The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- June 21, 1880
    [Garfield and Arthur Club Organized]

    In answer to a call, there was a large meeting of the English-speaking Poles held at the corner of Milwaukee Ave. and Noble St., last evening, and a Garfield and Arthur Club was organized.

    The meeting was called to order by K. J. Malek, and Peter Kiolbassa was called to the chair. Messrs. Kiolbassa and Krzemieniecki made speeches in their native tongue, advocating the cause of Garfield and Arthur, and the result was the information of a club.

    The following officers were elected:- President, Peter Kiolbassa; Vice-President, J. Krzemieniecki; Secretary, K. J. Malek; and Treasurer, Joseph Gillmeister.

    The club promises to be a strong one, if the enthusiasm of last evening can be taken as an indication.

    In answer to a call, there was a large meeting of the English-speaking Poles held at the corner of Milwaukee Ave. and Noble St., last evening, and a Garfield and ...

    Polish
    I F 2
  • Zgoda -- March 07, 1888
    Political Club

    Article written by Mr. K. Olszewski,

    Chicago, March 1, 1888.

    The first Polish political club is now being organized in the vicinity of Main St. Citizens, hearing of this, went there and were told by well known speakers of fine reputation they would make themselves and their magistrates known. Every one present was glad to hear it and willing to do his share.

    This way we shall be able to have this political club organized. Every Pole living in this neighborhood is invited to our large meeting which is held frequently.

    K. Olszewski.

    Article written by Mr. K. Olszewski, Chicago, March 1, 1888. The first Polish political club is now being organized in the vicinity of Main St. Citizens, hearing of this, went ...

    Polish
    I F 2
  • Zgoda -- July 25, 1888
    Polish Club in Chicago

    At the 16th political ward where not so long ago the Poles elected their first Polish alderman, Mr. A. J. Kowalski, a Republican Polish club has been established.

    The president is Mr. M. Osucha, and the secretary, Mr. I. N. Morgenstern.

    We shall have more news about this in our future issues.

    At the 16th political ward where not so long ago the Poles elected their first Polish alderman, Mr. A. J. Kowalski, a Republican Polish club has been established. The president ...

    Polish
    I F 2, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 29, 1891
    Polish Activities in Chicago

    A great political massmeeting took place last night at Andrew Schultz's hall, 697 Noble Street. The meeting was a very important one in that it was called to name a committee for the 16th Ward Democratic political organization. Elected for this committee were Mr. John Arkuszewski, president; Victor Bardonski, vice-president; and J. Kendziorski, secretary. An executive committee was also formed of which the following persons were elected members: John Czekata, E. Z. Brodowski, M. Michalski, Frank Murkowski, Joseph Pytlak, W. Tomasik, and John Biniak. Mr. Peter Kiolbasa was picked out as candidate for alderman of the ward. Mr. Kiolbasa, we think, will get all the votes of the Poles and also many votes from other groups, because his ability and righteousness are well known not only to the Poles but also, to the Americans and the Germans. The committee will have its meeting next Sunday night.

    A great political massmeeting took place last night at Andrew Schultz's hall, 697 Noble Street. The meeting was a very important one in that it was called to name a ...

    Polish
    IV, I F 5, I F 4, I F 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 14, 1891
    America and Poland (Editorial)

    Come to me all you who are oppressed and enslaved. You, who are not allowed to act, speak, feel, and think, according to the dictates of your heart in your own land; come under "protecting wings of freedom." Here you may profess your religion, express your emotions, and love your country openly, for here we have freedom and independence.

    Free America appeals to the Irish, Poles, and all similarly oppressed nations. Those who have lived in bondage can seek freedom here. Here they breathe freely, and rest in peace, and here, with pride, they become citizens of a free country, which is not ruled either by the Czar or knout.

    To this country have come the Germans, Frenchmen, Italians, Spaniards, Englishmen, and Swedes, whose fatherland they will always cherish, but 2their government was a burden to them. To this country have come all nationalities for the purpose of creating a great Republic of the free, and unfortunate; here also have come those who are unworthy of freedom and liberty, and for this reason the right kind of citizens must make laws which will protect us against the evil influence of the undesirables.

    However, a person does not cease to be a son of his motherland on account of becoming a naturalized citizen of this country. His presence and exemplary life in this country are a living protest against conditions created by a certain clique in his native land. It is an example of a life which he desires to see in his fatherland. It is an endeavor to introduce these conditions in a country which he left.

    If we wish to make this example affective, if we wish to open the eyes of the blind, or of those who abuse authority, we must enact practical laws and obey them.

    3

    This example is workable, for it operates in all countries which have introduced democratic constitutions, except in Russia.

