The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- October 12, 1877
    Polish Patriots Second Day of the Convention

    The second day's session of the fifth annual Convention of the Polish Catholic Union of the United States was held yesterday at the corner of Noble and Bradley streets. There were some twenty societies represented by delegates. The Rev. Father L. Moczygemba, of Jeffersonville, Ind., presided, John Barzynski, secretary.

    A committee of three, composed of P. Kiolbassa, the Rev. Kosloski, of La Salle, and the Rev. Joseph Dombrowski, was appointed for the purpose of finding a suitable place in which to establish a Polish Orphan Asylum, and to raise funds among the Polish Societies through the country for that purpose.

    The second day's session of the fifth annual Convention of the Polish Catholic Union of the United States was held yesterday at the corner of Noble and Bradley streets. There ...

    Polish
    III B 4, II D 4, III C
  • Chicago Times -- October 14, 1878
    Poor Poles, They Find in America the Free Home Denied by Europe

    The Polish Residents In This Country Are About To Hold Their First Regular Convention......Natives Of Poland In This Country, Nearly All Of Whom Are Exiles.....

    A curious people, springing from one of the savage tribes that occupied central Europe at the time of the downfall of Rome, they advanced rapidly in arts of peace and war until they became one of the greatest powers of Christendom.

    The Poles are of Slavic origin. In consulting the ancient maps, it will be found that a tribe called the Polani dwelt in a small space between the Oder and the Vistula rivers.

    2

    In Chicago there are over 7,000 families of Poles and five societies. There are three Polish churches in Chicago.

    In the matter of education, the Poles of Chicago are not behind other nationalities. There is a school connected with St. Stanislaus Church, taught by nuns, or "Sisters" as they are uniformly called. Here, besides the usual branches that are taught in public schools instruction is given in the Polish language and literature. There is a Polish newspaper published in Chicago called the Gazetta Polska.

    Among the projects to be laid before the convention will be the establishment of a half-orphan asylum and a college for instruction in the Polish language.

    The Polish Residents In This Country Are About To Hold Their First Regular Convention......Natives Of Poland In This Country, Nearly All Of Whom Are Exiles..... A curious people, springing from ...

    Polish
    III B 4, III G
  • Chicago Tribune -- September 24, 1880
    Convention

    The first annual convention of the United Polish Benevolent Society was begun yesterday in the club-room of the Palmer House.

    Credentials were presented by the following delegates:- J. Andrzejkowicz, Philadelphia; J. Glowczynski, Grand Rapids, Mich.; K. J. Malsk, Northim, Wis.; F. J. Borchardt and J. Wendzinski, Milwaukee; R. Stobiecki, F. Sowadski, J. Krzemieniecki, W. Puterch, I. Rewerski, M. Kucera, and W. Dyniewitz, Chicago. Mr. J. Andrzejkowicz was chosen as chairman.

    A new constitution and by-laws were presented, and the meeting adjourned until today, when the annual election of officers will be held.

    The first annual convention of the United Polish Benevolent Society was begun yesterday in the club-room of the Palmer House. Credentials were presented by the following delegates:- J. Andrzejkowicz, Philadelphia; ...

    Polish
    III B 4, II D 1
  • Zgoda -- January 26, 1887
    Slander

    There are many Americans who give our forefathers credit for their splendid support of the Catholic religion and their undying love for their native land.

    Not long ago something was said in regard to the above mentioned which caused hard feelings and misunderstanding among Polish people; we feel that it should be overlooked.

    American citizens attending the Polish National Alliance convention began collecting donations to support and maintain the academy and convent of the Ursulan Sisters. Donations were given good-heartedly.

    During a church mission in a small town near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a Polish Catholic priest, Father Koluszewski of Cleveland, ascended the pulpit and denounced sternly the donations given to support the "n Home."

