The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Zgoda -- March 02, 1887
    Attention Polish People

    A big excursion to northern Minnesota to see tracts of land suitable for farming will leave Monday, March 21, at eleven A. M. People wishing to see this wonderful section of land, will please come and see Mr. Stominski.

    The train fare from Chicago is only ten dollars for a round trip, but if you buy a tract of land this amount will be a part of down payment. I am sure, that the people taking this trip will be so satisfied that they will buy at least one acre of land. This section is near town and close to railroads.

    People buying land will be given six years to pay for it. You needn't be afraid to buy this land. No doubt you have read numerous articles about it in the Polish newspapers.

    In this new Polish colony, under the name of "Poznan," there is located the Red Wood Company of Minnesota. Here the land is as low as $6.00 up to $8.00 an acre. At the time of purchase only one dollar an acre is required as a deposit, and the rest payable in six years at 7 per cent interest, minus the $10.00 train fare.

    2

    This is the ideal location in Minnesota for farming, cattle raising, and raising of other domestic animals. All of you have intentions of buying, please do not hesitate, because now is the time to buy, while the prices are low. Furthermore, you are used to working on your own farm and not to this continuous changing of work in the city factories, where they do not guarantee you work in your old age. For information pertaining to the land in Minnesota, write to

    St. Slominski

    666 Milwaukee Avenue

    Chicago, Ill.

    A big excursion to northern Minnesota to see tracts of land suitable for farming will leave Monday, March 21, at eleven A. M. People wishing to see this wonderful section ...

    Polish
    I L
  • Zgoda -- March 16, 1887
    Organizing Polish Bakers

    Attempts to organize a Polish bakers union in Chicago has not come to an end, because at the last meeting March 5th at Greenwall's hall at Blackhawk and Holt Avenues were many bakers, who were in favor of such an organization. This union was finally organized March 19th at Greenwall's hall.

    Only bakers are entitled to join as members, with the exception of Mr.W. KARLOWSKI, who is an honorary member.

    It is the intentions of this organization to join with the knights of labor to make this labor group stronger. If this went through, it would make it the fourth local of the knights of labor in Chicago. They are striving to have one more local join this union, if five locals were joined as one it would require permission from the other unions, before any matter would be taken up. This is something that the Polish people should take into consideration, do their utmost to see this in reality.

    W. Karlowski

    Attempts to organize a Polish bakers union in Chicago has not come to an end, because at the last meeting March 5th at Greenwall's hall at Blackhawk and Holt Avenues ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 2
  • Zgoda -- March 30, 1887
    From Our Press

    Chicago Courier, the first Polish daily in the United States, has stopped its presses forever because it was not supported, It is very sad to say that a paper of this calibre, dealing with Polish politics and the welfare of the Polish people, could not be supported by true Poles.

    The editor of the Courier, Mr. Sadowski, takes this opportunity to thank the people for their best efforts to keep this newspaper in circulation, and he is very sorry that in spite of the large number of Poles in the United States, this paper had to stop its publication due to lack of support.

    This paper supported all the Polish movements, their enterprises, their very lives; still it didn't do enough to exist among their own blood. I hope that everyone who contributed to its downfall is satisfied, because our existence was not one road strewn with flowers.

    It is hinted that Mr. Sadowski will be the editor of the new Polish 2newspaper, Poles in America, which will soon be put in circulation in Buffalo.

    We do not think that we need a horoscope reading in regard to the value of this new Polish newspaper or the articles appearing in it, because we know the record and the good work of Mr. Sadowski. Therefore we feel that his work will be honest and sincere.

    We feel that Mr. Sadowski is broad-minded and can go far in bringing before the eyes of the Polish people the news that interests them most.

    In this belief we wish the Poles of America a success, and we send our heartiest wishes to our colleague, and hope that he meets with less misfortune than he did while in the services of the Courier.

    Chicago Courier, the first Polish daily in the United States, has stopped its presses forever because it was not supported, It is very sad to say that a paper of ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 1, IV
  • Zgoda -- October 26, 1887
    Polish Library in New York

    We are informed that in New York, Mr. Sigmund Slupski, formerly a newspaper editor in Radom, Poland, opened a Polish Library; it is also a renting library.

    A Polish library, conducted skillfully by a man well trained in his profession can bring numerous social benefits, which it already has done. It will continue to give true service, providing the renting dept. has many calls for good books, which is one way of running this library.

    For that reason we welcome this new Polish enterprise, and in the beginning we send our sincere and heartiest congratulations.

    We will also add that this new library has books dealing with Polish ways of living. These books are also for sale if people desire them. This library also takes care of sending letters, and other means of communicating with people in Europe.

    2

    Therefore that is the reason why this field is open for a capable man we have one of our prominent Polish editors working in the research dept. dealing with the selling of old books.

    Mr. Sienkiewicz is in charge of this research dept; he is honest, trustworthy, and capable of doing this work in this new Polish library solely for the benefit of the Polish people.

