The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Times -- November 15, 1872
    [St. Stanislaus Association Has Anniversary]

    The seventh anniversary of the Polish Benevolent Association of St. Stanislaus Kostka occurred yesterday. At 1 A.M. a large concourse of our Polish citizens assembled at the church of the society on Milwaukee Ave. near Division St., where appropriate religious services were held. Father Juskeivitz officiated at the altar. A noteworthy feature was the fine orchestral music.

    In the afternoon the society met at the hall, corner of Noble and Bradley Sts., and took action on the organization of a central Polish-American committee. The Polish population of Chicago is quite large and the members are among the most thrifty and orderly of our citizens.

    The seventh anniversary of the Polish Benevolent Association of St. Stanislaus Kostka occurred yesterday. At 1 A.M. a large concourse of our Polish citizens assembled at the church of the ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II D 1
  • Zgoda -- January 12, 1887
    Attempts to Organize Polish Clubs and Societies in America

    Dear Editor:

    We hope that the writer of this article has in his heart some of the true feelings Polish people in this country received after reading his article. When I receive letters from different parts of our city, telling of organizing new church societies and political clubs, I am surprised that no attempts have been made to organize a Polish national club in our country for the benefit of all Polish people.

    Sooner or later all Polish immigrants in this country will concentrate on the organizing one big Polish club, which will take care of all Polish affairs pertaining to the welfare of the Polish immigrants in this country.

    It is assumed, that the Polish National Alliance will take full charge of this great movement, but the disinclined will have to change their attitude about this movement; otherwise it will be dropped because one club cannot take care of this alone without the support of all the Polish people.

    2

    This Polish national club will take the utmost interest in all Polish affairs and be of great help to the Polish immigrants.

    I haven't any doubt that no matter where we go this land of freedom will give the Polish people the opportunities they have been seeking.

    In about 30 or 50 years, the population of the Polish immigrants in this country will be a few millions. Our hardships in our native land, and our faith in the Lord are well known, but our main ambition won't be realized any too soon. Judging by our intentions and hard work, we have one thing that means everything to us, freedom.

    Let us always bear in mind that Poland was our native land, but now in the land of freedom, let us all learn to speak a new language, let us not lose faith that some day our native land will fight against its rulers and be a free country. Then we can return to her and have riches and good luck, which are awaiting us.

    3

    All this will not happen unless the poor class of people defy the treacherous rule of the rich. Before the rich will consent to this change and agree to be treated as equals with the poor, the blood of many patriots will flow in our native land.

    In this land of freedom we need many churches where we can receive our daily bread or communion, and we ask that all Polish people take part in this religious obligation, the same way as they have done in Poland.

    We should have a committee to see that the Polish children attend school, that they have books published at a reasonable price, have intelligent teachers, maintain and run the old schools, and build new schools, and organize Polish libraries in the neighborhoods inhabited mostly by Polish people.

    A committee of finance, consisting of trusted and intelligent men of high standing, should take it upon themselves to see that the Polish soldiers and the Polish churches are kept in the best of conditions.

    4

    I am interested in only one thing; that the Polish papers and the employees take the utmost care in publishing articles concerning the welfare of all Polish people. Almost daily we hear of Polish societies and churches being started, which is a good sign that soon we will be a strong group, united as one.

    Let this idea of unity remian deep in our hearts, so that the new Polish immigrants may profit by our sincere and hearty efforts. I hope the editor can place a few of these words in his paper.

    A. Patriofil.

    Dear Editor: We hope that the writer of this article has in his heart some of the true feelings Polish people in this country received after reading his article. When ...

    Polish
    III A, I E, I A 1 a, III C, III B 2
  • Zgoda -- January 26, 1887
    Slander

    There are many Americans who give our forefathers credit for their splendid support of the Catholic religion and their undying love for their native land.

    Not long ago something was said in regard to the above mentioned which caused hard feelings and misunderstanding among Polish people; we feel that it should be overlooked.

    American citizens attending the Polish National Alliance convention began collecting donations to support and maintain the academy and convent of the Ursulan Sisters. Donations were given good-heartedly.

    During a church mission in a small town near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a Polish Catholic priest, Father Koluszewski of Cleveland, ascended the pulpit and denounced sternly the donations given to support the "n Home."

    2

    "Who gave them permission," said the Reverend Father to the congregation, "to take care of the collections for the Ursulans? Do not believe them; they are liars, these Ursulans; they are a suspicious group of ladies. In the old country the devil sent women to do his bidding where he himself had failed."