    2

    "Who gave them permission," said the Reverend Father to the congregation, "to take care of the collections for the Ursulans? Do not believe them; they are liars, these Ursulans; they are a suspicious group of ladies. In the old country the devil sent women to do his bidding where he himself had failed."

    I will not say anything that you can hold against me but I will add this - that the reason for the sudden anger of Reverend Father Koluszewski against the Ursulans is that the Polish National Alliance of America is taking care of the donations for the Ursulans and is being fully supported by its 3,000 members and by different societies and Catholic institutions.

    Reverend Father Koluszewski is himself working against the Polish National Alliance; he cannot understand how an organization as big as the P. N. A. can undertake so great a responsibility and still have so many Roman Catholic priests striving for an opportunity to join it.

    Reverend Koluszewski's speech from the pulpit only caused the people to 3leave in great anger; it caused ill feeling among the P. N. A. members because they were willing to contribute to the support of poor Ursulan Sisters' Convent.

    Another priest said: "As a priest, I am humiliated at the sudden outburst of Reverend Father Koluszerski; as a Pole, I cannot find words to apoligize for his behavior. I know that from our native country the poorest class of people crossed the ocean in search of a country where they could be taken care of in their old age, as for example, the Home of the Ursulan Sisters. This institution is also striving to save our children from the shame put upon their souls because of the lack of education. They are working to teach our Polish children the success and pleasures of life received from having a good education and from the teachings of the Catholic religion.

    It also shows in old records that the head of this institution, Superior Sister Morawska, donated her farm and all her money in her home town of Poland for the building of this home, Ursulan Sisters. This shows that any propaganda or slander said against these "Sisters" is only used as an obstruction against the Polish people in their effort to advance and their 4undying love for the Catholic religion.

    Almighty God will punish the trouble-maker who spoke so rudely about the Ursulan Sisters and their undying love for the Catholic religion.

    Dr. Rev. Father Kanonik.

    There are many Americans who give our forefathers credit for their splendid support of the Catholic religion and their undying love for their native land. Not long ago something was ...

    Polish
    III C, I A 2 a, II D 5, III B 2, I K, III B 4, I A 2 c
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 24, 1891
    "They Are Revealing Their Will to Us" (Editorial)

    The vice censor of the Polish National Alliance has expressed his opinion about that organization. According to him, the lodges belonging to the P. N. A. are not allowed to make any decisions without the consent, or rather without the will, of the central board of that organization.

    Is this in reality the opinion of each separate lodge? And do sensible members of the P. N. A. share that point of view? The near future will tell.

    As soon as the program of the three-day celebration commemorating the Polish Constitution of the Third of May, arranged by the Polish Roman Catholic Union was announced in Dziennik Chicagoski, a very severe criticism of our article appeared [in the next] issue of Zgoda.

    2

    Every part of the program--the three-day celebration, the memorial service for those who sacrificed their lives for the Fatherland, the plan of holding a general Polish conference--is represented in Zgoda as a farce, an act of treason, an infamy, a disgrace and a deception.

    On the other hand, neither the organ of the P. R. C. U., Wiara I Ojczyna nor Dziennik Chicagoski, supporting the three-day celebration, criticized one point of the celebration arranged by the P. N. A. for the second of May. Angered by this lack of criticism, Zgoda suspected that their celebration would be branded a "masonic rabble."

    In view of the first fact mentioned, let the sensible members of the P. N. A. (if the vice censor's statement does not hold for them) decide who behaved patriotically, who showed more fairness.

    Let us mention another fact. Some P. N. A. lodges sent their delegates to Rev. V. Barzynski last year to arrange a general celebration in honor of the 3Polish Constitution of the Third of May. A conference was held at which Father V. Barzynski's remarks provoked those delegates and later angered the lodges to such a degree that they refused to come to an understanding with the P. R. C. U. societies or to negotiate with them. Immediately Zgoda attacked Rev. V. Barzynski. Quite naturally the attack aroused the indignation of the societies which respect Father Barzynski as a patriot and exemplary priest. This of course made a reconciliation almost impossible. At that time, that is after the return of the delegates from Father V. Barzynski with their proposal, every impartial person, including some of the delegates and Father V. Barzynski himself, thought that after the presentation of the proposition to the P. N. A. lodges, an attempt would be made either to modify the stipulation or to make a counter proposal. Nothing of the kind occurred although there were violent attacks upon the priest because he dared to give his conscientious advice.

