The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Zgoda -- January 26, 1887
    Slander

    There are many Americans who give our forefathers credit for their splendid support of the Catholic religion and their undying love for their native land.

    Not long ago something was said in regard to the above mentioned which caused hard feelings and misunderstanding among Polish people; we feel that it should be overlooked.

    American citizens attending the Polish National Alliance convention began collecting donations to support and maintain the academy and convent of the Ursulan Sisters. Donations were given good-heartedly.

    During a church mission in a small town near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a Polish Catholic priest, Father Koluszewski of Cleveland, ascended the pulpit and denounced sternly the donations given to support the "n Home."

    2

    "Who gave them permission," said the Reverend Father to the congregation, "to take care of the collections for the Ursulans? Do not believe them; they are liars, these Ursulans; they are a suspicious group of ladies. In the old country the devil sent women to do his bidding where he himself had failed."

    I will not say anything that you can hold against me but I will add this - that the reason for the sudden anger of Reverend Father Koluszewski against the Ursulans is that the Polish National Alliance of America is taking care of the donations for the Ursulans and is being fully supported by its 3,000 members and by different societies and Catholic institutions.

    Reverend Father Koluszewski is himself working against the Polish National Alliance; he cannot understand how an organization as big as the P. N. A. can undertake so great a responsibility and still have so many Roman Catholic priests striving for an opportunity to join it.

    Reverend Koluszewski's speech from the pulpit only caused the people to 3leave in great anger; it caused ill feeling among the P. N. A. members because they were willing to contribute to the support of poor Ursulan Sisters' Convent.

    Another priest said: "As a priest, I am humiliated at the sudden outburst of Reverend Father Koluszerski; as a Pole, I cannot find words to apoligize for his behavior. I know that from our native country the poorest class of people crossed the ocean in search of a country where they could be taken care of in their old age, as for example, the Home of the Ursulan Sisters. This institution is also striving to save our children from the shame put upon their souls because of the lack of education. They are working to teach our Polish children the success and pleasures of life received from having a good education and from the teachings of the Catholic religion.

    It also shows in old records that the head of this institution, Superior Sister Morawska, donated her farm and all her money in her home town of Poland for the building of this home, Ursulan Sisters. This shows that any propaganda or slander said against these "Sisters" is only used as an obstruction against the Polish people in their effort to advance and their 4undying love for the Catholic religion.

    Almighty God will punish the trouble-maker who spoke so rudely about the Ursulan Sisters and their undying love for the Catholic religion.

    Dr. Rev. Father Kanonik.

    There are many Americans who give our forefathers credit for their splendid support of the Catholic religion and their undying love for their native land. Not long ago something was ...

    Polish
    III C, I A 2 c, III B 4, I K, III B 2, II D 5, I A 2 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 07, 1892
    Father Barzynski Feted

    A birthday reception was given to Father Vinnent Barzynski at St. Stanislaus' parish by some of the outstanding parishioners last Tuesday. The purpose of the affair was to show the pastor the gratitude of the people for his untiring work done for the parish, and the Polish people at large.

    The school children's choir, under the able guidance of Szczesny Zahajkiewicz, presented a short musical sketch. Those in attendance had the privilege of witnessing an original creation by one of the school children. In many instances throughout the play, unusual talent of the boy was brought out. The action, the dialogue, and even the theme, showed interesting original creative ability. If the boy is tutored along the right directions, without doubt, he will bring honor to the Poles of Chicago.

    2

    During the course of the dinner, the toastmaster, Father K. Domagalski expressed the wished of the entire assemblage by extending Father Barzynski heartfelt birthday felicitations. The pastor in turn thanked the assembled friends, and wished them many years of happiness.

    After a short solemn speech by the celebrant, City Treasurer Kiolbassa took the stand. He gave a short history of the parish and presented a picture of the work accomplished by Father Barzynski for the parish, for the Poles in Chicago, and for the Poles in America. Peter Kiolbassa, as a representative of the Polish people, wished the pastor continued health and happiness and many years of active life.