    These reforms in the democratic countries have been affected by the good example of the United States. This example has opened the eyes of the oppressed, and also of the oppressors; the first demanded more rights, and the second granted them. If the governments of those democratic governments do not function properly, it is because the example was not, and is not yet perfect. Let us improve this example. Let us make it worthy of imitation, and the results produced by its influence in the next hundred years will be more apparent.

    In order to accomplish this, we must have, above all, good schools, for "knowledge is mother of wisdom, and ignorance is mother of bondage. We must have good schools, schools that educate mind and heart, because one is incomplete without the other; schools which teach knowledge and morality; schools that are not below the standard of those in Europe, 4if we wish to bring up good citizens, an example for Europe.

    Freedom does not mean giving up the faith, language, or traditions, of the fathers. Only the Czar's government is depriving its people of these things by means of the knout. Democratic governments do not do that.

    The English language has been adopted as a medium of thought exchange in the United States, because the English originally, were predominant in this country. As good citizens, we should know the language of the country, but this does not mean that this country is forcing any one to give up his native tongue. A country must have a common language for the good of the whole nation, and every good citizen should know it.

    Come to me all you who are oppressed and enslaved. You, who are not allowed to act, speak, feel, and think, according to the dictates of your heart in your ...

    Polish
    I C, I A 1 a, I A 3, I F 2, I F 4, I F 6, I E
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 16, 1891
    County Democracy Marching Club Polish Section

    Almost every Chicagoan interested in politics, especially if he is a Democrat, knows of the [Cook] County Democracy Marching Club. The majority of the members belonging to this organization are young people who take a very active part in politics and attend important political meetings. Their appearance adds color to the gatherings, attracts public attention and awakens an interest in politics.

    The Polish people met them first when Senator Palmer came to Chicago to deliver his initial political speech at the Polish hall. They attracted every one's attention when their group escorted Senator Palmer into the hall for they were dressed elegantly and wore top hats.

    Although this club was organized for social purposes, it helps the young people to become acquainted with politics, initiates them into political secrets and encourages them to participate in political activities. Thus the club prepares 2the membership for future [representation in the National government as well as the Democratic party.]

    Membership in such a club would be of great benefit to young Poles; therefore Mr. August J. Kowalski, a well-known citizen, has devised a very practical plan. He proposes that a Polish section should be formed in co-operation with the club's headquarters, and that the younger Poles should become members. The editor of this newspaper heartily endorse his plan for in our opinion such action would awaken an interest in local politics.

    Tomorrow night there will be a gathering at A. J. Kowalski's hall, 617 Noble Street for the purpose of organizing such a section. All and especially the younger generation who intend to join the club, are invited. We hope that a Polish section of that club will be successfully organized. The county headquarters is enthusiastic about the plan. By this action we will outdo the Germans who thus far have not organized their own section.

    Almost every Chicagoan interested in politics, especially if he is a Democrat, knows of the [Cook] County Democracy Marching Club. The majority of the members belonging to this organization are ...

    Polish
    III E, I F 2, I F 3, I C, I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- June 01, 1891
    Polish Voters Enthusiastic

    An enthusiastic meeting of the Kosciuszko Polish Political Club of the Thirty-third Ward was held at the parish hall, Exchange Ave. and 88th St., last evening, at which the non-partisan judicial ticket was unanimously indorsed.

    The hall was crowded, fully 500 Polish voters being present. S. F. Adalia Satalecki, James E. Dudek, Adam Walkowiak, and Martin Wiora, the President of the club, made addresses in favor of the non-partisan ticket.

    The club is an independent political organization over four-hundred strong. Last night's meeting was the largest it has ever held.

    An enthusiastic meeting of the Kosciuszko Polish Political Club of the Thirty-third Ward was held at the parish hall, Exchange Ave. and 88th St., last evening, at which the non-partisan ...

    Polish
    I F 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 07, 1892
    Disagreement in the Polish Press (Editorial)

    The last number of Zgoda was to be one of a peaceful nature. Various polemic articles and correspondence have been set aside, according to an agreement of the editors. It is apparent that harmony, unity, and cooperation are finally wanted.

    But what kind of articles? Those who have written them are going to shoulder heavy responsibilities. Every unprejudiced person, who desires unity and peace must suffer the consequences of these news stories. Such items should not be published if this union is to be attained, they should never reach the public eye, and true facts should never be misrepresented. For example, Mr. Karlokowski has asked for a vote, and had the motion affirmed relative to the protest against Russian and German oppression of Poland. Immediately following, Rev. Father Barzynski asked for a vote to oppose the proposed protest against Germany because this may change her attitude towards the 2Polish minority. Not only that, but Germany has granted the demands of this group. Rev. Father D. Stablewski has been appointed bishop of the Posen province, and the Polish tongue has been permitted to be taught in the schools. Since Germany has become liberal-minded toward Poland, Father Barzynski pointed out, it would be wrong for this protest to be made, for everything that has been gained would be lost. As a result, the Poles abroad would not only suffer, but over 20,000 Poles in Chicago would probably have their jobs jeopardized. This caused a controversy, mostly because some of the questions and replies were misunderstood. The argument came to an end through the timely suggestion of the presiding chairman, Peter Kiolbassa, who called the meeting to an end, and lead the entire assemblage to church. Here prayers were offered for the success of the mass meeting.