    This mutual indignation manifested itself in violent eruptions of abusive language on one side, and anger on the other. At that time these undignified 4attacks could be explained and justified by the "hot Polish temper".

    Some reflection should have taken place, at least after some time. The P. N. A. lodges should have made an attempt at reconciliation with the societies affiliated with the P. R. C. U., and these societies should have shown their willingness to reach an understanding. And they did, for they sent letters to the P. N. A. lodges in which they proposed a general conference after the second of May. Zgoda, however, prevented the P. N. A. lodges from participating in that conference; it ridiculed the program of the societies affiliated with the P. R. C. U. and insulted Father V. Barzynski as the adviser of the P. R. C. Union. It tried to provoke criticism of the celebration arranged by the P. N. A., and being unsuccessful, began to fabricate stories about that celebration. Finally, the censor of the P. N. A. announced that its lodges would comply with the decision of the central board of the P. N. A. This decision was not to participate in the conference.

    Let sensible members of the P. N. A. suggest what more could have been done 5by the societies affiliated with the P. R. C. U. They expressed their desire for an agreement. Could these societies, after what took place, after the insults heaped upon a respected counsellor, declare that they were willing, for the sake of holy peace, to give up their spiritual adviser and ask permission to participate in the P. N. A. celebration?

    Every sensible person will admit that these societies did more than was expected. Not being invited, they are not criticizing the P. N. A. celebration, and having no desire to interfere with it, they have arranged for their own to take place the following day. They are extending a friendly hand in spite of the insults of Zgoda and of malicious tongues. They are charitable although they are twice as strong. And you--that is your correspondents in Zgoda--ridicule their generous actions. You sneer at every statement, at every step taken, and you increasingly anger their spiritual counsellor by your vicious attacks. Finally your vice censor makes a proclamation stating that you can take no steps until your executive committee reveals its decision.

    6

    How ridiculous are some of the reasons invented by Zgoda for not participating in the proposed general conference. According to Zgoda this conference is a deception. How can it be a deception when you will have an equal voice in it? You presume that your celebration of May 2 will be criticized anyhow, and so you continue to criticize viciously the program of the P. R. C. U. although there is no criticism made of your own program. You state that Father V. Barzynski, and not the societies, is arranging the celebration. While this statement has never been confirmed, not even by one of the societies, you yourselves declare very clearly that you are acting on the decision of your executive committee.

    Your censor has made an ironic remark that there is no necessity of sending delegates to Chicago as though it were some kind of Mecca. Now if we are going to hold a general assembly, then there must be a suitable place for it. Is it strange that the city of Chicago which has the largest Polish population was chosen, or that the P. R. C. U., the largest Polish organization in America, is extending the invitation?

    7

    Wherever there is ill will, there is always faultfinding in everything, no matter how small; where there is good will, small mistakes are overlooked, and necessary sacrifices made for the good of the cause.

    The vice censor of the Polish National Alliance has expressed his opinion about that organization. According to him, the lodges belonging to the P. N. A. are not allowed to ...

    Polish
    III B 3 a, IV, I C, III B 4, III B 2, II B 2 d 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- September 29, 1891
    Is it Possible? (Editorial)

    In the issue for September 26 of this year of Ameryka--a journal well-known for the publishing of deliberate falsehoods--we read an extensive account of the convention of the Polish National Alliance, which was held in Detroit, Michigan. One of the paragraphs in this article reads as follows:

    "A resolution was adopted to condemn the following Polish newspapers: Wiarus, Polak W Ameryce, Wiara I Ojczyzna, and Dziennik Chicagoski. The editors of these newspapers were accused of dishonesty and branded as outcasts."