    I will not say anything that you can hold against me but I will add this - that the reason for the sudden anger of Reverend Father Koluszewski against the Ursulans is that the Polish National Alliance of America is taking care of the donations for the Ursulans and is being fully supported by its 3,000 members and by different societies and Catholic institutions.

    Reverend Father Koluszewski is himself working against the Polish National Alliance; he cannot understand how an organization as big as the P. N. A. can undertake so great a responsibility and still have so many Roman Catholic priests striving for an opportunity to join it.

    Reverend Koluszewski's speech from the pulpit only caused the people to 3leave in great anger; it caused ill feeling among the P. N. A. members because they were willing to contribute to the support of poor Ursulan Sisters' Convent.

    Another priest said: "As a priest, I am humiliated at the sudden outburst of Reverend Father Koluszerski; as a Pole, I cannot find words to apoligize for his behavior. I know that from our native country the poorest class of people crossed the ocean in search of a country where they could be taken care of in their old age, as for example, the Home of the Ursulan Sisters. This institution is also striving to save our children from the shame put upon their souls because of the lack of education. They are working to teach our Polish children the success and pleasures of life received from having a good education and from the teachings of the Catholic religion.

    It also shows in old records that the head of this institution, Superior Sister Morawska, donated her farm and all her money in her home town of Poland for the building of this home, Ursulan Sisters. This shows that any propaganda or slander said against these "Sisters" is only used as an obstruction against the Polish people in their effort to advance and their 4undying love for the Catholic religion.

    Almighty God will punish the trouble-maker who spoke so rudely about the Ursulan Sisters and their undying love for the Catholic religion.

    Dr. Rev. Father Kanonik.

    There are many Americans who give our forefathers credit for their splendid support of the Catholic religion and their undying love for their native land. Not long ago something was ...

    Polish
    III C, I A 2 a, II D 5, III B 2, I K, III B 4, I A 2 c
  • Zgoda -- December 05, 1888
    Organization of Mieczystaw

    A newly organized club of National Polish Artisans of King Mieczystaw I held its meeting the 18th of November at the hall of Mr. Albert Kowalski, on the corner of Noble Street and Milwaukee Avenue.

    At first they read the constitution, its aims, and the future of this newly organized club, and then they invited the president of the N. P. A., Mr. Osucha, to be their speaker.

    Mr. Osucha, taking the stand, expressed his gratification that brothers joining the new organization understood its qualities, its merits, and the importance of it to the Polish National Alliance, and so every one expressed the feeling of readiness in joining this alliance.

    The National Alliance, he said, labors for the nation and so expressed itself in its constitution. Under the banner of the organization we can work without fear. Our work is open and so our aim to be larger and better needs your support. Here in America we have freedom, and so for this reason we should take advantage of it by giving our nation the greatest support.

    A newly organized club of National Polish Artisans of King Mieczystaw I held its meeting the 18th of November at the hall of Mr. Albert Kowalski, on the corner of ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II A 1
  • Zgoda -- March 13, 1889
    Polish Falcons

    The gymnastic education society entitled "Polish-American Falcons" was organized with the intention of affording to the Polish youth an opportunity to educate themselves mentally and develop physically.

    It is well known, dear fellow men, that the above mentioned society has now and will have the following aims:

    First, to lend a helping hand whenever needed and to live in peace amongst ourselves like brothers. To join with other organizations, like the Polish National Alliance, and by it help to build a Polish hall here in Chicago.

    Second, to produce Polish theatricals, recitals, concerts, etc., as by this alone we shall obstruct the path to evil into which our youth might fall. So for this reason I make a plea to our friends, especially to the Polish youth, to join our Polish-American Falcons' organization, and by working together we will show other nationalities that our Polish mother doesn't 2need to be ashamed of her children.

    So come young and old to our meetings that take place every first Sunday of the month at 2 o'clock in the afternoon in the hall of Mr. Nalepinski, at Noble and Chopin street.

    As to the question of building a Polish hall, it could be accomplished in a short while.

    The gymnastic education society entitled "Polish-American Falcons" was organized with the intention of affording to the Polish youth an opportunity to educate themselves mentally and develop physically. It is well ...

    Polish
    III E, II B 1 a, II B 1 c 3, II E 3, III B 2, II B 3
  • Zgoda -- June 30, 1889
    To the Polish Singers of America

    Poles scattered in this American land, are devoting their time and talent to various pursuits. Other nationalities, seeing us busy like ants, admit that we are also people, and have strength, a soul, and possess a great ability, sometimes even greater than theirs. We can convince ourselves with facts that we hold great interest in all branches of industry and in numerous events. In order to continue to aid ourselves morally and materially, the Poles have built and continue building churches, schools, establishing various public and church organizations, also the necessary activities in singing.

