. Gans, left the chair and tendered his resignation, which was promptly and unanimously accepted. Resolutions of censure upon Mr. Gans and the absent Secretary, Leonde Gats Kofsky, for having insulted members in open meeting were laid upon the table in order to give the two officers an opportunity to explain should they so desire. The matters leading to this serious disagreement appear to have been trivial. Mr. Gans is said to have thought the Vice-President B. F. Thomas, assumed too much authority, while Mr. Thomas and Mr. A. M. L. Coleson, one of the clubs enthusiasts thought the President should give them some consideration for having done work for which they allowed him to receive the credit.

    2

    Mr. Gats Kofsky is said to have changed the date of meetings to suit his own convenience and with having insulted various members. After the departure of Mr. Gans last night the club appointed numerous committees to continue the proposed work, and all expressed themselves as convinced that a period of renewed prosperity was assured. Mr. Thomas will fill Mr. Gans' unexpired term.

    The Spanish-American Club, which during a short existence has become favorably known as accomplishing a valuable but unique work, had a stormy time of it at the Grand Pacific last ...

    Spanish
    I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- September 16, 1891
    Chicago's First Spanish Newspaper

    The first Spanish paper in Chicago has made its appearance, with the title of El Eco de Chicago. It is a handsome sixteen page sheet, and is issued under the auspices of the Parisian School, No. 24 Adams street. It is, as its name indicates, an echo of the city, but beyond this it aims to and should have an important influence as an organ of communication between the managers of the World's Fair and the Spanish-American nations. It appears at an opportune time, therefore, and as the only Spanish paper in the city it is likely to have a wide sphere of influence.

    The first Spanish paper in Chicago has made its appearance, with the title of El Eco de Chicago. It is a handsome sixteen page sheet, and is issued under the ...

    Spanish
    II B 2 d 1
  • Chicago Daily News Scrapbook of Robert C. Jones -- October 28, 1927
    Mexican Colony Enlisted in War on Tuberculosis

    Educational campaign is instituted by Municipal Sanitarium. An intensive campaign for the elimination of tuberculosis among the 10,000 Mexicans of Chicago is announced by the Municipal tuberculosis sanitarium. It will take the form of school of public health instruction and will be directed by Dr. Benjamin Goldberg, medical supervisor of the institution. The city now has 642 of the Mexican colony under its supervision for tuberculosis.

    A series of lectures covering basic facts about the white plague, given in Spanish by native Mexicans, and moving-picture films to illustrate various conditions and point out salutory lessons, are to be used", said Dr. Goldberg. Leaflets printed in Spanish will be distributed to the entire Mexican population, so that they will be enabled to understand tuberculosis-breeding conditions and endeavor to remedy them.

    2

    Messages on health also are being printed in the Spanish Language newspapers. Lectures on the prevention of tuberculosis will be given for four Sunday evenings at the University of Chicago Settlement in the head of a large colony of Mexicans working in the Stockyards, and later in the South Chicago Steel-mill district. The first meeting was held last Sunday night at Hull House, attended by 400 Mexicans and addressed by Dr. Goldberg, LeRoy Miller of the Sanitarium board of directors; Rafael Aveleyra, Mexican Consul; and Dr. E. Garvia Trevino.

    Educational campaign is instituted by Municipal Sanitarium. An intensive campaign for the elimination of tuberculosis among the 10,000 Mexicans of Chicago is announced by the Municipal tuberculosis sanitarium. It will ...

    Spanish
    II D 3
  • Mexico -- June 02, 1928
    Funeral Notice from South Chicago.

    The following information was sent to us by our good friend, Jose R. Vega: On May 24, 1928 Refugio Vazquez died at the County Hospital of pneumonia.

    Vazquez, our compatriot arrived a few days ago from Montana, San Luis Potosi, Mexico accompanied by his wife and a brother-in-law. His wife and brother-in-law not only suffered the shock of Vazquez's death but, also the misfortune of being without the necessary resources to fulfill their last obligation of burying the deceased. The situation was so bad that the wife was forced to make an appeal to her friends. A collection was taken up among the Mexican colony in that sector with magnificent results.