    Is it possible that such a public resolution was adopted by the convention of the Polish National Alliance? We will admit that a certain organization may not like the policy of a particular newspaper; we will also admit that such an organization may even, in its private meetings, condemn that newspaper, but to 2accuse the editors publicly of dishonesty or brand them as outcasts at a convention about which even other nationalities talk and write, just because they are exponents of different ideas, would be taking a great responsibility. It would, in fact, be disgraceful.

    We did not believe that the paragraph which we read was true. In order to verify it, we made a private investigation by asking some delegates to the convention whether these reports were true. All delegates whom we asked categorically denied that the second part of the above-mentioned paragraph was true; besides, all of them asserted that Dziennik Chicagoski was not even mentioned at the convention. Others stated, in addition, that the resolution against Wiara I Ojczyzna (Faith and Country) was not adopted.

    At any rate, this curious item was published in Ameryka, and as long as there is no official denial, we will not know whether it is true or not. If it is not true, we expect official retraction. We would like to know and we must know whether the Polish National Alliance takes the responsibility for such 3a resolution or whether Ameryka is guilty of misrepresentation of the facts.

    Ameryka also states that W. Prybeski was elected censor, and Rewerski assistant censor, of the Polish National Alliance, and H. Nagiel, was chosen as editor of Zgoda.

    Finally, we demand that the publishers of Ameryka disclose, according to the permission given them, the name of the correspondent who "can prove" that there is no dependable Polish school in Chicago; that the teachers in Polish parochial schools do not know how to write Polish and yet teach it to others; that the Catholic Church forbids sending children to American public schools, on account of which the Poles are afraid to educate their children; that if any Pole sends his children to a high school and wishes to prepare them to become decent citizens, he is immediately condemned publicly by the priests from the pulpits, and is ostracized by the other Poles; that our priests commit crimes mentioned by the correspondent, and so on.

    In the issue for September 26 of this year of Ameryka--a journal well-known for the publishing of deliberate falsehoods--we read an extensive account of the convention of the Polish National ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 1, III C, III B 4, III B 2, I A 2 b, I A 2 a, I A 1 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 03, 1891
    Convention of Polish Journalists (A reprint from Kurjer Polski)

    Polish journalists held a convention in Detroit, Michigan, last week, about which Kurjer Polski writes as follows:

    "Whether the convention of Polish journalists was a success is hard to say. It was not a success in this respect: respectable journals of religious and conservative tendencies were not adequately represented, and colleagues who know how to create discord and obstruct the work were also absent.

    "It is true that the participants in the Convention of Polish Journalists consisted of the members of the Polish National Alliance, who had credentials as delegates to the Convention or were hunting for the editorship of Zgoda [Polish Weekly], the organ of the Polish National Alliance, but it is also true that at the sessions of the Convention they lost the character of partiality, became interested in [the] Polish press, and considered the welfare of others.

    2

    "Besides, we are anxious to know whether it would be possible to hold any-where another convention, with greater representation, which would humble the one which was held in Detroit, Michigan. Up to now all attempts in this direction were not very successful, and the condition in which our [Polish] journalism finds itself at present indicates very clearly that it would be unfair to demand more than what has been accomplished. Even the three sessions held on Tuesday, Friday night, and Saturday were more hasty than regular. However, a mutual understanding was reached and a new Polish organization, named "Stowarzyszenie Prasy Polsko Amerykanskiej" (Polish-American Press Association), was organized.

