The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Times -- November 15, 1872
    [St. Stanislaus Association Has Anniversary]

    The seventh anniversary of the Polish Benevolent Association of St. Stanislaus Kostka occurred yesterday. At 1 A.M. a large concourse of our Polish citizens assembled at the church of the society on Milwaukee Ave. near Division St., where appropriate religious services were held. Father Juskeivitz officiated at the altar. A noteworthy feature was the fine orchestral music.

    In the afternoon the society met at the hall, corner of Noble and Bradley Sts., and took action on the organization of a central Polish-American committee. The Polish population of Chicago is quite large and the members are among the most thrifty and orderly of our citizens.

    The seventh anniversary of the Polish Benevolent Association of St. Stanislaus Kostka occurred yesterday. At 1 A.M. a large concourse of our Polish citizens assembled at the church of the ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II D 1
  • Chicago Tribune -- September 24, 1880
    Convention

    The first annual convention of the United Polish Benevolent Society was begun yesterday in the club-room of the Palmer House.

    Credentials were presented by the following delegates:- J. Andrzejkowicz, Philadelphia; J. Glowczynski, Grand Rapids, Mich.; K. J. Malsk, Northim, Wis.; F. J. Borchardt and J. Wendzinski, Milwaukee; R. Stobiecki, F. Sowadski, J. Krzemieniecki, W. Puterch, I. Rewerski, M. Kucera, and W. Dyniewitz, Chicago. Mr. J. Andrzejkowicz was chosen as chairman.

    A new constitution and by-laws were presented, and the meeting adjourned until today, when the annual election of officers will be held.

    The first annual convention of the United Polish Benevolent Society was begun yesterday in the club-room of the Palmer House. Credentials were presented by the following delegates:- J. Andrzejkowicz, Philadelphia; ...

    Polish
    III B 4, II D 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 10, 1891
    Polish Activities in St. Adalbert's Parish

    Chicago, Illinois, June 1, 1891.

    We Poles and Lithuanians living in Chicago have organized a fraternal organization, "Tow. Polakow I Litwinow, Bratniej Pomocy Krola Zygmunta." (King Sigismund's Polish-Lithuanian Fraternal Society) Saint Stanislaus, Bishop and Martyr, was chosen as the patron saint of our Society. Our object is to organize a society to be affiliated with some parish. We do not know to which parish we shall belong because we are scattered throughout Chicago. We are willing to join that parish which has the largest number of our members, provided we secure the approval of the pastor.

    The following members have been elected as officers of the organization:

    Joseph Matulewicz, president;

    Andrew Murawski, vice-president;

    Vincent Syperski, recording secretary;

    Jerome Lukowski, financial secretary;

    Joseph Syperski, treasurer;

    2

    Michael Drogiala, Casimir Romanowski, and Anthony Milewski, members of the advisory board.

    All correspondence in regard to the Society should be addressed to Jerome Lukowski, 403 West 16th Street.

    Chicago, Illinois, June 1, 1891. We Poles and Lithuanians living in Chicago have organized a fraternal organization, "Tow. Polakow I Litwinow, Bratniej Pomocy Krola Zygmunta." (King Sigismund's Polish-Lithuanian Fraternal Society) ...

    Polish
    II D 1, II D 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 11, 1891
    St. Stanislaus Kostka's Society

    We have received a copy of the constitution of St. Stanislaus Kostka's Society which celebrated its silver jubilee last Sunday. The document was printed in Paris in 1869.

    This constitution is a very important document because it is the first constitution of a Polish society and has served as a model for drawing up other constitutions.

    The title of this constitution adopted in Chicago, Illinois, in North America, on June 1, 1866 is: The Constitution and Bylaws of St. Stanislaus Kostka's Brotherly Aid Society. The introduction to this constitution reads:

    In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, amen.

    Introduction

    In order that the Polish Roman Catholic people may be united by the bonds of 2brotherly love; in order that charitable deeds such as visiting and helping the sick, burying the dead, and helping the widows and orphans may prevail in this brotherly group; and in order that brotherhood, harmony, unity, and moral habits of body and soul may be found among us, we have founded a Brotherly Aid Society under the patronage of Saint Stanislaus Kostka.