    The generosity of the Mexican people was once more demonstrated on this occasion. The amount collected was $94.10. Jose R. Vega and Isidro M. Comparan each donated $20.00. Other donations consisted of five dollars and down to 25 cents.

    The family and friends of the deceased, through this newspaper which is the organ of the Mexican colony,wish to express their gratitude for the kind contributions.

    The following information was sent to us by our good friend, Jose R. Vega: On May 24, 1928 Refugio Vazquez died at the County Hospital of pneumonia. Vazquez, our compatriot ...

    Spanish
    I B 3 c, II D 10
  • Mexico -- June 02, 1928
    "This Is the Way to Do It"! -By our Mexican Band.

    The example has been set, dear friends and illustrious compatriots. This example will be perpetuated forever.

    It proves that there is not an obstacle that can paralize the will power, energies, and virility of men who wish to see crystalized that which at one time was only a dream. You may pardon me for saying, "our band," which made its appearance last Saturday at the Ashland Auditorium, because all that is Mexican belongs to us.

    It is ours simply because it is Mexican and everything that is Mexican is ours. It happened one day when we least expected it. Francisco Calderon,with a group of Mexican musicians presented to us what they had acquired through study, efforts and privations in order to show to the world of what we are capable.

    I have never seen festivals being organized by us in this city in a better way.

    2

    Great was the crowd assembled in the Ashland Auditorium. As soon as we walked into the building, there were two gay chaps perfectly dressed in a blue uniform to direct us. Inside of the hall, we could see and admire the four thousand, three hundred persons properly seated, anxiously awaiting the moment when the curtain would arise and permit them to see the splendid Mexican artists.

    When the performance started maestro Calderon appeared in an impeccable military uniform, with baton in hand. It was a gorgeous sight.

    They played masterfully in spite of being amateurs. Much applause was heard, the auditorium was filled to capacity with good looking women, cultured ladies, handsome gentlemen and in general a very select audience.

    When the baritone Jose Lopez Oseguera appeared on the stage, the audience broke out into a thundering applause, for he is well known in all the artistic centers and has taken part in many of the Mexican festivals in the colony.

    3

    On that night he offered us all he possessed; his art, voice and dynamic personality, all these were concentrated in his performance. His distinguished personality left an immense impression on the people.

    After the concert a splendid dance followed, where we saw the most select of our society. The young and elderly ladies displayed their wardrobes that night.

    It was a "gala night," a Mexican night, and a glorious night for our colony in Chicago including the Mexican Band and its director Francisco Calderon. The Mexican Band of Chicago has set an example and has shown that this is the way to do things. This is the way to show the world what we are able to do. We must set examples with facts, and not with empty words. It is up to us now to follow this example, let us be united, abolish old policies, also organizations of dances which lead to nothing, like the so called "Mutualist Societies," if you please, which in other words are private institutions organizing dances and other entertainment.

    The example has been set, dear friends and illustrious compatriots. This example will be perpetuated forever. It proves that there is not an obstacle that can paralize the will power, ...

    Spanish
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 a
  • Mexico -- September 15, 1928
    S. M. Carmen I and her Court of Honor

    Seven thousand votes were casted in her favor, this is a worthy work of the Mexican colony in South Chicago. To S. M. Carmen I.- Miss Carmen Gallaga, and her Court of Honor, we are pleased to dedicate this page of our special edition. Lamenting only that we are not able to present her picture together with the nine good looking girls who form the Court of Honor of the Patriotic celebration in South Chicago. Probably it is the turn of the South Chicago colony to have the privilege of organizing the Patriotic Festivals.

    We are pleased to say that this noble neighborhood really is entitled to an applause for the work they have been carrying on with so much anticipation. It is well known to the colony of South Chicago the double efforts made of many of the residents of that vicinity in the organization of the program for the 16th of September.