    "The new association will be represented by a temporary committee consisting of five members. The following members compose the committee: Reverend Barabasz, editor of Niedziela (Sunday); Casimir Neuman, editor of Kurjer Polski (Polish Courier); J. M. Sadowski, associate editor of Echo; Zbikniew Brodowski, a newspaper correspondent. These four members will ask Mr. W. 3Dyniewicz the editor of Gazeta Polska, or Mr. Smulski, the editor of Gazeta Katolicka (Catholic Gazette), to be the fifth member. They will also choose from their midst a chairman, a cashier, a secretary, so that the committee may begin to function.

    "The[task]of the temporary committee will be[as follows]:

    "To ask publishers, editors, and associate editors of all Polish newspapers to join the Polish-American Press Association.

    "To form a constitution according to the suggestions made at the convention by the new members.

    "To form a court of ethics which would guard journalistic decency.

    "To help the editors of Polish newspapers by sending complaints to the Post Office against carelessness of the letter carriers and obtaining names of dishonest debtors.

    4

    "To defend[the]Polish name by exposing deliberate libels spread by unfriendly papers published in this country.

    "To care for the purity of the language by discouraging the use of colloquialisms which are not understood in[the]fatherland.

    "To arrange in a short time for another convention made up of actual members of the Association for the purpose of electing a regular management, approving the suggested constitution and passing other resolutions.

    "At the first convention, the members of the Polish-American Press Association were guaranteed freedom of speech in religious matters, social questions, and in respect to Polish organizations--however it was suggested to treat these matters objectively, without attacking personalities in controversies.

    "The result of the Detroit Convention is considered as a small seed but a healthy one. The fruit of this seed may be either valuable or worthless; 5it will depend on the soil which we prepare for it.

    "We have fulfilled our duty as citizens, without any other object but one--to improve the condition of[the]Polish-American Press.

    "Non-members not satisfied with the temporary resolutions passed in Detroit, Michigan, may send one dollar to I. M. Sadowski, the secretary, Buffalo, New York, and express their wishes. They will be considered if they agree with the thought of the resolutions of the first convention."

    Polish journalists held a convention in Detroit, Michigan, last week, about which Kurjer Polski writes as follows: "Whether the convention of Polish journalists was a success is hard to say. ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 1, IV, III B 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 05, 1891
    Eighteenth Convention of the Polish Roman Catholic Union in America (Summary)

    According to the instructions given by Mr. Peter Kiolbassa, president of the Polish Roman Catholic Union in America, the delegates representing different groups of this organization in Chicago and Milwaukee gathered on September 29 at the railroad station, whence they left at 3:10 P.M. in a chartered coach for the convention. Delegates from other cities, as well as members of the clergy, boarded the train here and there along the route, and thus the party arrived at 5:00 P.M. in the small but romantic city of Manticoke, Pennsylvania, which is situated in the mountains.

    Some delegates found lodgings with local members; others went to hotels. As soon as quarters were found, everyone felt at home, thanks to Polish hospitality.

    2

    On September 30, at 2 P.M., the delegates gathered at the Broadway Armory, which was beautifully decorated with all kinds of banners on the outside and with beautiful garlands, wreaths, and portraits of the Polish heroes and Kosciusko and Pulaski on the inside. There were many banners and American and Polish flags, among them a Polish flag with a white eagle.

    The president of the Union, Mr. Peter Kiolbassa, asked Reverend W. Raszkiewicz to say a prayer, after which he formally opened the eighteenth convention of the Polish Roman Catholic Union of America with a speech full of enthusiasm.

    Up to then, out of the seventy-eight societies which constitute the Union, only forty-five delegates had arrived. There were fourteen priests.

    The president of the organization made a suggestion, which was unanimously accepted, that Mr. Ignacy Machnikowski, editor of the organ of the Polish Roman Catholic Union, be made secretary of the convention.

    3

    A Committee on Resolutions was formed, end Reverend V. Barzynski of Chicago was chosen as one of its members.

    Dziennik Chicagoski, Oct. 6, 1891.

    Mr. Peter Kiolbassa made a motion that the delegates gather on the following day at 9 o'clock in the morning at the hall, from where they would march to church. The motion was carried.