    Titles of articles containing the bylaws:

    I. Name and emblem of the Society. II. Principles of the Society. III. Officers. (These are: a president, a vice-president, a secretary, an assistant secretary, three advisers, a cashier, a marshal, and a doorman.) IV-XI. Duties of officials. XII. Membership and dues. XIII. Election of candidates. XIV. Religious ceremonies. XV. Conducting of meetings. XVI. Taking care of the sick. XVII. Funeral ceremonies. XVIII. Unforeseen incidents. Article XIX. reads as follows:

    Article XIX.

    Section one. The constitution and bylaws cannot be changed, amended, or 3suspended without the consent of three-fourths of the members of the Society, and such changes, etc. can only occur at an annual meeting.

    This constitution and these bylaws have been unanimously adopted by St. Stanislaus Kostka's Brotherly Aid Society in Chicago, Illinois, on June 1, 1866.

    President: Peter Kiolbassa

    Secretary: Marcellus Ziomkowski

    Advisory Council:

    Lawrence Stasz

    Joseph Dziewior

    Thomas Nowicki

    Anthony Bok

    Anthony Matysiak

    We have received a copy of the constitution of St. Stanislaus Kostka's Society which celebrated its silver jubilee last Sunday. The document was printed in Paris in 1869. This constitution ...

    Polish
    II D 1, III C, III A, II D 3, II D 10
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 18, 1892
    Polish Welfare Organization

    Yesterday at 4 P.M., the first meeting was held to make plans for an organized welfare association that will look after the poverty-stricken throughout St. Stanislaus Kostki's parish at St. Stanislaus Kostki's parish hall. An executive committee was chosen, and given the power to elect other functionary groups. A bureau of intelligence was among the first to be organized.

    The function of this department will be primarily one of investigation and information. It will try to locate the jobless in industry and commerce. An outlook will be kept on all branches of industry, relative to getting as many of the idle to work as soon as possible.

    2

    The following members of the parish have been picked for the executive body:

    Peter Kiolbassa

    Stanislaus Kunz

    Victor Bardonski

    August Kowalski

    P. Ratkowski

    Louis Biadaszkiewicz

    Sigmund Czsplinski

    August Rudnicki

    Jacob Mucha

    Frank Wleklinski

    Walter Pyterek

    Frank Murkowski

    Frances Zwierzynski

    Frank Okon

    Father Vincent Barzynski

    3

    This meeting,for the assistance of the poor, was attended by many of the parishioners. This marked the initial step in organized welfare work. At the termination of this assembly, there was good indication that the enterprise will be met with success.

    The first organized meeting of this institution will be held Sunday, January 24, at 4 P.M.

    Yesterday at 4 P.M., the first meeting was held to make plans for an organized welfare association that will look after the poverty-stricken throughout St. Stanislaus Kostki's parish at St. ...

    Polish
    II D 1, III C, II D 8
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 28, 1892
    Sacred Heart Society Elects Officers for the New Year

    New officers were elected to head the executive board of the Sacred Heart Society No. 1, at a meeting held last Tuesday, at St. Stanislaus Kostki's Parish hall. The president's chair went to M. Kalaczynski; John Reich, vice-president; Stanislaus Czajka, recording secretary. J. Jedrzejewski was chosen guardian of the sick.

    A resolution was passed lowering the initiation fees as follows: Those from the ages of 18 to 25, three dollars; from 25 to 35, five dollars, from 35 to 40 eight dollars.

    The Sacred Heart Society No. 1, maintains a death benefit fund for their members. At the present time there about 134 in this group. This 2organization is connected with the Roman Catholic Church.

    Those who are of good character and standing and wish to join this Catholic organization are invited to attend any of our meetings, which are held every fourth Tuesday of the month. You will be convinced that it will be to your advantage to be a member of this organization.

    New officers were elected to head the executive board of the Sacred Heart Society No. 1, at a meeting held last Tuesday, at St. Stanislaus Kostki's Parish hall. The president's ...

