The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- December 20, 1871
    Scandinavian Bank

    Fred S. Winslow, president, wishes to inform all his countrymen that through his bank they can safely send and receive drafts to three Scandinavian countries as his bank is doing business only with reliable Scandinavian banks. He will also buy and sell all kinds of old gold and old silver. He will also handle your S.S. tickets through any of the reliable ocean steamer lines, if you want to send for relatives or friends.

    Fred S. Winslow, president, wishes to inform all his countrymen that through his bank they can safely send and receive drafts to three Scandinavian countries as his bank is doing ...

    Norwegian
    II A 2, III H
  • Skandinaven -- March 27, 1872
    Why Lie about the U.S.A

    The Norwegian Morgenblad's correspondent in Chicago never seems to tire of speaking ill about this country, which he by his own free will has adopted as his own. This country received him with open arms and gave him the same privileges as any native has. It is rather hard for us Norwegians to see how a wonderful country has been feeding a snake. America does not need to be praised; we are satisfied to let facts speak for themselves, but to speak a lot of lies is a shameful act for any American citizen to do. What motive can this man have for spreading such lies about the U.S.A. to the Norwegian people at home. Someone must have paid him for scattering all this dirt and for painting America and its way of doing things in a laughable manner. Could any man, coming to this country to take advantage of all the benefits that it offers be so small as to lie, even if he suffers misfortune in his political career?

    2

    We refuse to have our mother Country believe such trash as this correspondent is trying to give them. He attacks our state governments, our school, and politics in general. We feel cheap, especially when we think how enthusiastically Saren Jaabok, Bjornstjerne Bjornson, and Bergen Pasten speak about the U.S.A. For the sake of truth and for the sake of the U.S.A. we write these few lines to Norway and we stamp the correspondent a liar.

    The Norwegian Morgenblad's correspondent in Chicago never seems to tire of speaking ill about this country, which he by his own free will has adopted as his own. This country ...

    Norwegian
    III H
  • Skandinaven -- April 19, 1872
    Mrs. Waalers' Mission

    A couple of weeks ago I was at Mathiesen's Merchants Hotel to solicit ads for the Old Peoples Home program; I was introduced to a lady from Norway who unknown to me was a philanthropist who was traveling all over the U.S.A. for the purpose of contacting Norwegian girls and boys. She told them about their mother country and bringing them a message from Norway. She is going to give free lectures in all sections of Chicago. She asks all Norwegians to come and have a chat with her. She will take names and addresses of their families and call upon them on her return to Norway.

    She is the wife of Major Hjalmar Waalers of the Norwegian Army, and a daughter of Bishop Christian Dick in Norway.

    A couple of weeks ago I was at Mathiesen's Merchants Hotel to solicit ads for the Old Peoples Home program; I was introduced to a lady from Norway who unknown ...

    Norwegian
    III H
  • Skandinaven -- January 22, 1878
    [Seek Aid for Fire Victims]

    Nora Lodge I.R.H.K., held a meeting last Tuesday evening and resolved to collect as much as possible to help our people in the town of Levanger Norway, which was nearly burned to the ground on the 12th of December, 1877. A committee was appointed to get the collection started. Remember Norway helped us in 1870, let us get busy.

    Nora Lodge I.R.H.K., held a meeting last Tuesday evening and resolved to collect as much as possible to help our people in the town of Levanger Norway, which was nearly ...

    Norwegian
    II D 10, III H
  • Skandinaven -- April 29, 1878
    [Receive Letter of Thanks]

    The first Norwegian Temperance Club in Chicago received a letter of thanks from Levanger in Norway, for 350 Kroner sent to the sufferers of the fire in Levanger in 1877.

    The first Norwegian Temperance Club in Chicago received a letter of thanks from Levanger in Norway, for 350 Kroner sent to the sufferers of the fire in Levanger in 1877.

    Norwegian
    II D 10, III H, I B 1
  • Skandinaven -- April 27, 1880
    Chicago as a Harbor

    Now that the Welland Canal is completed, we can soon expect ocean traffic from Norway. We look forward to seeing our ships, because they will be a link with home. The completion of the Canal will, we think, be a boon to immigrants to Chicago and the Central States.

    Now that the Welland Canal is completed, we can soon expect ocean traffic from Norway. We look forward to seeing our ships, because they will be a link with home. ...

    Norwegian
    III H, III G
  • Skandinaven -- May 01, 1884
    Norway a Republic

    A group of prominent Norwegians recently held several mass meetings, and agitated generally for the rather new idea of making Norway a republic. We wonder what our Norwegian-Americans think about this. The reason for this move is that in Norway there is an opportunity for Sweden and Norway to form a Union.