    3

    The pastor's earnestness in his work was shown three times at the reception. He received three calls during the course of the evening. Each time he rose from the table to handle the situation personally, never delaying the business until after the termination of the birthday reception.

    After the dinner, three children of St. Stanislaus Kostki's school, gave recitations in honor of the pastor. They were tutored by Leon Machnikowski.

    This completed the reception here. The entire assemblage left to visit the Holy Family Orphanage. Under the able guidance of the Notre Dame Sisters, the children gave a varied program of entertainment to the visitors. A mixed choir sang a number of songs, Polish and English dialogues were 4rendered also. The unfortunate children virtually called Father Barzynski their father, for his constant attention has given them moral, spiritual, and material help. Although many of the waifs entered the orphanage shabbily garbed, their attire at this occasion showed no sign of neglect. Their trim appearance was a good indication of the efforts of Father Barzynski. It should be noted that it was through the hard work of the pastor and his influence over pastors of other Polish churches that made this orphanage a possibility.

    The conclusion of the introductory entertainment introduced the gymnastic drill exercises of the children. Though commanded by a nun, a person familiar with military drills would envy these children as they executed each order. The highlight of the exercises was the sensational marching of a four year old boy.

    5

    At the conclusion, the originator of the Holy Family Orphanage showed his honored guests about the entire building. Many expressed wonderment of the fine layout.

    Their reaction was a fine example, for it definitely showed how the contributions have been expended. No doubt was left in their minds about the efficiency of handling the funds.

    A birthday reception was given to Father Vinnent Barzynski at St. Stanislaus' parish by some of the outstanding parishioners last Tuesday. The purpose of the affair was to show the ...

    Polish
    IV, II D 5, II D 6
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 23, 1894
    Outline of the Constitution of the Polish League in the United States, to Be Discussed at the Kosciusko Mass Meeting on May 8, 1894

    [Translator's note: This constitution was adopted with a few changes.]

    Article I

    1. The Polish League is to represent all Poles in the United States of America. Its purpose is to unite all Poles in the name of Christian love and love for Poland, so that they may uplift themselves by engaging collectively in benevolent, educational, and patriotic work. The Polish League--as a combination of moral and physical forces the purpose of which is to promote an interest in nationalistic work--is to be a fraternal alliance standing above all factions.

    2. The object of the Polish League is to defend, support, and foster the Polish 2national cause by open and legal means. The expression "Polish national cause" is understood to include the civil, political, and national rights of the Poles and such tasks as teaching the Polish language, educating the Poles, [preserving Polish] customs, promoting unity, teaching the history of our nation, promoting the development of national characteristics, and, finally, working for the prosperity [of the Poles]

    3. The purpose of the Polish League may be summed up as follows:

    a. To look after the interests of American Poles in an honest manner, especially, in the presence of public opinion.

    b. To promote education by means of books, schools, and publications.

    c. To keep the Poles morally united in a brotherly spirit through mutual and moral influences.

    3

    d. To keep in contact with the mother country--both economically and intellectually.

    e. To improve our material condition through the organization of all kinds of institutions for mutual help.

    f. To help the weak and the poor.

    g. To collect money in America for the Polish National Fund.

    4. The Polish League shall never engage, either directly or indirectly, in any activity against the Holy Roman Catholic Faith or the principles of Christian morality set forth by the Church.

    5. Polish priests, who, through their calling, are engaged in teaching Christian love toward the mother country among the people, especially the youth, 4will have the right to voice their opinions at mass meetings and sessions of the League. They also will have the right of representation in its administration.

    6. Persons belonging to secret societies or organizations condemned by the Church cannot belong to the League. Anarchists, communists, and socialists shall be excluded from the League.