    Polish
    III B 2, III C, II D 3, II D 2, II D 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 03, 1892
    The Patriotic Organization Merits a Larger Membership

    The Patriotic organization, under the auspices of the St. Stanislaus Kostka's parish, is the only one of its kind in the United States whose only aim is to elevate the position of the Pole to a higher plane, and to instill a better patriotic feeling. This society held its second meeting of the year Sunday at the parish headquarters.

    Members of this group do not gain any material profit by being part of this association. Many times they make small voluntary contributions for patriotic purposes. The activity of these men is carried on without much publicity, however, their purposes are praiseworthy.

    It is not surprising to discover that where there is in operation a project without remuneration for the benefit of the people, there will not be found any noted patriotic haranguers. There will be found only a small handful of people who offer their services willingly, who understand the need for patriotic teaching, and who pursue this work quietly.

    2

    There are slightly over two hundred persons belonging to the Patriotic Organization. We have called such a group a small handful because we feel that out of this great parish there ought to be twenty thousand represented in this club. For criticism and reproach, there are found many times this number, but for an altruistic endeavor, such as this organization is performing, there are hardly over two hundred. This hurts. Although we must admit that our ranks are growing daily, we feel that it is at too small a rate.

    Besides the routine matters, the committee of the Patriotic Organization ratified the constitution of the Dramatic Club, a branch of this group, during the last meeting. The question of the library was settled. It was decided to call it a "parishional library," because it was felt that all the members of the parish would benefit by it if it were open to them.

    Father Vincent Barzynski announced that a special committee would be appointed to take charge.

    3

    Friday February 5, was set aside as a day of prayer for the oppressed Poles in Russia. The Polish Welfare organization has been asked to participate. All the Poles are urged to take part.

    The newly confirmed Dramatic club, according to an accepted resolution, will stage a three-act play sometime this month. A committee has been appointed to make plans for the debut.

    The Patriotic organization, under the auspices of the St. Stanislaus Kostka's parish, is the only one of its kind in the United States whose only aim is to elevate the ...

    Polish
    III C, IV, I C, II D 1, II B 2 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 05, 1892
    Polish Welfare Association of Chicago (Editorial)

    The readers of the Dziennik Chicagoski are familiar with the earnest activity going on to help to solve the urgent needs of our less fortunate brothers.

    We have been accused by fellow-citizens of other nationality groups of having our citizens beg out in the streets and criticized for falsely representing the Christian faith because we do not practice Christian doctrines.

    It has been announced and explained that a Polish Welfare Association has been organized and a committee chosen. This committee has been appointed 2two weeks ago to make plans for this project. If the plans materialize, this organization will place the Poles on the same level with other nationalities relative to aiding its poor. Those that have any doubts about the intentions of such a plan are welcomed to examine the statements of the committee.

    We are concerned about those who can understand the principles of such an organization, for they can become actual members or founders of this great work, and give it impetus. It could enact rules and regulations that would be strong enough to endure all difficulties and elevate the Christian honor and position of the Poles living in this great city.

    Without ardent Christian supporters and active honest members, an association 3of welfare cannot materialize. In the presence of nearly one hundred thousand Poles in Chicago the maintenance of this kind of society under intelligent arrangement and wise administration can be possible, although it will not perform extraordinary things. However, without certain moral and material offerings, no organization can exist.

    It is well known that no conscientious Christian turns his eyes from the sight of an unfortunate situation. He is always willing to offer assistance to those stricken with poverty. It is a different thing entirely to recognize a situation of this kind and deny it assistance. It is also another matter to help someone occasionally instead of everyone in a like predicament; and another matter to offer persistent assistance to all the poor.

    4

    Therefore, during Apostolic times when help was carried out on a large scale, it was necessary to form a special order of deacons for this particular work. The history of the Holy Roman Catholic Church shows evidence of organizing and maintaining such institutions for the aid of the unfortunate.

    This could not have been any different for the Holy Ghost gave them all the same hearts.