    What is dearer to a person if not a song? How wonderful it is sometimes to watch in the early morning the lark ascending to the heavens and its Creator, singing a hymn of adoration and praise. In watching a thing of this sort, does it not urge every person to confine his thoughts and heart to God? If not, well, an evil one knows nothing of a song. Our Polish anthems, like every other branch of arts, had difficulties in staying on their feet, or one might say "tracks." We saw how the organizations of singers rose and fell, frequently from the lack of support, or from lack of funds and Polish tunes.

    2

    Everything was quiet, as if everybody was sleeping. It looked as if the Poles did not know how to sing.

    It was quiet and sad -- until a few years ago a couple of these organizations, which were subject to the feeling of failure, re-organized themselves on a new and stronger foundation and created "The Organization of Polish Singers in America." This was started and did not lack strength because there is plenty of it, especially upon this large American land, if only every one wanted to sincerely help and lend a helping hand and work for the benefit of this organization. Our aim is:

    To rise, and wake the nation's soul by our Polish song, to acquaint the nation with the creations of our artists, as on an occasion held before on the first concert that had taken place in Chicago in the month of May 1889. Another aim is to be supporters for these new creations pertaining to music, by donations and increasing our fund for this aim.

    So for this reason, then, our organization of Polish singers in America requests all other existing organizations to join us and work together, bringing praise to the Polish names. As for others, who do not yet belong to any such kind of an organization, and feel capable of singing, should join an existing singers organization, and help aid together this one large Polish Singers' Organization in America.

    3

    At the first concert sponsored by Organized Polish Singers of America, held in Chicago, there were represented three choirs: The Chopin Singers' Organization as the first; the Harmonia Organized Singers as second; and the Z. S. P. Choir from Milwaukee as third.

    Which organization shall be the fourth choir? We hope that in the future gathering of singers in Milwaukee, there will be at least ten choirs represented.

    Poles scattered in this American land, are devoting their time and talent to various pursuits. Other nationalities, seeing us busy like ants, admit that we are also people, and have ...

    Polish
    II B 1 a, III B 2
  • Zgoda -- April 16, 1890
    Blessing of the Banner

    Please place this correspondence news in your Zgoda. The members of the St. Stephen Society, at the parish of St. Stanislaus, celebrated the commemoration of a beautiful Polish banner, Easter Sunday, at the expense of $600.

    The Society of St. Stephan has been organized over a year ago,and the number of members is increasing nicely. Today we have 290 members. Many of the other societies of this parish took part in this great celebration.

    At 9 o'clock, Easter morning, the procession started; the Society of St. Stanislaus came first because it is the oldest society of this parish, second came the Society of St. Casimir; third, the Society of St. Adelbert; fourth, the Society of St. Valentine; fifth, the Society of St. John Kantego; sixth, the Society of St. Stephan.

    These different societies paraded through the streets to the music 2supplied by the Society of St. Stanislaus, and returned to the church where a church mass was given, followed by a mass meeting in the church auditorium, where speeches by the Rev. Fathers and prominent leaders of Polish enterprises, were heard. The choir of St. Stanislaus sang songs, accompanied by a Polish orchestra. After the speeches, the societies marched through the streets with this new banner at the head of the parade, and many thousands of Polish people took part in the great ceremonies.

    The reverend Fathers and the committee in charge of this celebration take this opportunity to thank one and all for their splendid cooperation.

    St. Sierszulski, Sec. of St. Stephan Society.

    Please place this correspondence news in your Zgoda. The members of the St. Stephen Society, at the parish of St. Stanislaus, celebrated the commemoration of a beautiful Polish banner, Easter ...

    Polish
    III C, III B 2, III B 3 b, I B 4
  • Zgoda -- December 10, 1890
    Proclamation to National Societies in Chicago

    Dear Fellow Citizens:

    About ten years ago the Harmony Society of Chicago sent notice that in order to preserve the language of our forefathers they demanded the building of a Polish library.

    The Harmony Society sent letters to all Polish societies and organizations to join with us, to help support, upkeep and to enrich this library. Only few societies were interested in this undertaking. They donated money and elected the officers. In their constitution they resolved that this library be made free to all our fellow citizens, and to the Polish people interested in supporting a library of this kind. In a short time whether due to lack of money or for other reasons the societies withdrew, leaving the upkeep of this library upon the shoulders of the Harmony Society, and the Society of Teachers. Shortly afterwards the Society of Teachers withdrew, leaving the Harmony Society the sole means of support for this library. The kind of support given this library by our society in the last few years can be ascertained by examing our books. The newest and best books obtainable written by prominent Polish poets and writers can also be obtained from the secretary. Today the library numbers nearly 1,500 volumes.