    Article II

    Organization of the Polish League

    1. The Polish League in the United States of America will be a federation.

    2. The League will embrace all Polish communities, parishes, societies, and organizations. Every Polish community, parish, society, or organization will have the right of representation at mass meetings, and in general it will have 5the right to control the affairs of the League in proportion to the number of members from whom it collects and pays a one-cent per capita assessment toward the Polish National Fund.

    3. No community, parish, or organization will lose its autonomy by joining the League. However, they will take upon themselves an obligation to work for the good of the Polish nation under the direction of the Polish League.

    4. Every large Polish community will constitute a district, which will be in charge of a district commission consisting of a president, two vice-presidents, a secretary, and a collector.

    5. District commission will begin to function as soon as they are approved by the League.

    6. If necessary, in order to facilitate its work or enlarge its field of action, 6every district commission can establish agencies and supervise them.

    7. Agencies will be under the district commissions and their personnel will consist of a manager, a secretary, and a collector.

    8. Agencies are nucleuses in direct contact with the Polish people. Their duties will be to promote education and patriotism by means of meetings, speeches, lectures; to enroll new members; to collect special dues and donations for the League; to send these funds to the district commissions, and to carry out all orders given by the district commissions.

    9. Duties of the district commissions:

    a. To see that the orders and decisions of the central board of the League are carried out.

    b. To collect dues in the district.

    7

    c. To inform the central board as to the needs of the district and see to it that the aims of the League are realized in their localities.

    d. To keep proper records.

    10. Collectors are to send accumulated funds at least once a month. When the sum collected exceeds twenty-five dollars, it must be sent at once.

    11. Rules and regulations in regard to the activities of the district commissions and the manner in which they will communicate with other departments will be issued by the central board from time to time.

    Article III

    Financial Organization

    1. The funds of the League are derived:

    a. From the one-cent monthly special assessment imposed upon every member of 8the League. Income from this assessment is to be set aside for the Polish National Fund.

    b. From voluntary monthly contributions and other donations.

    2. Societies, organizations, parishes, and communities shall collect from their members the one-cent special assessment and other contributions. The money thus collected shall be delivered to the local agencies, which shall send it to the district commissions.

    3. The district commissions shall deliver all collected funds to the financial secretary of the League, who will turn them over to the treasurer.

    4. Allocation of the League's funds:

    a. The one-cent special assessment collected from the members of the League is 9to be set aside exclusively for the Polish National Fund of the Polish League.

    b. All administrative and departmental expenses must be covered by voluntary contributions.

    5. Care of the funds:

    a. The control of the League's funds, and the issuing of yearly statements, etc., shall be under an executive committee of the League, according to the decision at the mass meeting.

    b. The League's funds shall be entrusted to the treasurer of the League.

    c. Rules and regulations governing the treasury will be prepared by a special committee, which will be chosen at the mass meeting.

    10

    Article IV

    The Polish National Fund

    1. Aim and purpose. The Polish National Fund shall be maintained by voluntary contributions for the purpose of supporting the Polish national cause and the Polish national movement in an endeavor to gain the independence and national rights of Poland.

    2. The object of the Polish National Fund shall be:

    a. To inculcate the principle of self-reliance among the Poles.

    b. To accustom the Polish public to the duty of making contributions toward the national cause.

    c. To provide funds for nationalistic work.

    3. The Polish National Fund shall embrace all funds set aside for nationalistic 11work, regardless of source, as provided by the regulations.

    4. Safeguarding the funds. The money of the Polish National Fund shall be invested in United States bonds.

    5. Protection and control. The Polish National Fund shall be guarded and protected by trustees.

    6. These trustees shall be chosen at the mass meeting and shall consist of trustworthy citizens financially responsible.

    7. The trustees shall have the right to check the funds and examine the financial records of the League at any time. They shall issue quarterly financial statements.

    8. Disposition of the Polish National Fund. The Polish National Fund shall be 12inviolable, its interest as well as the principal, until it reaches the sum of $100,000.