    "The multitudes were of one heart and everything was shared in common." (quoted from the Bible). The early Christians well remembered the words of their Lord and Savior: "Come my blessed friends of my Father and share the Kingdom that has been prepared for you since the dawn of time. When I 5was hungry you gave Me food, when I was thirsty you offered Me water, when I was a guest you have quartered Me; when I was naked you have garbed Me, when I was ill you visited Me, when I was in prison you came to see Me."....Then he will say to them who have been collected on the left side: "When I was thirsty you denied Me water" ...and they will answer: "When did we see You, O Lord, thirsty, hungry, or unclad... and did not serve You?"

    And He will answer: "As long as you have not helped those unfortunates within your surroundings (My brothers) you have not helped Me, but denied Me!" 25th Gospel of St. Matthew.

    6

    Therefore, the entire civilized Christian world is outstanding for its help to the poor.

    Because there was no official welfare organ organized in any of the parishes, various societies have undertaken this work in part. The churches through the sponsorship of special donations and collections have also managed to participate in helping the poor. But the growing ranks of the poor necessitated the formulation of a society to cope with the situation. Today, there has been a formal announcement made of this kind of an organization called "The Polish Welfare Association," which has spread its wings over all the Polish parishes of Chicago. Since St. Stanislaus Kostka parish is the oldest and the largest in this city, it has undertaken the pioneering work of this project.

    7

    Whoever is a Christian, whoever has a kind heart, whoever is rich in patriotic feeling, and whoever persues happiness and success in this free country and great city, let him not deny a helping hand.

    We implore the present Polish population of Chicago, who are citizens of honor, to give a helping hand with an open heart to this noble cause. In this respect, they will become the founders and builders of a strong foundation of this organization. Through this kind of action, we will help to elevate the standard of those of our brothers who have been economically stricken, and show to other nationalities that we are not beggars, but a homogeneous group of progressive people willing to lend its unfortunate brothers a hand.

    In the name of Jesus Christ, we beg of all of you to attend the meeting to be held at the Polish Hall Sunday, February 7, at 4 P. M.

    The readers of the Dziennik Chicagoski are familiar with the earnest activity going on to help to solve the urgent needs of our less fortunate brothers. We have been accused ...

    Polish
    I C, III C, II D 1, II D 10
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 05, 1892
    The Liberty League (Editorial)

    The Liberty League can be of great service in the future and perform a great deal of good if it proves itself not to be a hindrance, in which case it will endanger its fundamental principles. Before joining it, a society should consider the principles upon which the league is founded, to the inclusion of its by-laws and immediate objectives, because although today there are many leagues which are outstanding in their field, there are also others which are poor imitations only.

    The Liberty League announces that it desires the cooperation of those societies the efforts of which are towards the promotion of patriotism, Christian endeavor, temperance, woman suffrage, a better political system, and a higher standard of living.

    2

    What is the hidden meaning of these words? The most sublime ideas are expressed alongside the most ridiculous. Woman suffrage, for example, was propounded by Christianity, which has given woman an immortal soul and equal rights with man. But the apostolic emancipators of woman go to ridiculous extremes. They place woman above man, thus disrupting the most suitable division of duties in the family in the most absurd manner and contrary to natural law.

    The work carried on for the betterment of political systems is taken up by all the political organizations, each formulating its particular platform. They begin with the Republican party and end with the extremist, anarchist, and nihilist. Each one of these organizations believes that its "ism" is the best.

    Under the banner of temperance there are those who believe in moderation and those who deny themselves the minutest drop even for medicinal purposes.

    3

    Among the Christians there are those who observe Christian doctrines and traditions in detail and those who have adopted this religion under some peculiar form, such as the Mormons, Baptists, Russian Orthodox, etc.

    For the promotion of better citizenship there are many organizations which, sponsored by various factions, are already in this field, each having its particular system for this purpose.

    What does all this mean? In reality, it all means that all the societies that join the Liberty League, though they realize that they are fording the River of Darkness, gather to one common fold where the majority decides what system is best to recognize and which policies they are to follow and protect. Although each society keeps itself within its original aim, all submit to the majority rule, which governs the fundamental principles of the entire organization. From today on the Polish National Alliance will be subject to these conditions, made possible by the good graces of the Central Committee.

