The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 09, 1877
    Annette Essipoff

    Artists who are not preceded by their fame, gerecrally find themselves in a difficult position toward the public. They must at first captivate their audience. Mastery of instruments is not any longer rare today, and the public must be convinced that the artist is a master before it is willing to hear him.

    It is not surprising under surprising those circumstances, that the concert given last night in the now Chicago theater, by the Russian pianist, Mme. Annette Essipoff, did not draw a large crowd, but there were a great number of piano teachers in the audience.

    Mme. Annette Essipoff is an excellent pianist and is certainly not inferior to Alice Topp or Anna Heslig. She played to perfection the Andante and the Impromptu from: "Rose wade" by Schubert, as well as Schumanns's "Traumeswirren" and "Les doux Alouettes", a composition by her husband, Director of the St. Petersburg Conservatory of Music.

    The public awaited with special interest her interprotation of Chapin. Her requtation to be the best interpreter of this composer does not seem to us to be justified. Her playing lacks the necessary power to render the stormy ideas of Chopin.

    2

    Mrs. Essipoff lived up to the expectations of her audience. The only thing lacking seemed to be power, and this was perhaps due to the almost empty hall.

    Artists who are not preceded by their fame, gerecrally find themselves in a difficult position toward the public. They must at first captivate their audience. Mastery of instruments is not ...

    Russian
    III H, II B 1 a
  • Chicago Daily News -- November 21, 1890
    [Russian Literary Club Gives Entertainment]

    The first entertainment of the Russian Literary Club took place last evening at Emerson Hall. The program consisted of Russian national music and a one-act play entitled "The Secret Order."

    The officers of the new society are A. Shkarevitch, president; Mrs. Levin, secretary; and Miss Dvorkin, treasurer.

    The entertainments will take place weekly.

    The first entertainment of the Russian Literary Club took place last evening at Emerson Hall. The program consisted of Russian national music and a one-act play entitled "The Secret Order." ...

    Russian
    II B 1 d, II B 1 a, II B 1 c 1
  • Reform Advocate -- March 19, 1892
    [Relief Society Formed]

    Amass meeting of Jewish young men was held on March 13, 1892, at Kimball Hall. This mass meeting, composed of five-hundred young men of the city of Chicago, deeming prompt action better than slow relief, does now and hereby constitute itself a society to be known hereafter as "The Young Men's Russian Relief Association."

    The object of this organization is to cooperate with the executive committee of the Russian Aid Society, for the purpose of placing as speedily as possible the Jewish exiles driven from Russia, their native land, in such surroundings and positions as will make them self-supporting, with due and careful regard to the physical and moral requirements of the newcomers and the best interest of all classes of the general population of our country.

    The government of this association is to be vested in a board of directors, consisting of fifteen members, to be elected by this body, and the qualifications for which shall be that these are young men, and the board of directors are hereby fully vested with power to make all further rules and regulations 2and qualifications for membership of this organization as may seem to them just and proper.

    The following gentlemen were them selected as the executive committee: Oscar G. Foreman, Moses Solomon, Milton J. Foreman, August Gatzert, Julius E. Weil, Leo A. Loeb, Harry Pflaum, David Eichberg, Israel Cowen, Leon Hornstein, M. H. Mandelbaum, Ed. A. Rosenthal, Hilton A. Strauss, Leopold Oesterreicher and Sol D. Lee.

    The chair appointed a committee on collections, selecting one member from each if the organizations of our city wherein young men are represented, as follows: Phoenix Club, M. J. Spiegel; Ideal Club, S. J. Marks; Chicago Lodge, H. W. Hahn; West Chicago Club, Maurice Rothschild; Standard Club, Edwin F. Meyer; Herder Lodge, Max Guthman; Zion Literary Society, J. Ringer; North-West Chicago Club, Leo Taussig; Montefiore Council, Sam Rosenthal; Myrtle Council, Moritz Hirsch; Cremieux Society, Leon V. Becker; Concordia, Ralph Leopold; Lakeside Club, Maurice L. Ash; Lessing Club, Max Pam.

    3

    On Tuesday night, the newly elected executive committee met and organized by electing the following officers: President, Milton J. Foreman; First Vice-President, Julius E. Weil; Second Vice-President, Leon Hornstein; Recording Secretary, M. H. Mandelbaum; Financial Secretary, Harry Pflaum; Treasurer, Oscar G. Foreman.

    The committee on collections are already actively at work, and the result of their labor is seen in the contributions that are being obtained. The work is being pushed systematically, and many thousands of dollars will be raised among the young men.

    Amass meeting of Jewish young men was held on March 13, 1892, at Kimball Hall. This mass meeting, composed of five-hundred young men of the city of Chicago, deeming prompt ...