    9. As soon as the Fund reaches $100,000, the interest of the previous year is subject to disposition. The one-cent assessment collected from members shall be continued and added to the Fund.

    10. The problem of the disposition of the Polish National Fund shall be settled at the mass meeting, and the administration of the League, consisting of trustworthy men, shall dispose of it in accordance with the decision reached at the mass meeting.

    Article V

    The Legislative Power

    1. The legislative power is vested in the conventions of the League.

    2. Conventions shall be held every three years at the location chosen by a 13majority of the district commissions six months before they are scheduled to take place. Special conventions may be called by two thirds of the votes of district presidents.

    3. The conventions of the Polish League shall be attended by delegates from Polish communities, parishes, organizations, and societies, in the proportion of one delegate for every one hundred members paying the one-cent special assessment to the League in their respective parishes, organizations, or societies. A community or society with less than one hundred members shall be entitled to send one delegate.

    4. Delegates to the conventions of the Polish League shall be chosen from among pastors of Polish parishes or their assistants, and also from among editors of Polish newspapers in America, who work in the spirit of the League.

    5. The by-laws of the League and the outline of its activities shall be made 14at the conventions.

    6. The officers of the League shall be chosen at the conventions.

    7. All basic problems of the League shall be decided at the conventions.

    8. Rules and regulations for conducting the conventions and for the election of officers shall be prepared by a committee chosen and approved at the last two conventions.

    Article VI

    Executive Department of the League

    1. The central board of the Polish League shall consist of a president, two vice-presidents, a secretary, a treasurer, and ten directors, four of whom must be officers of the central board.

    2. The central board is the executive branch of the Polish League and shall 15attend to all activities of the League, such as protection of Polish immigrants, welfare work, internal and external activities of the League, Polish National Fund and its problems, organization and control of departments, districts, and agencies.

    3. As to immigration, the central board shall endeavor to aid Polish immigrants by protecting them against exploitation and, if possible, by securing them employment. It is also its duty to inform prospective immigrants about conditions in America and the difficulties of traveling, through special appeals and warnings in Polish newspapers published in Europe. In general, the central board shall work for the welfare of Polish immigrants as circumstances will permit.

    4. As to welfare work, the central board shall support all Polish benevolent institutions, such as orphanages, homes for the aged, hospitals, etc.

    5. As to its internal activities, the League will endeavor:

    16

    a. To unite all Poles, reconciling those who are at odds with one another and reproving professional slanderers and intrigants who disrupt national unity.

    b. To defend the honor and the rights of American Poles by legal, verbal, and written means.

    c. To warn our public against wicked and harmful elements.

    d. To voice publicly matters which concern American Poles.

    e. To inform American Poles about the League's affairs, their civic duties, and about the benefits derived by performing them.

    5. As to its external activities, the League will endeavor to keep in spiritual contact with the mother country, creating sympathy here for our oppressed countrymen and helping them by all means in emergencies.

    17

    Article VII

    1. The central board of the Polish League will organize and control two permanent departments, namely, the Educational Department and the Welfare Department.

    2. The Educational and Welfare departments shall consist of five members each, namely, a president, two vice-presidents, a recording secretary, and a financial secretary.

    3. The duties of the Educational Department shall be:

    a. To promote education in the Polish schools by standardizing their educational system and textbooks.

    b. To publish inexpensive books suitable for the common people, establish reading rooms, libraries, trade schools, and hold public lectures.

    18

    c. To settle all personal disputes that may arise in the League by arbitration or honor courts.

    4. The duties of the Welfare Department shall be:

    a. To interest the Poles in agriculture; b. to organize the workingmen; c. to establish employment offices; d. to encourage Polish business.

    5. All decisions made by these departments shall be approved by the central board of the League before they may be carried out.

    6. Every member of the central board must furnish a bond, the amount of which shall be decided at the convention. This shall apply also to the members of the League's treasury.