    Why were these facts twisted, why were they so grossly misrepresented? Why is it that the Zgoda, which desires peace and unity, did not publish the copy of the minutes of the secretary of the mass meeting as was requested 3by the Dziennik Chicagoski, and as was agreed upon? Why were the results of the meeting padded with different meaning? Is this the right road to understanding and cooperation? Is not this a deliberate attack? Let those officials and members of the Polish National Alliance that desire unity answer.

    The results of the article that appeared in the Zgoda are summarized as follows: The protest plans of the committee of Fifteen were made in too much of a hurry. The Alliance is going to support this protest, but on different grounds, and after an understanding with our people abroad, along with the study of the situation has been made. Therefore, join the Alliance, and help this cause.

    It would be better for you, gentlemen, to take interest in these mass meetings and attend them. Your suggestions may become very helpful and useful. Instead, you are trying to create an independent stand. Then why are you asking for unity in this work? The mass gathering of January 1 4was just a beginning in our efforts to help our unfortunate people in Europe. Others are to follow, and the subject is going to be discussed more thoroughly. Open discussions will be held. why do you not make these gatherings more successful, why not have your ablest men represent the organization? They will see for themselves that many other minority groups participate. Why not follow the resolutions of the majority as we do? This step would be more favorable than the one which is being followed. Do not arouse the wrath of God by twisting the true facts which have been proposed by the Committee. Do not depend on a solution of this problem on the action of the next Congress at Washington, D. C. This kind of attitude will not bring about a peaceful settlement of our differences.

    The mere statement made by you "that the government has already taken certain steps to solve the question of Poland in order to have this before Congress, that the government is going to use various means in voicing its protests against the violent offenses of the three conquering nations of Poland, and 5then if we are convinced of favorable results shown by the next Congress, which is practically Republican, towards Poland, we will act." It is impossible to convince anyone through debates. This is hardly sufficient for such a grave problem. You want to be convinced first that this will bring results, and then agree upon it. Gentlemen, gentlemen, this is not the road to mutual agreement.

    Come to the next meeting if you have a desire. Familiarize yourselves with the procedure, but do not resort to the unpleasant road of distorting the news in the paper, for you will never be able to get the support of the press in general for many years to come. Let our papers serve us an instrument which will present our problem in an understanding manner. By enlightening the world at large with clear facts we will be able to elevate public opinion, and gain its assistance. Let our papers play this role, and public opinion will be with us. Let us not make it a battlefield for controversy.

    6

    This is the role we should play. This is the road we should take. There is no other way, no other route to solidarity. Drop any ideas of what Washington is going to do about the Polish question to the wayside, Let all of us strive to create better public opinion about our beloved country; let us become the guiding star for future betterment of our cause. Let us help those people who are trying to win a place in the world. Let Congress, as soon as it wishes, offer its help, but the freedom of making laws and resolutions should be left to the public.

    The last number of Zgoda was to be one of a peaceful nature. Various polemic articles and correspondence have been set aside, according to an agreement of the editors. It ...

    Polish
    I C, I F 2, I F 3, I H
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 05, 1892
    The Liberty League (Editorial)

    The Liberty League can be of great service in the future and perform a great deal of good if it proves itself not to be a hindrance, in which case it will endanger its fundamental principles. Before joining it, a society should consider the principles upon which the league is founded, to the inclusion of its by-laws and immediate objectives, because although today there are many leagues which are outstanding in their field, there are also others which are poor imitations only.

    The Liberty League announces that it desires the cooperation of those societies the efforts of which are towards the promotion of patriotism, Christian endeavor, temperance, woman suffrage, a better political system, and a higher standard of living.

    2

    What is the hidden meaning of these words? The most sublime ideas are expressed alongside the most ridiculous. Woman suffrage, for example, was propounded by Christianity, which has given woman an immortal soul and equal rights with man. But the apostolic emancipators of woman go to ridiculous extremes. They place woman above man, thus disrupting the most suitable division of duties in the family in the most absurd manner and contrary to natural law.

    The work carried on for the betterment of political systems is taken up by all the political organizations, each formulating its particular platform. They begin with the Republican party and end with the extremist, anarchist, and nihilist. Each one of these organizations believes that its "ism" is the best.

    Under the banner of temperance there are those who believe in moderation and those who deny themselves the minutest drop even for medicinal purposes.