    Russian
    II D 1
  • Reform Advocate -- April 02, 1892
    [Sheltering House]

    The Executive Committee in aid of the Russian Refugees has purchased a large dwelling house, corner of Maxwell and Clinton streets, to be used as a sheltering house and relief office. The cost was $12,500, the money being advanced by the Baron De Hirsch Fund Trustees of New York, on the personal guarantee of five members of the Executive Committee, Messrs. Adolph Loeb, Joseph Beifeld, Herman Grossman, A. H. Wolf and Mayer Newmann.

    The Executive Committee in aid of the Russian Refugees has purchased a large dwelling house, corner of Maxwell and Clinton streets, to be used as a sheltering house and relief ...

    Russian
    II D 1, II D 6
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 25, 1892
    Chicago Russians Unite.

    The first Russian congregation of Chicago was organized here a week ago yesterday, May 17th, by members of the local Russian colony and other followers of the Greek-Catholic faith. The name selected for the new organization was the Congregation of St. Nicholas. Those in attendance subscribed toward a fund for the erection of a church building.

    The first Russian congregation of Chicago was organized here a week ago yesterday, May 17th, by members of the local Russian colony and other followers of the Greek-Catholic faith. The ...

    Russian
    III C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- November 09, 1892
    Russians Inaugurate Church Services in Chicago.

    The first Greek-Catholic church service in Chicago was held last Saturday evening, Nov. 5th. at 13 Center Avenue, by a Russian congregation, which as yet is very small in number. The service was conducted by Bishop Nicholas, who is the primate of the Greek-Catholic Church of the United States, with headquarters in San Francisco, California. Some of the priests from other parts of the country attended this initial service. In the morning of the following day, Sunday, High Mass was celebrated in the same place. The premises at 13 Center avenue have been leased by the congregation for one year.

    The first Greek-Catholic church service in Chicago was held last Saturday evening, Nov. 5th. at 13 Center Avenue, by a Russian congregation, which as yet is very small in number. ...

    Russian
    III C
  • Progress, Literaturno-Politicheskoye Obozrenie -- June 28, 1893
    The Russo-American Treaty.

    The magazine denounces the treaty entered into by the United States and Russia which provided for the extradition of criminals. It was feared that it would be used against Russian revolutionaries. "This convention, at the present time and in such a form, is nothing more than an official declaration of the sympathy of the American Government for the Russian Tsar. But back of the American Government there is still the American People."

    "Everywhere Russian immigrants have had the opportunity to arouse public discussion of the treaty the masses have shown themselves to be against it. We cannot call a halt. The treaty must and shall be annulled. Republicans and democrats alike are responsible; the negotiations began under Cleveland, the treaty was ratified by a republican senate with the aid of democratic votes (without which the two-thirds majority could not have been reached). The exchange of ratifications was carried out by Cleveland and Gresham, who insolently laughed at the protests of public opinion. The Russian citizens of America are bound to settle accounts with the venal tsarist satellites at the approaching elections. Russian Jews who vote for 2the republicans will vote for the Russian Tsar, for a system of political, religious and national intolerance, for the persecution of five millions of the Jewish masses. Such a Jewish republican or Jewish democrat every honest man will brand with the shameful name of Judas."

    The magazine denounces the treaty entered into by the United States and Russia which provided for the extradition of criminals. It was feared that it would be used against Russian ...

    Russian
    III B 1, I C, I E
  • Progress, Literaturno-Politicheskoye Obozrenie -- June 28, 1893
    The Campaign against the Russo-American Treaty.

    "For us Russians the most important event of the past two weeks has been the publication of the Russian-American Treaty." The writer then gives in a few words the history of attempts to negotiate such a treaty from 1873 to 1886. "Using the panic of the bourgeoisie which followed the events in Chicago in 1886, Russian officials renewed their underground machinations. Until taken up by the Russians the business remained in embryo. The treaty failed in the Senate. Its further history is already known to our readers. At the present time there is in progress active preparation for a new campaign against the treaty. In New York there has been formed an American "Society for Suppression of the Treaty", in Chicago likewise agitation has arisen. . . . The Russian-American League here opens its activity with a public Russian meeting on Saturday in the hall of the Progressive Club, Santer's Hall, corner Johnson and 14th Sts." (The text of the treaty is appended).

    "For us Russians the most important event of the past two weeks has been the publication of the Russian-American Treaty." The writer then gives in a few words the history ...