    2

    And it is due in the first place to the colony of South Chicago and secondly to the Caballeros de Guadalupe, (Knights of Guadalupe) whose institution was assigned by the colony to direct the work. One of the most important numbers in the program is the inauguration of the South Chicago Mexican Band whose members are workers of the Illinois Steel Company and other foundries in that region who, for the first time shall present to the colony the fruit of many years of labor. To make a complete history of the South Chicago Band is something that is not in our reach because we have not the complete information, nevertheless, we shall try at least to give you an idea of its beginning. Therefore, we now take the privilege of introducing the contents of a circular that was published at the inception of this organization which reads as follows.

    The organizers of the "Chicago Mexican Band" have the pleasure to invite all the young people who like music and may be interested to take part in the formation of the Band. And thanks the great sympathy of Mr. P. A. Newton, General Superintendent of the Illinois Steel Company, and Mr. T. H. McKeeney, Manager of the same, who have offered us their valuable protection that is to give the members of this Band a preference in employment.

    3

    They have given orders to the employment office to that extent, so, any person interested in the art of music may call at the Academy of Music 8751 Buffalo Avenue, South Chicago. There you may subscribe as a member, obtain all the necessary information and then we will send you to the employment office of the Illinois Steel Company. The academy is open from 9:00 A.M. until 11: P. M. and is located at the above address. South Chicago, Illinois. July 16, 1926. Signed: Gumaro Ortiz Director, Pedro Luna and E. Aragon colaborators.

    This copy of the circular was loaned to us by Mr. Pedro Luna who said that, at the time of its publication it was not taken into consideration that Mr. Luna and Mr. Aragon were the real organizers of the Band. Therefore, this is only an idea of the birth, the rest of its life is lost in the course of time. It is known that the members went through all kinds of experiences in their training with various teachers.

    4

    The time went on and the help offered by the company was neglected some-how, perhaps because of the little or no advancement in the group. Some of the students became demoralized and suspended their studies, and others who did not went to see the dissolution of the band continued the studies.

    Three years ago Professor Cirilo Rodriguez through the friendship of Melesio Espinosa was brought to Gary, Indiana, where another band was being organized and thanks to the skill of Professor Rodriguez, who took the direction of the group,in nine months time the band was inaugurated. The same professor has undertaken the instruction of the Band of South Chicago, and perhaps the small progress that they have accomplished lately is due to his efforts.

    Let this humble note serve to congratulate Professor Rodriguez and his South Chicago Band. Their work deserves praise for their effort, persistence,courage and good-will in trying to conquer the art of music in spite of all the vicissitudes encountered.

    Signed,

    M. E. Mefisco

    Seven thousand votes were casted in her favor, this is a worthy work of the Mexican colony in South Chicago. To S. M. Carmen I.- Miss Carmen Gallaga, and her ...

    Spanish
    II B 1 c 3, II B 2 b, II B 1 a
  • Mexico -- October 10, 1928
    The Victim

    Jose Barcenas and his wife arrived here from Mexico full of dreams.

    Jose, at first, was very proud. His income was equal to his aspirations and he praised the day on which he had decided to come here --- But during prohibition, his wife got the idea of making beer at home which could be secretly sold to Jose's fellow workers.

    Barcenas agreed and in a short while his customers increased and his gains multiplied. But while Jose was making big profits, he became the victim of a bad habit. Barcenas began to drink and soon became a habitual drunkard.

    However, because Barcenas had for many years performed his duties well at the places where he had worked, the managers had much sympathy for him and excused his weakness.

    2

    One morning, some time after the 19th of March, Jose went to work in a half drunken stupor. In celebration of his patron Saint he had gone on one of his customary sprees.

    His superintendent assigned him to watch a steam-shovel where shortly after 1 A.M. he was injured. His fellow- workmen rushed to his help and found that he had broken his back. He was taken to the hospital where he had to remain for several months. The hospital, doctor's bill exhausted all his savings.

    When he returned home from the hospital he found three hungry small children and a distressed wife. Reverses continued to increase. Finally one day Jose, died at the break of day. This ended his dreams which he had hoped to realize in the United States.