    4

    The Alliance, which has been primarily instituted for patriotic purposes, will lose all its independence to the majority rule of the Liberty League, which without doubt will join other radical organizations. Can anyone say today who will definitely gain superiority? Will this be agreeable in any degree to the Polish people? Will this fulfill their treasured dreams, or will it burst like a fancy bauble? Undoubtedly, the Alliance will have to accept the League's present platform.

    The League, in one of its statements to the press, said that it adheres to the policy of vox populi, vox Dei (The voice of the people is the voice of God) and that it believes it does more common good for the common people than Dei Gratia (grace of God), for up to the present time, the close of the nineteenth century, Dei Gratia has not as yet fulfilled our most necessary needs and desires.

    From this day "Vox populi, Vox Dei" will be recognized by the Polish National Alliance because "Dei Gratia" does not accomplish enough for the organization. "Vox populi" is the voice of the people, the voice for a greater League. It 5would not be so bad to adhere to the voice of the people, but to deny the grace of God is an entirely different matter. This is exactly what the Alliance is doing. It is now going to listen to the voice of the people, because it is the voice of God. This has been demonstrated during the French Revolution. In Paris the people avowed that there was no God, for the people were God. Anarchists, nihilists, and communists pay homage to this maxim. The Liberty League and the Polish National Alliance have now joined these ranks.

    For what further purpose will these remarks serve? What is the use of making these assertions? What has been said will serve for the present. However, we will repeat that although the League would show that it is the most advantageous and accommodating organization for the people, which is shown by its previous accomplishments, the Central Committee was not justified in its action; it should have informed its constituents of its plans instead of acting independently, Had the Committee been concerned in presenting the Polish issue before the present Republican Congress, it would have refrained from joining the ranks of the Liberty League as yet. If the entire membership of the Alliance wanted to become a part of the League, a vote should have been cast. Nevertheless, the committee joined hands with the League on its own volition, just for publicity's sake.

    The Liberty League can be of great service in the future and perform a great deal of good if it proves itself not to be a hindrance, in which case ...

    Polish
    III B 2, I K, I E, I C, I F 2, I B 1, III C, III A, II D 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 01, 1892
    Polish Welfare Association Meeting Postponed

    Because of the inclement weather last night the meeting of the Polish Welfare Association's board of directors was postponed. The few directors who were present decided that it would be advisable to hold the meeting next Friday at 7:00 P.M.. Important administrative matters are to be discussed.

    Although the meeting was attended by a small minority, a number of well-known Polish people came to join the society. This is a good indication that this organization is highly regarded by our people. It is apparent that the love-thy-neighbor spirit has not been extinguished in their hearts. The patriotic spirit has not only been revived but it has been spread.

    2

    This support is not only for the people, it is also for the support of God. It shows that the Polish people are banding more closely together. That class differences are being forgotten, that they are joining forces to help one main cause. And this is the preservation of their kind. They are only concerned with the welfare of the unfortunates.

    The beginning of this kind of work, like any endeavor, is difficult from the beginning, for the work bears no remuneration. But the love of the neighbor and the love for God has become a triumphant banner. This kind of work is of an altruistic nature and should be considered heroic.

    Whoever is working and offering his time gratis to fulfill the work of God: "Blessed is he that giveth, just as the one that receiveth," becomes 3like unto God.

    Next Sunday a general meeting will be held by the Association at 4 P.M. All those interested in the procedure, purpose, and progress of the Welfare Society are invited to attend.

    The initial efforts and accomplishments will be revealed to the public. Many of its aspects will be open for discussion. The steps taken in the direction of helping the poor may be small, but since the inception of this service the purpose of it has been completely carried out. The future strides will be easier, bigger and better.

    In conclusion we wish to point out the biblical saying; "If you do not build the home, all the work for its preparation is wasted." And so it is with this organization. But the home was built and the work was fruitful.

    Because of the inclement weather last night the meeting of the Polish Welfare Association's board of directors was postponed. The few directors who were present decided that it would be ...

    Polish
    II D 1, II D 10, III B 2