    7. No officer of the League shall receive any remuneration for his services.

    19

    8. Office expenses of the League shall be paid from its funds.

    9. The problem of investing the League's funds and securing a charter for it will be entrusted to competent experts of this country.

    10. The central board of the League will determine the rules and regulations to be followed by district commissions and agencies.

    11. All members of the central board, departments, district commissions, and agencies must be Poles who are citizens of the United States (or at least they must have first papers). They must be patriotic, moral, and of good character and have an unblemished past.

    (Editor's note: The foregoing outline of the constitution of the Polish League, which we have the honor of presenting to the Polish public in the United States, is nothing else but the material that will be submitted for consideration at 20the Kosciusko mass meeting. Whether this outline will be accepted, rejected or changed, wholly or in part, depends on the mass meeting, that is, on the delegates legally chosen by the Polish people in the United States of America.)

    [Translator's note: This constitution was adopted with a few changes.] Article I 1. The Polish League is to represent all Poles in the United States of America. Its purpose is ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 2 g, I A 1 a, II D 10, II D 8, II D 5, II D 4, II D 1, III H, III G, III C, I L, I E

    Card Images

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- August 18, 1894
    Polish Roman Catholic Union and the Coming Convention (Editorial)

    The convention of the Polish Roman Catholic Union in America will be opened Tuesday, August 14, in Cleveland.

    The Polish Roman Catholic Union in America is a very large Catholic and national institution. It has almost ten thousand members; it supports hundreds of orphans and widows and unites the large masses of the Polish people in America into one great family. Therefore we ought to wish this institution success at its convention and in the future.

    The statement for the fiscal year of 1893-1894, which will be distributed at the convention in Cleveland, shows that the institution is in very good 2condition.

    Right after the Chicago convention the organization had 9,250 members, and at the present moment it has 9,270.

    The income for the last fiscal year (1893-1894) was $81,705.39, and the expenditures were $81,461.77. The cash balance is $5,269.72.

    The unpaid dues of the societies are only $2,529.95.

    The income for the last fiscal year was as follows: assessments, $79,178.14; monthly dues, $1,696.00; initiation fees, $440.50; net income from Wiara I. Ojczyzna [the organ of the Union], $265.75; interest on assets, $120.00.

    The expense column shows the following items: death benefits to eighty-two widowers, $24,350.00; to eighty-four widows, $49,900.00; total death benefits, 3$74,250.00; Wiara I Ojczyzna, $5,018.65; Polish Immigration Home, $300.00; and Polish Pavilion at Lwow, $300.00. The rest is administration and office expenses.

    The assessments were $9.90 per member.

    The special statement for Wiara I Ojczyzna for the last eleven months shows subscriptions, $5,073.58; advertisements, $711.85; expenses, $5,253.92; net profit, $531.51. According to the agreement with the Polish Publishing Company the organization receives half the profit, or $265.75.

    So much for the figures. From this statement, the following deductions may be made. Despite the separatist movements in various cities, such as Detroit and Bay City, Michigan, the number of the members was not diminished. The dues and assessments do not exceed ten dollars a year per member, which is comparatively low. The indebtedness of the societies for unpaid dues is very small. The administrative expenses, including salaries paid, do not exceed fifteen hundred 4dollars a year; that is, they are not too high. The reserve capital draws interest.

    The organ [Wiara I Ojczyzna] of the Polish Roman Catholic Union instead of showing a deficit, as is generally the case in such organizations, yields a profit.

    Finally, in the last year our institution assisted 166 Polish families by paying death benefits.

    It may be said with confidence that these results are highly satisfactory. They prove that, thanks to the good management of the administration, there are order and economy in the institution; in short, that it is a financial success. The donations to the Polish Immigration Home and to the Polish Pavilion at Lwow testify that the Union is also interested in Polish affairs.