    Reverend V. Barzynski announced that the very Reverend Bishop O'Hara, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, would honor the convention with his presence of the next day's church services.

    First Evening Session

    Before seven o'clock in the evening, the hall was so full of people that some had to stand outside. The session started at half past seven.

    4

    Mr. Ignacy Machnikowski of Chicago, who was the first speaker, expressed his gratitude for the honor of addressing such a large Polish audience, and then spoke of our American good laws of freedom, liberty,and tolerance, which do not exist in Russia and Prussia.

    He praised the Polish Roman Catholic Union in America for its great merits, for its good work, for establishing parishes, building churches, schools, and libraries; he praised the organization for holding national celebrations and arranging theatrical plays. He made many good suggestions and remarked that we should not be indifferent as to what kind of people fill the world; that, according to the will of God, the world should not be filled with people who live only for the pleasure or satisfaction of their daily needs; for they are not capable of fulfilling God's plan on earth. Only those people can fulfill God's plan who can raise themselves above this world. Such aim may be attained only by a truly religious person, for religion teaches us duties toward God and country, and for this reason it is the most important factor in education. He spoke about parochial schools and their great influence. He assailed the 5opponents of parochial schools and begged his countrymen to send their children to these institutions.

    The next speaker was Reverend V. Barzynski, who was received with great ovation, and who spoke of the great difficulties [met by the]Polish clergy in America, of the enemies and opponents of religion and the Roman Catholic Church in America, and of our fatherland and its fate. He also mentioned our great men, artists, writers, heroes, and called upon his listeners to follow their example. His speech, which is a gem and was stenographically reported, was rewarded with great applause.

    Dziennik Chicagoski, Oct. 7, 1891.

    The chairman invited Mr. Peter Kiolbassa again to the stand, and the latter delivered another speech in which he compared the Polish settlements of Chicago with those of New York and other cities praised the Polish clergy for its splendid work. Tremendous applause rewarded the speaker.

    6

    The next speaker was Reverend Wojcik from Minnesota, who, in a very interesting talk, described a certain fashionable residential district, its unnatural life and bad example.

    Dziennik Chicagoski, Oct. 8, 1891.

    Finally, Reverend Stephen Szymanowski of Camden, J. J., chairman of the convention, took the floor and stated that the Americans must respect the Poles, and then he said, "I will take the liberty to point out what kind of Poles I mean, and my task will be simplified by presenting to you a practical and exemplary type of Pole whom you whould strive to emulate; he is in our midst, and his name is Peter Kiolbassa. (This remark brought prolonged applause). By his work, integrity, steadfastness of character, loyalty to the Catholic Church and fatherland, he has gained the respect and affection not only of the Poles but also of the people of other nationalities. His high position as city treasurer has not in any way changed him, for he is a man of unwavering principles.

    7

    "If all Poles in America would conduct themselves as he does, then the people of other nationalities would be obliged to respect them."

    Dziennik Chicagoski, Oct. 9, 1891.

    The September 30 afternoon session began at 2:18 P.M. with a prayer by Reverend V. Barzynski, chairman of the committee, introduced a motion that the wording of some paragraphs in the constitution of the organization be changed for the purpose of removing their ambiguity, and proposed the elimination of paragraph 1, article fourteen, of the constitution, alleging it was obscure and unnecessary. The motion was put to a vote and adopted unanimously.

    Other paragraphs of the constitution were put to a vote and adopted.

    8

    The next item on the program was the official organ of the organization. Mr. Kiolbassa asserted that the Polish Roman Catholic Union in America was strong enough to have its own organ published and supported by the organization. All agreed that such organ was necessary. However, Reverend V. Barzynski declared that he knew from experience it would be hard for such organ to exist, saying that some time ago the organization had adopted a resolution that every member should subscribe [to] Wiara I Otczyzna (Faith and Fatherland) but no one had complied with it.