    We are informed that in New York, Mr. Sigmund Slupski, formerly a newspaper editor in Radom, Poland, opened a Polish Library; it is also a renting library. A Polish library, ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a
  • Zgoda -- February 08, 1888
    A Political Ward in Distress

    A new election law, for the first time this spring, will demand that the polling booths be at least 200 feet away from any kind of a business. The 7th ward in our city already happens to be looking for a place, in conformity with the above mentioned law, but just can't seem to find any place, because there is not one block in the whole ward where there is not a saloon.

    A new election law, for the first time this spring, will demand that the polling booths be at least 200 feet away from any kind of a business. The 7th ...

    Polish
    I B 1
  • Zgoda -- March 07, 1888
    Political Club

    Article written by Mr. K. Olszewski,

    Chicago, March 1, 1888.

    The first Polish political club is now being organized in the vicinity of Main St. Citizens, hearing of this, went there and were told by well known speakers of fine reputation they would make themselves and their magistrates known. Every one present was glad to hear it and willing to do his share.

    This way we shall be able to have this political club organized. Every Pole living in this neighborhood is invited to our large meeting which is held frequently.

    K. Olszewski.

    Article written by Mr. K. Olszewski, Chicago, March 1, 1888. The first Polish political club is now being organized in the vicinity of Main St. Citizens, hearing of this, went ...

    Polish
    I F 2
  • Zgoda -- July 25, 1888
    Polish Club in Chicago

    At the 16th political ward where not so long ago the Poles elected their first Polish alderman, Mr. A. J. Kowalski, a Republican Polish club has been established.

    The president is Mr. M. Osucha, and the secretary, Mr. I. N. Morgenstern.

    We shall have more news about this in our future issues.

    At the 16th political ward where not so long ago the Poles elected their first Polish alderman, Mr. A. J. Kowalski, a Republican Polish club has been established. The president ...

    Polish
    I F 2, IV
  • Zgoda -- October 31, 1888
    "Why"

    Whoever passes by the streets, in the neighborhood of Milwaukee and Noble Street, must have noticed the Polish business establishments going out of business while others not only stay in business but manage to make nice profits. The Poles, are forced to close their establishments, because they cannot meet their expenses. When you pass some of the stores you will be dragged in by the arms and find yourself in the hands of a Jew and bidding for some article that you may need. But never fear he will meet your price. Many of our Poles, especially the women folks, claim they have saved money by their ability of knowing how to "Jew down".

    Naturally our Polish business men do not use this method, although their prices are not any higher than the Jews, and don't seem to progress in their trade.

    2

    We should be ashamed of ourselves, that we take our hard earned money to the others, instead of to our Polish business man.

    The Jew or German would never aid a Pole, if he were in need, and not one cent would he give for Polish affairs, although from the Poles he manages to secure his wealth. So then for this reason we wish you would patronize your fellow-countryman and not others.

    Whoever passes by the streets, in the neighborhood of Milwaukee and Noble Street, must have noticed the Polish business establishments going out of business while others not only stay in ...

    Polish
    II A 2, I C
  • Zgoda -- November 14, 1888
    The Affairs of Polish Schools

    It is difficult to give you the actual statistics of Polish schools in the United States. The census taken here of Polish children attending parochial schools is about 17,000.

    In these Polish schools over thirty secular priests teach, the rest of the teachers being nuns.

    We find a shortage of higher schools for our Polish children. Our young Polish children, wanting to obtain a higher education, must seek it in English or German institutions where often they forget their native tongue, and a Pole who can't speak Polish is useless to his Fatherland. And not only to his country, but, as the case may be, to the church and the Catholic religion.

    We must hope that by working and economizing, our poor immigration of today shall yet stand on an equal footing with other nationalities. The English, Irish, and Germans did not bring any capital here with them to America, but 2today there is a colossal American fortune in their hands. Let us try just now, to preserve our present capital, religion, nationality, and Polish virtues.

    It is difficult to give you the actual statistics of Polish schools in the United States. The census taken here of Polish children attending parochial schools is about 17,000. In ...

    Polish
    I A 2 a, III C, III A, I A 2 b
  • Zgoda -- December 05, 1888
    Organization of Mieczystaw

    A newly organized club of National Polish Artisans of King Mieczystaw I held its meeting the 18th of November at the hall of Mr. Albert Kowalski, on the corner of Noble Street and Milwaukee Avenue.

    At first they read the constitution, its aims, and the future of this newly organized club, and then they invited the president of the N. P. A., Mr. Osucha, to be their speaker.

    Mr. Osucha, taking the stand, expressed his gratification that brothers joining the new organization understood its qualities, its merits, and the importance of it to the Polish National Alliance, and so every one expressed the feeling of readiness in joining this alliance.

    The National Alliance, he said, labors for the nation and so expressed itself in its constitution. Under the banner of the organization we can work without fear. Our work is open and so our aim to be larger and better needs your support. Here in America we have freedom, and so for this reason we should take advantage of it by giving our nation the greatest support.

    A newly organized club of National Polish Artisans of King Mieczystaw I held its meeting the 18th of November at the hall of Mr. Albert Kowalski, on the corner of ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II A 1