    The foregoing facts indicate that the future of this institution is assured, 5and that the next convention cannot be anything but a success.

    That there are good and bad people everywhere is a fact, and it is also true that in the Polish Roman Catholic Union there is a handful of Poles who during the whole year tried to sow dissension in this organization by means of a newspaper published in Winona, Minnesota. However, their intrigues are shattered against [the wall of] facts and figures.

    The convention may make some changes in the structure of the Union. Wiara I Ojczyzna, organ of the organization, has published a series of suggestions on that subject. Some members propose that the conventions shall be held less rarely; others desire that the administration shall be centralized in one locality; a certain group desires to make changes in the death-benefit system; and so on. We shall see how these matters are decided at the convention.

    We believe that the convention will be guided by common sense and justice, and 6that it will not make any radical changes in the present system which might undermine and weaken the stability of the Polish Roman Catholic Union and cause misunderstandings. We believe that it will consider the interests of all Polish settlements, and that every settlement will be fairly treated.

    The convention of the Polish Roman Catholic Union in America will be opened Tuesday, August 14, in Cleveland. The Polish Roman Catholic Union in America is a very large Catholic ...

    Polish
    II D 1, III B 4, II D 10, II D 5
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 23, 1896
    Polish Catholic Orphanage and Home for the Aged

    A very important project having to do with the establishment of an orphanage and home for the aged, has been under discussion by a number of prominent Poles of our community and other sections of Chicago. Everybody realizes how useful and important such an institution would be.

    Of course, a lot of money, as well as the co-operation of all Poles, is necessary to make this project possible. We surely ought to be able to supply the one and the other.

    At present the project is just in the preparatory stage. Further details will be given at the proper time.

    Here we wish to remark that Avondale is an ideal site for a home for the aged and the Orphans, and that incorporation papers have already been secured in 2in Springfield, Illinois.

    The charter is in the name of "Polish Catholic Home For the Aged and Disabled"--a philanthropic institution.

    The incorporators are Peter Kiolbassa, C. J. Bielinski, Albert Jedrzejek, Reverend Vincent Barzynski, John Gniot, J. Dombrowski and T. Krolik. The names themselves are sufficient proof that the project is in competent hands.

    A very important project having to do with the establishment of an orphanage and home for the aged, has been under discussion by a number of prominent Poles of our ...

    Polish
    II D 4, II D 5, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 06, 1897
    Home for the Aged and the Crippled

    The home for the crippled [St. Joseph's Home for the Aged, now at 2650 North Ridgeway Avenue--legal title, Franciscan Sisters of St. Kunegunda], which is being built under the direction of a special committee, is to have its roof completed this week. With the help of God it is hoped that pleasant weather will prevail, so that by Christmas the aged poor and infirm may be placed.

    Through the quiet work and contributions of the Young Ladies' Sodality and other groups of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish, a great beginning has been made in making the erection of this building possible. With the aid of all Polish societies and people, it is hoped that this home will be not only completed but also paid for.

    The greatest portion of the money has thus far come from the Young Ladies' Sodality, which gave over two thousand dollars; the Women's Sodality gave over a thousand; and five hundred was collected from the people.

    2

    These initial contributions have made it possible to pay for one third of the cost. It is anticipated that the Poles of Chicago will realize the need and purpose of such an institution and will give wholehearted support to the organizations that have made this possible.

    In the name of The Committee,

    John Gniot

    Peter Kiolbassa

    The home for the crippled [St. Joseph's Home for the Aged, now at 2650 North Ridgeway Avenue--legal title, Franciscan Sisters of St. Kunegunda], which is being built under the direction ...

    Polish
    II D 5, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 27, 1897
    Polish Old People's Home Gets Help

    The Young Ladies Sodality of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish has donated ten dollars for the St. Joseph Old People's Home. Sincere thanks are extended the donors.