    3

    Among the Christians there are those who observe Christian doctrines and traditions in detail and those who have adopted this religion under some peculiar form, such as the Mormons, Baptists, Russian Orthodox, etc.

    For the promotion of better citizenship there are many organizations which, sponsored by various factions, are already in this field, each having its particular system for this purpose.

    What does all this mean? In reality, it all means that all the societies that join the Liberty League, though they realize that they are fording the River of Darkness, gather to one common fold where the majority decides what system is best to recognize and which policies they are to follow and protect. Although each society keeps itself within its original aim, all submit to the majority rule, which governs the fundamental principles of the entire organization. From today on the Polish National Alliance will be subject to these conditions, made possible by the good graces of the Central Committee.

    4

    The Alliance, which has been primarily instituted for patriotic purposes, will lose all its independence to the majority rule of the Liberty League, which without doubt will join other radical organizations. Can anyone say today who will definitely gain superiority? Will this be agreeable in any degree to the Polish people? Will this fulfill their treasured dreams, or will it burst like a fancy bauble? Undoubtedly, the Alliance will have to accept the League's present platform.

    The League, in one of its statements to the press, said that it adheres to the policy of vox populi, vox Dei (The voice of the people is the voice of God) and that it believes it does more common good for the common people than Dei Gratia (grace of God), for up to the present time, the close of the nineteenth century, Dei Gratia has not as yet fulfilled our most necessary needs and desires.

    From this day "Vox populi, Vox Dei" will be recognized by the Polish National Alliance because "Dei Gratia" does not accomplish enough for the organization. "Vox populi" is the voice of the people, the voice for a greater League. It 5would not be so bad to adhere to the voice of the people, but to deny the grace of God is an entirely different matter. This is exactly what the Alliance is doing. It is now going to listen to the voice of the people, because it is the voice of God. This has been demonstrated during the French Revolution. In Paris the people avowed that there was no God, for the people were God. Anarchists, nihilists, and communists pay homage to this maxim. The Liberty League and the Polish National Alliance have now joined these ranks.

    For what further purpose will these remarks serve? What is the use of making these assertions? What has been said will serve for the present. However, we will repeat that although the League would show that it is the most advantageous and accommodating organization for the people, which is shown by its previous accomplishments, the Central Committee was not justified in its action; it should have informed its constituents of its plans instead of acting independently, Had the Committee been concerned in presenting the Polish issue before the present Republican Congress, it would have refrained from joining the ranks of the Liberty League as yet. If the entire membership of the Alliance wanted to become a part of the League, a vote should have been cast. Nevertheless, the committee joined hands with the League on its own volition, just for publicity's sake.

    The Liberty League can be of great service in the future and perform a great deal of good if it proves itself not to be a hindrance, in which case ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II D 1, III A, III C, I B 1, I F 2, I C, I E, I K
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 15, 1892
    Protest Action Scorned by Alliance (Editorial)

    Once again our readers, who wish success to the Dziennik Chicagoski as each day passes, have another opportunity to read more material of a malignant and polemical nature. The Central Committee of the Polish National Alliance has informed the people that they have signed over the entire organization to the Liberty League because they wish to take part in the Republican Congress. They believe this step is more important than the attempted plans "to make protests, where, nobody knows." When it was pointed out in a few articles that the Central Committee sold the entire organization on its own accord, and not by a majority vote of its members, and that in reality the Liberty League brought good as well as bad to the people, the papers began to rant and rave because the Dziennik Chicagoski; opposed the plan. Little do they realize the out-come 2of the resolutions that will affect the Polish National Alliance. It all depends upon the majority rule of the entire membership of the Liberty League. The benefits to be reaped by the latter organization, whether good or bad, will then be decided.

    We pointed these facts out because we have seen a loophole in this affiliation. There are possibilities that the Alliance may loose its individuality.

    At one time, other papers have asked the Alliance to take part in the joint protest against Russia, and criticized it for not taking part. But since it made the statement that it is useless to make protests in any direction, and since it joined the League, these same papers bow to this group, and consider the protest matter a buried issue.

    3

    One of these papers has changed its policy because the Liberty League was organized by Americans, and since it is American, there is no point in writing against it or criticizing it. It is apparent that this paper has committed a wrong. Sometime ago, it criticized the public school system, and now it has attacked the Liberty League. According to the point of view of that paper, it is wrong to pass comment on an important issue because it is American and, therefore, it is without error.

    We have merely pointed out that more harm than good may come out of the League transaction. Yet we are branded offensive by others.

    Once again our readers, who wish success to the Dziennik Chicagoski as each day passes, have another opportunity to read more material of a malignant and polemical nature. The Central ...

    Polish
    I F 2, I F 3, I F 4, I C