    Jose Barcenas and his wife arrived here from Mexico full of dreams. Jose, at first, was very proud. His income was equal to his aspirations and he praised the day ...

    Spanish
    I B 3 c, I B 1
  • Mexico -- October 10, 1928
    Unscrupulous Employment Agencies

    From time to time reports have reached this newspaper about some of our countrymen who have come to this city in search of work and who have become victims of racketeering employment agencies. The system of asking money for a job which is never secured for the applicant is not confined to Chicago neither is it news to us. The question is that the "victim" pays for a job which he may or may not get, the latter case being the more common.

    We recommend that those who might be seeking work through employment agencies, make their choice with the utmost circumspection so as not to become victims of a fraud. The only way to put a stop to these wretched swindles is to stay away from the places where they are practiced. Applicants should pay for employment after they have obtained it.

    2

    We do not wish to say that this shameful practice is carried out by all the employment agencies in the city. There are many places where fraud is not perpetrated and where promises are fulfilled. Of these agencies one is located at 631 West Madison Street, a Mexican one which is operated honestly, and which carries out what it promises. There are others of this kind but it is evident that they are not numerous.

    We should stay away from those places where they promise much and give nothing.

    It was not long ago that a group of Mexicans lost money in dealing with one of these fraudulent agencies. All the efforts of our countrymen to recover the money which they had paid for employment they did not get, were in vain.

    It is evident that some of the employment agencies have studied the game to the end and that whatever money gets into their hands, is kept by them.

    Before registering at one of these employment agencies, make first an investigation about its integrity and then pass your findings on to other countrymen. To go blindly ahead and pay is the worst thing one can do.

    From time to time reports have reached this newspaper about some of our countrymen who have come to this city in search of work and who have become victims of ...

    Spanish
    II D 8, II E 3
  • Mexico -- October 13, 1928
    Candidate Seeks Mexican Vote

    John W. Jaranowski writes this open letter to the Chicago Mexicans:

    Dear friends:

    Permit to write to you regarding some administrative conditions in Cook County.

    Since my candidacy for office as Civil Service Examiner has been attacked by Americans who do not have any relations with the office of Examiner I ask you to consider the following points.

    It is true that I consider myself handicapped for having been born from poor parents in the Calumet district. I also feel handicapped because my parents are of foreign extraction. I also consider myself at a disadvantage for having to work for a living. But I am not ashamed to confess that every cent I possess in this world I have earned through hard labor.

    2

    I am proud of my friends and neighbors and of the community in which I live and was born. This community made me what I am, and I will remain loyal to it the rest of my life. I have contributed to its development in every way I could.

    My community elected me County Commissioner. While in office I have done every thing possible to help the poor taxpayers. As a candidate for Examiner I am the only one who has declared that all public employees should be in the Civil Service. I am the only candidate who has openly advocated the reduction of taxes.

    I promise on my word of honor that when elected Examiner, the Civil Service Office will be administered on the basis of efficiency, economy and courtesy to the public. With this platform I beg that you vote for me as Civil Service Examiner.

    John W. Jaranowski.

    John W. Jaranowski writes this open letter to the Chicago Mexicans: Dear friends: Permit to write to you regarding some administrative conditions in Cook County. Since my candidacy for office ...

    Spanish
    I F 4
  • Mexico -- October 13, 1928
    Important Notice.

    The Pan-American Club informs the Mexican colony of the inauguration of its new social center where Americans and Spanish-Americans will participate in various activities. The object of this club is to cultivate good relations between the Mexican colony and a large number of Americans who sympathize with the Mexican custom and language. The nature and disposition of this group makes it necessary to admit only persons whose integrity and assets are recognized in the social sphere. Being aware of the great number of respectable persons of which the Mexican colony is composed, we have no doubt of being supported by the majority of the Mexican colony in our great project.

    For details you may communicate with Manuel Garcia, Room 300, 160 N. La Salle street, who will be glad to inform you of the future activities of our club.

    The Pan-American Club informs the Mexican colony of the inauguration of its new social center where Americans and Spanish-Americans will participate in various activities. The object of this club is ...

    Spanish
    I C