    2

    To this day the library is and will continue to be the property of the Harmony Society. There is a clause in the constitution stating that when times are better and the people show more interest in supporting an institution of this kind, the Harmony Society will permit other Polish societies to join and help enlarge and enrich this library.

    In the last ten years since this library was established, many new societies were organized which could help continue this library. Even the P. N. A. at the last meeting, held in November has taken steps with the aid of the Harmony Society, to open its own Polish library.

    For nearly one hundred thousand Polish people in our city, we should have at least one good library in a beautiful building, with books of the best and highest quality. But one society such as the Harmony, cannot take care of so great an undertaking. Therefore we are asking you with the permission of the officers. Do you, dear fellow citizens, want to work hand in hand in supporting, upkeeping and enriching the Polish library in Chicago? Do you want to take care of it, own it and add to the financial needs of this library? The cost of the upkeep is not very high. It is up to you to donate whatever you can. We suggest that each society interested in this send two or three delegates to the special meeting to be held Sunday evening, January 11,1891 at Nalepinski's Hall.

    3

    There it can be decided whether the societies are in favor of one big library or whether each society will organize and maintain a library of their own.

    At this meeting a new constitution will be written to be used by all libraries whether united as one or under their own separate ownership. A central group of officers will be elected, a librarian or librarians to be selected from the best men obtainable, through the aid and votes of all the present delegates. All delegates chosen to represent their group, please be present.

    Harmony Society of Chicago

    M. Rzeszotarski, President

    J. Olbinski, Secretary

    Dear Fellow Citizens: About ten years ago the Harmony Society of Chicago sent notice that in order to preserve the language of our forefathers they demanded the building of a ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 1 d, II B 2 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 22, 1890
    Polish Activity in Chicago

    We are glad to hear that the Poles are developing a practical side to their nature. They need it in this country. This new spirit is shown by the newly organized Polish Hunters' Club in Chicago. The purpose of the club is to provide necessary conveniences for its members; such as, arranging for hunting excursions, buying railroad fare tickets at reduced rates, purchasing of ammunition at low cost, finding suitable locations for hunting, and other functions. The members expect a 66% reduction on the railroad fare alone.

    Every member of the club is obliged to buy at least two shares from any building and loan association. These shares will remain the private property of the members, however, they may be used as security for buying real estate or other tangible property for the club, when the special 2consent of the members of the club is given. The initiation fee is only $1.00 and the membership dues are ten cents per month.

    Other necessary information can be obtained from Mr. Durski, the secretary of the club, 662 Noble St., who accepts new members. Later on, we will inform our readers about new developments of the club.

    We are glad to hear that the Poles are developing a practical side to their nature. They need it in this country. This new spirit is shown by the newly ...

    Polish
    II B 3, III B 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 06, 1891
    Poles Will Open a New Hall

    The new Polish hall at St. Stanislaus Parish building is almost completed and will be opened next Sunday at 7:30 P.M.

    This great event will be celebrated with the presentation of a great Polish play, written by W. X. K. Kozlowski, and based on the last Polish insurrection against Russia.

    The play is a tragic drama of difficult execution, but the amateurs who will take part in it are well-known for their ability and we are confident that it will satisfy the public.

    The stage, which is beautifully decorated, has been arranged by stage experts from the Chicago Grand Opera House.

    The scenery on the main curtain is taken from the painting of Elias, and it represents Muscovites shooting at people coming out of a church. The other 2scenes are also very beautiful and artistic. Their perspective is such as to give a perfect impression of distance. This impression is so realistic that many persons have asked why such a big hall has been built in the back of the old one.

    The reserved seats are only 35 cents; others 25 cents; children half the price.

    Remember that this play is presented for the benefit of the parish choir the Polish Cadets, and the Polish Knights.

    Tickets for this play are worth at least a dollar apiece, but the committee desires to have a large audience. Let every one see this play and thus encourage those who devote their time and energy disinterestedly. Remember that the parish choir works not only for the glory of God but also for the honor of the parish and your pleasure.

    The Cadets of Saint Stanislaus work also disinterestedly.

    The Knights have neither income nor privileges of any kind, on the contrary, 3all they have is lots of trouble and expenses. Hurrah! Long live the parish choir! Long live the Cadets! Long live the Knights of the Polish Queen's Crown!

    The new Polish hall at St. Stanislaus Parish building is almost completed and will be opened next Sunday at 7:30 P.M. This great event will be celebrated with the presentation ...

    Polish
    III B 2, III A, III C, II B 1 c 1