    To us, this plan seems an impossibility, and consequently, we do not agree with the radicals along this line. We would much rather see an independent republic formed in Norway. Well, it may just be a lot of talk.

    A group of prominent Norwegians recently held several mass meetings, and agitated generally for the rather new idea of making Norway a republic. We wonder what our Norwegian-Americans think about ...

    Norwegian
    III H
  • Skandinaven -- January 16, 1892
    Swede and Norwegian (Editorial)

    The political disagreements and the consequent misunderstandings and strife which temporarily may spring up between neighbor peoples in the old world, should not be transplanted needlessly to their representatives on this side of the Atlantic. We may and we must have our sympathies, but these should be curbed as soon as they threaten to lead us beyond the limits of friendly rivalry and honorable competition. Here we are primarily Americans, and only secondarily and traditionally, Swedes and Norwegians.

    Sweden and Norway have lived in peace together as separate and independent kingdoms but with a common king for three quarters of a century,and, as we believe, with mutual advantage. That a relationship so unusual should be fully comprehended in both countries from the beginning, could not be expected. Questions have arisen which have put to test the sagacity of the statesman, as well as the intelligence, patience and good temper of the masses. Such questions 2are now agitating our kinsfolk beyond the seas, and we can hardly expect that they will all be settled in this generation. Their final adjustment, however, will certainly not be accelerated by stirring up strife or enmity between Swedes and Norwegians in this country.

    This is unfortunately the natural tendency, and, as it would seem, the direct aim of Mr. Robert Lindblom in his recent statements in The Press in this city and in his reply to criticisms in The North, a Minneapolis newspaper.

    The Skandinaven has already with sufficient severity characterized both the animus and the inaccuracies of Mr. Lindblom's effusion (in the foreign edition). We do not care to rehash these things for the edification of our own readers, nor do we wish to pursue Mr. Lindblom with any spirit of vindictiveness or revenge. The occasion does not call for it; indeed, we think his frivolous remarks have received too much attention already. But we do not desire that anyone who may have read them should suppose that they had remained unchallenged, and therefore accept them as a correct exposition of the relations between two peoples. We 3recognize in Mr. Lindblom a man of great energy and no inconsiderable native talent. These endowments he may put to much better use than his public statements both in addresses and in the press recently would indicate. His statements in regard to Norway--that her "politicians are trying with all their might to foster hatred towards their political superiors"--that they are "striving to gain political independence"--and that "experience shows Norway incapable of self-government"--are so malicious and false as to merit nothing but contempt. If Mr. L. had been familiar with the expressed sentiments of the sober-minded and well-informed men in his native country, he would have avoided this public display of his folly. The fact that the Scandinavian peninsula has enjoyed external peace since 1814, should be the sole and sufficient proof that Sweden forever must control the foreign policy of Norway, is another example of the political and economic wisdom of Mr. Lindblom.

    This new statesman seems to be unaware that in the national developments of today, there are other factors to be taken into account than the movements of 4armies and navies. That Mr. L. finally characterizes Bjornson as a "political mountebank whose failure as a poet has compelled him to seek other fields of action," that he is "in the pay of Russia" trying to excite hatred towards Sweden, and that both Bjornson and Ibsen are together trying to work themselves into passion and prominence by talking revolution, liberty and separation--are statements so sublimely ridiculous that anyone who is awake must attribute them to the disturbed dreams of one who has just made a disastrous plunge on the Board of Trade. But when he boastfully talks about the possibility of Sweden finding it necessary to administer "another spanking", the boyishness of the whole performance is so apparent that it is impossible to treat it with anything but amused forbearance. Who is it that is trying to "work himself into passion and prominence"? Where are we to look for "other fields of action"? It has given us pleasure to learn that Mr. Lindblom has made successful plunges on the Board of Trade and that he has come out of some of them covered with glory and gold, but from present indications, we are afraid that he will emerge from his plunges into journalism covered with a much less lustrous coating. If we are correctly informed, The Press is to be Mr. Lindblom's personal organ.

    5

    We would respectfully warn Mr. L. that in his present state of mind, it may prove as dangerous for him to toy with a newspaper as for a child to play with edged tools. Before he again ventures upon these international, political and historical themes, we commend him to the sound and dispassionate instructions of the editor of The North. We entertain nothing but feelings of friendship and respect for our brothers the Swedes, both in their native land and in this country, and we are sure that nothing Mr. Lindblom may say, or that may be said in criticism, will in any way disturb that amicable relationship and mutual good will which does, and forever should,bind the two peoples together in indissoluble union on both sides of the waters.