    Sisters of St. Francis

    The Young Ladies Sodality of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish has donated ten dollars for the St. Joseph Old People's Home. Sincere thanks are extended the donors. Sisters of St. Francis

    Polish
    II D 5
  • Narod Polski -- January 05, 1898
    Polish Immigration Home

    Polish people wishing to purchase passports to travel to Poland, or from Poland to America, can receive all proper information, dates and time schedules from the Mother Superior of the Felician Sisters,

    3 Morris Street, New York City, N. Y.

    This Immigration Home also takes care of Polish People who are old and are not in the position to take care of themselves financially; therefore, the Felician Sisters ask that people wishing to travel will, please, join as members at the monthly rate of $2.00; this money is to be used solely for the upkeep and sole support of the aged.

    The officers in charge of this Polish organization are:-

    Father Stanley Szymanowski President
    Father B. Gramlewicz Vice President
    Father Dr. J. Dworzak Sec'y. of Finance
    Father Stanley Nowak Recording Secretary
    Father Dr. Dworzah Chaplain
    2

    All money orders and checks should be sent to the "Polish Immigration Home," care of Dr. J. Dworzak, Williamsbridge, New York.

    Polish people wishing to purchase passports to travel to Poland, or from Poland to America, can receive all proper information, dates and time schedules from the Mother Superior of the ...

    Polish
    III G, II D 5, II D 6
  • Zgoda -- March 05, 1903
    Meeting

    On Friday, the 6th of March 1903, in the home of the Polish National Alliance, 102-104 W. Division Street, at the hour of 7:30 P. M., there will be a meeting of the committee erecting a home for the aged and crippled.

    On this meeting the chairman will state a delivered opinion of Mr. Cumings, the lawyer representing the Polish National Alliance in the affairs of erecting this structure.

    On Friday, the 6th of March 1903, in the home of the Polish National Alliance, 102-104 W. Division Street, at the hour of 7:30 P. M., there will be a ...

    Polish
    II D 5
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 26, 1908
    New Home of the Good Shepherd

    In spite of the intolerable rain yesterday afternoon about 8,000 people from various sections of our city gathered to witness the consecration of the cornerstone for the new home of the Good Shepherd, to be located at Grace St. and Racine Avenue.

    A big parade of different Catholic societies and organizations presided at the consecration ceremonials, mainly the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters and the Ancient Order of Hibernians. They met at 9:30 A. M. at the corner of Clark and Grace and paraded to await the arrival of His Excellency Archbishop J. E. Quigley. Before the parade and Archbishop J. E. Quigley returned to the scene of the consecration it was 4 o'clock in the afternoon.

    The consecration ceremonies were performed by Archbishop Quigley, with the assistance of Rev. Father P. C. Conway as first deacon. Rev. Father J.M. Scanlana, sub-deacon, and Rev. Father P. J. McGovern of Rockport, were masters of ceremony.

    2

    Many Polish priests were present, among them Rev. Fathers Zwierzchonski, Sztuczko, Zelinski and others. Some of the speakers who took part in this great consecration were Rev. Father J. L. Regasz of St. Vincent parish, Judge Tuthill and Mr. Willam J. Onahan.

    The new building which at the present time is three stories high will be four stories high when completed. It will be 400 feet long, 60 feet wide, and will cost 150,000 dollars. The old home of the Good Shepherd, which is fifty years old, is located at Hill and Market Street. It is 300 feet high and 50 feet wide; at the present time there are 478 people under the care of 38 sisters.

    The new building will have four separate sections: in section one will be placed the unfortunate aged people who can spend the remainder of their life in peace and comfort; the second section is for women sent there by the criminal court; the third section will consist of young girls sent there by the court, and in the fourth section will be placed incorrigible children placed there by their parents.

    In spite of the intolerable rain yesterday afternoon about 8,000 people from various sections of our city gathered to witness the consecration of the cornerstone for the new home of ...

    Polish
    II D 5, II D 4, II E 3, IV