    Mr. Kiolbassa supported the objection of Reverend V. Barzynski, arguing that the maintenance of such organ would put the organization to a great expense.

    Finally a motion was made that the weekly publication Wiara I Ojczyzna be adopted as the organ of the Polish Roman Catholic Union of America, and that it be published twice a week. This motion was carried unanimously.

    9

    There were many patriotic and religious speeches on September 30 by delegates from other cities. The last speaker was Mr. Ignacy Machnikowski of Chicago, who spoke of the Roman Catholic Church and its great and uplifting work, and who displayed a profound knowledge of history--ecclesiastical and political. He also spoke of our unfortunate fatherland and the fate of our people, our patriots, and our great heroes, warned us against the danger of discord, and recommended harmony and co-operation. Great applause.

    Dziennik Chicagoski, Oct. 14, 1891.

    The Thursday Oct. 1, 1891, session began at 9:30 A.M., right after church services. After the reading of telegrams and other correspondence, the delegates resumed their tasks. New motions were made and carried, and resolutions were adopted. Finally, Reverend V. Barzynski announced that an election of officers should take place. The motion was carried unanimously and Mr. Peter Kiolbassa was reelected president by acclamation. The newly elected president thanked the delegates for their support. Mr. John Arkuszewski of Chicago was elected vice-president of the organization, and Mr. Gniot of Chicago cashier.

    10

    Then a board of directors was elected, which passed a few resolutions. Finally, the presidential oath of office was administered to Mr. Kiolbassa and the directors, and the convention was over.

    According to the instructions given by Mr. Peter Kiolbassa, president of the Polish Roman Catholic Union in America, the delegates representing different groups of this organization in Chicago and Milwaukee ...

    Polish
    III B 4, IV, I A 2 a, II B 2 d 2
  • Zgoda -- May 25, 1892
    Local News

    The Polish Daily News published a request endorsed by Mr. Peter Kiolbasa, given in the name of the United States veterans of America, in which he invites all of the Polish army organizations, regardless of from what section they come from, to be present at the parade in the city the 30th of May, 1892, Decoration Day, in order to pay tribute to the heroes who gave up their lives for the freedom of this country.

    The Polish Daily News published a request endorsed by Mr. Peter Kiolbasa, given in the name of the United States veterans of America, in which he invites all of the ...

    Polish
    III B 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 09, 1892
    [The Convention of the Liberty] (Editorial)

    We have finally received some information as to why the Liberty League gives no evidence of its presence. The "Zgoda" press offers an explanation to the answer of the Committee of the All-Republican Congress, from which we are informed that the convention of the Liberty League has been postponed until the fall or Oct. 12, 1892. Hence, let us wait until that time. We fear however, that the selection of that day for a convention was again ill-chosen and a new postponement will be necessary. The convention was postponed from April 30 to October 12, because on April 30, a conclave of the Sons of the American Revolution was held, and many members of the League also belong to other organizations. Consequently, one of these conventions had to be set aside until a later date. On October 12, however, a great event will take place in Chicago: the dedication of the fair, a true commemoration of the four hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America.

    2

    Perhaps many members of the Liberty League will be obliged to participate in this national festivity in Chicago and perhaps another postponement will follow. Why do they select such unsuitable dates?

    The Zgoda press charges us for not greeting sincerely the newly published Telegraf. This charge is unjust. Our greeting was very cordial, and, whoever read it will admit it. The Latin saying at the outset, did not detract from the ensuing words that were truly sincere; it was only a very delicate reproach for impolite conduct toward us. We are not at fault if the Telegraf accepted our welcome with incredulity; it has noted deceit, Pharisaism and many other similar endearing qualities in our sayings. That is not our fault. Any impartial person will acknowledge justice on our part.

    We have finally received some information as to why the Liberty League gives no evidence of its presence. The "Zgoda" press offers an explanation to the answer of the Committee ...

    Polish
    I F 2, III B 4, II B 2 d 1