    The political disagreements and the consequent misunderstandings and strife which temporarily may spring up between neighbor peoples in the old world, should not be transplanted needlessly to their representatives on ...

    Norwegian
    I C, I C, IV, III H
  • Chicago Tribune -- May 30, 1892
    [Captain Wiese Welcomed]

    The Norwegian steamer Wergeland, whose entrance into Chicago harbor a few days ago was so enthusiastically welcomed, was the scene yesterday of further honors and festivities, the main feature of which was the presentation of a handsome American flag to Capt. Wiese, its commander. The presentation took place on the ship's bridge amidships. As Consul Svanoe, Mr. Thorp and others, escorting Captain Wiese, ascended the platform they faced an audience of four or five thousand people, who crowded the decks and the adjoining dock.

    Mr. Thorpe made the presentation speech. He said the gift was intended as a tribute of Norwegian-Americans to a gallant countryman and commander, and a reminder to the Fatherland that their hearts were still true to it. Turning to Captain Weise, Mr. Thorpe concluded by saying: "We welcome you, Captain, to Chicago as the representative of our fatherland, and as a memento of your venturesome trip, and in honor of yourself and your crew and your ship, we present you with The Stars and Stripes, the glory and the symbol of the free and greatest country on earth."

    2

    As the last words were spoken First Mate Amland of the Wergeland and Capt. John Anderson of this city pulled the halyards, and up The Stars and Stripes went, fluttering to the peak of the foremast, amid cheers and waving of hats. "Let us give the starry flag three rousing cheers," said Mr. Thorpe and they were given with a will and a roar. Capt. Weise in accepting the flag said he returned his heartfelt thanks to the Norwegian-Americans for their kindness, and for their gift which he would guard with honor and display in Norway.

    The Norwegian steamer Wergeland, whose entrance into Chicago harbor a few days ago was so enthusiastically welcomed, was the scene yesterday of further honors and festivities, the main feature of ...

    Norwegian
    III H
  • Skandinaven -- June 03, 1892
    [Communication]

    The Editor, Skandinaven:

    "Having time and time again noticed and read with pleasure your many plain expositions and well-directed efforts to convince disbelievers and misguided persons as to the real political relations between Norway and Sweden, the writer, who is a constant reader of the daily issue of your paper, respectfully asks space for a few remarks on that vexed question.

    "The more immediate occasion for coming back to this matter is an announcement in the Milwaukee Evening Wisconsin for May 27, in which it says editorially, 'It was inspiring to see the "Swedish" flag floating from the peak of a vessel in the port of Milwaukee,' referring to the steamer 'Wergeland' which honored that city by laying to for a while outside the harbor on her late passage to Chicago. This comment seems very improbable 2in the face of the fact that the 'Wergeland' hails from Bergen and is a Norwegian craft. There is no record that a Swedish vessel has ever been seen on these great inland seas.

    "But this is not the first time that that great and good paper, the Evening Wisconsin, has betrayed gross ignorance in matters of this sort, and made a laughing stock of itself. In its issue of November 28, 1891, space is given to a long communication which gives an account of the ancient Viking ship found at Gokstad 'on the Christiania Fjord'. This article was headed in large type: 'Out of a Swedish Mound'. This was refreshing indeed! When shortly afterwards the proper editors attention was called to this perversion of facts, he refused to make a correction in the columns of the paper, yet stated in writing, 'we do not hold ourselves blameless in the matter'.

    "It is no wonder at all that the small fry often fall into the pit when 3great leaders set the example.

    "While our Swedish brethren have for generations back distinguished themselves in scientific and industrial pursuits, our countrymen, from the time of the Vikings, have been known as seafarers and navigators of the first order, and have sailed every sea, in advance of many other voyagers. When the little brig, "Sleipner", came to Chicago as early as 1862, the Inter Ocean of that day gave a full account of that notable event, describing the craft as 'a perfect gem of shipbuilding'. The Northmen yield to no other nationality in good seamanship, and their country stands third in rank as to amount of tonnage afloat."

    The ship "Wergeland" docked in Chicago last week, the second Norwegian ship ever to reach Chicago. The "Wergeland", sails under Norwegian registry, and is manned by a Norwegian crew, Capt. Wiese and first officer Amland.

    The Editor, Skandinaven: "Having time and time again noticed and read with pleasure your many plain expositions and well-directed efforts to convince disbelievers and misguided persons as to the real ...

    Norwegian
    III H, I C, V B, I C, II B 2 d 1