    Russian
    III B 1, I C, I E
  • Progress, Literaturno-Politicheskoye Obozrenie -- June 28, 1893
    Meeting in Honor of Haymarket Martyrs

    The magazine called the attention of its readers to the memorial meeting in honor of "the first martyrs of socialism in America." The editor of the Arbeiter-Zeitung and the widow of Parsons were to speak.

    The magazine called the attention of its readers to the memorial meeting in honor of "the first martyrs of socialism in America." The editor of the Arbeiter-Zeitung and the widow ...

    Russian
    I E
  • Record-Herald -- January 23, 1905
    Will Die for Liberty

    Chicago Russians, Russian Jews, and Poles and not a few Americans last night wildly acclaimed Mme. Katherine Bereshkovsky agent and representative of the Russian revolutionary propaganda. At the West Side Auditorium, Taylor and Center St. the spacious hall was filled to its seating capacity long before the time set for the meeting, while in the street outside surged many hundreds struggling for admission. Two policemen vainly attempted to control the crowd, which, despite the fact that the sale of tickets was stopped, forced its way into the hall.

    The punctuations of applause and cheering during the address of Mme. Bereshkovsky were echoed by the throng in the street, and at the conclusion of her speech in the hall Mme. Bereshkovsky addressed an open-air overflow meeting.

    2

    She spoke in Russian and without incendiary utterances, recited the wrongs of the Russian people and told of the progress of the revolutionary movement during the last forty years. She frequently was interrupted by cheering, and at the close of the meeting, as the gray-haired speaker seated herself on the floor of the stage, with her feet in the footlight trench, hundreds struggled to shake her hand, while cheer after cheer was given.

    Judge E. O. Brown, who presided at the meeting, was the only one to make reference to the sanguinary events of the day in St. Petersburg, none of the speakers having learned the details of the uprising. For a moment after he announced the report that many of their countrymen had fallen before the attacks of the troops, intense silence reigned, and then the audience burst into cheers for the revolution and hisses for the Romanoff dynasty.

    "I feel that my place is now in Russia "declared Mme. Bereshkovsky, in opening her address "The important epoch has arrived. In Russian prisons are perishing thousands who have worked and hoped for the event which now is transpiring.

    3

    For forty years this agitation has been carried on with the object of teaching the masses the true state of affairs in Russia.

    Russians, Poles, Jews, Finns and other subjects of the Czar have been horribly maltreated, as all the world knows.

    "At last the important moment has arrived for the nation to arise and demand political freedom. Now all are ready to die for the cause. The uprising will not be confined to St. Petersburg, but in every portion of Russia, in cities and villages, millions will join in the protest.

    "Many here in America and in other nations no doubt believed the Russians were not far above cattle intellectually. The world did not know the development that was going forward, until one fine morning the nations were astonished to learn that an open protest had been made. But to Russians it was no revelation. All knew that the supreme moment was coming, and now that the critical moment is here, all parties and nationalities in Russia are united for the one purpose.

    4

    Czar Nicholas has shown himself near-sighted and foolish not to have realized what the result would be.

    "But we must have sympathy and aid. America must sooner or later speak, and with the aid of free nations our task will be easier. We appeal to the nations of the world to help us appose tyranny. Forty years ago we were only a handful, now every class of people in every province is organized for the final blow. Many are in prison, many have perished, but as by magic thousands, tens of thousands, have risen to take their places in aid of the cause.

    "My purpose in coming here is to tell you these things, not because our organization is weak, but because we need sympathy and support and we will get it by letting the world know the truth. Many in this country are ready and willing to return to Russia and sacrifice their lives if need be to help free the nation from tyranny. The Czar is not what he has been pictured he is a weakling.

    5

    Our dream is soon to be realized. The time for the final blow is here."

    Peter Sissmann, an attorney, spoke in Yiddish, appealing for financial aid for the revolution.

    Miss Jane Addams spoke of Tolstoy's prediction of a passive revolution and said the time had come for the Russians to demonstrate the new conception of freedom and brotherhood.

    "Three things are asked," she said- "freedom of speech, a free assembly and abolition of autocracy.

    All America can stand for these three things, and liberty lovers throughout the world can side with the movement."

    Dr. Theodore B. Sachs, who translated Mme. Bereshkovsky's speech into English, added on his own behalf that as a Russian Jew he had prayed daily for the success of the revolutionary movement.

    "As Russian Jews" he said "we love Russia, but we abhor the Russian government."

    6

    Clarence S. Darrow, who had been announced to speak, was out of the city, and Jenkin LLoyd Jones was absent on account of a cold.

    Chicago Russians, Russian Jews, and Poles and not a few Americans last night wildly acclaimed Mme. Katherine Bereshkovsky agent and representative of the Russian revolutionary propaganda. At the West Side ...

    Russian
    I E