The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • [Association documents] -- October 22, 1871
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    Rev. Dr. Kohler from Detroit, desires to know whether or not he should come here the beginning of November to enter upon his duties as minister of the congregation.

    It was then moved and carried unanimously that a telegram should be sent at once to the Doctor, that it was the wish of all the members of the Board of Directors that he should enter upon his official duties with the Sinai Congregation on the first of November, next.

    Moved and carried that a committee be appointed to procure a place of worship by the first of November.

    Rev. Dr. Kohler from Detroit, desires to know whether or not he should come here the beginning of November to enter upon his duties as minister of the congregation. It ...

    Jewish
    IV
  • [Association documents] -- October 22, 1871
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    The following resolution was offered......(and) was unanimously carried. Whereas our worthy President Mr. G. Eliel has been a great sufferer in the late conflagration, the raging flames having visited his house, store and factory, and whereas Mr. G. Eliel is endeared to us for his great devotion to the congregation, and we have learned him to be a kind-hearted and wholesouled man, therefore be it:

    Resolved: That the Board of Directors deeply regrets the misfortune which has befallen their president and hereby express their heartfelt sympathy for him and his family.....

    The following resolution was offered......(and) was unanimously carried. Whereas our worthy President Mr. G. Eliel has been a great sufferer in the late conflagration, the raging flames having visited his ...

    Jewish
    IV, II A 2
  • Chicago Times -- October 24, 1871
    No Nonsense

    The talk about Mr. Henry Greenebaum as Mayor of Chicago is ridiculous. If it were not probably intended merely as a joke, apropos of the conflagration, it would be abominable. It is not necessary to point out the utter impropriety of suggesting any such unfit person as Mr. H. Greenebaum for an office which, in this emergency, demands the highest order of abilities, the most comprehensive understanding, and the most unquestionable purity and integrity.

    The talk about Mr. Henry Greenebaum as Mayor of Chicago is ridiculous. If it were not probably intended merely as a joke, apropos of the conflagration, it would be abominable. ...

    Jewish
    IV
  • [Association documents] -- October 29, 1871
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    Report of the Committee on Place of Worship stating that a certain Jno. H. Ross had rented Standard Hall, but the Board of Directors of the hall reserved the right for the use of the Sinai Congregation.

    Moved and carried, that the committee shall take further charge of the matter and see that the privilege be reserved for the congregation in the lease, and that a pulpit be provided.

    Moved and carried to appoint a committee to see that a melodeon be temporarily procured for our worships and that the choir and leader be notified to attend the worship as usual.

    Report of the Committee on Place of Worship stating that a certain Jno. H. Ross had rented Standard Hall, but the Board of Directors of the hall reserved the right ...

    Jewish
    III C, V B, I B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 01, 1871
    [Sermon on the Chicago Fire before the Sinai Community]

    At the corner of Wabash Avenue and Peck Court a house of worship is situated. About a year ago the house had been changed from a church into a synagogue. Last Saturday it saw within its walls a curious gathering. Dr. Chronik gave a sermon of penitance that was worthy of the world-historic event that formed its theme. Among those present were many members of Mount Sinai Community whose synagogue was destroyed by the conflagration. Many of them had stood at the top of the business world before the Fire. Now they must begin over again on the lowest rung of the ladder.

    It was an immensely difficult task. Dr. Chronik showed himself equal to it. He did not change his well-known viewpoints; on the contrary, he lifted his audience up to them with a colossal exertion. He saw in the great conflagration, not a divine punishment for sinners; he did not inject the elementary forces from the outside into the "moral" aspect of the conflagration. "The 2ethical meaning of the catastrophe lay, first of all," said Dr. Chronik, "in the fact that it opens our eyes and irresistibly tells us that we did not use the material goods which we received in so large a measure, and that we neglected the spiritual for the material. We have been unworthy administrators of the goods entrusted to us. This feeling embittered our loss." This part of the sermon was executed brilliantly. It should be heeded not only by Israelites. We regretted that Dr. Chronik did not dwell upon this theme longer. For the same reason we would regret if, at this moment, when a "new departure" has to be taken by all of us--a spiritual one at that--Dr. Chronik, a man and a knight of the spirit, should be lost to our city. May we, just now, be spared such a loss!

    At the corner of Wabash Avenue and Peck Court a house of worship is situated. About a year ago the house had been changed from a church into a synagogue. ...

    Jewish
    I C, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 01, 1871
    (No headline)

    While workers and handicraftsmen immediately start to lay the foundation of a new home, and every morning emerge from their provisory shacks to go to work, the petite bourgeoisie (uder kleine Mittelstand) is in a predicament from which nothing but help from outside can lead them. All the small shopkeepers, inn-keepers, and clerks have lost through the fire their means of existence; on claims against insurance companies, that frequently can be realized only by way of court actions. No new existence can be founded ... with the practical attitude characteristic of them. The Israelites have been essayed a solution on October 15, by nominating a special committee whose task will be to collect money among the Israelites of other cities. This money is not to be used to alleviate the need of the present moment, but for the reconstruction of the enterprise of the small Israelite business people. Permanent help is in the end cheaper than temporary, that has constantly to be repeated. It is better to give a man a chance, through a gift of $50, to again make his living, than to have to protect him against freezing and starvation, all through the winter, with $3 or $4 a week. Of course, in granting relief by such larger sums, it is necessary to employ the utmost caution and to dispose of genuine knowledge of human character. The Israelites who, in their charity work, were always inclined toward the described principle, are perhaps better prepared for its application in the present emergency than others. The German Aid Society, the lodges, the craft associations, 2likewise possess some or all of the pre-suppositions and information necessary for the application of this policy. They should make the support of the special cases, the permanent removal of neediness through the expenditure of larger sums, their main task. It is true that this will make more work than the distribution of daily rations, but its effect will be permanent and a far greater blessing.

    While workers and handicraftsmen immediately start to lay the foundation of a new home, and every morning emerge from their provisory shacks to go to work, the petite bourgeoisie (uder ...

    Jewish
    II D 10
  • [Association documents] -- November 05, 1871
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    Moved and carried that the committee on procuring a place of worship, try to secure Olivet Presbyterian church, for next Sabbath and get terms for the future.....Moved and carried that invitation be sent the Zion Congregation to participate in the service and inaugural sermon of Dr. Kohler, also to ask Zion Congregation to let us have the use of their choir for next Saturday.

    Moved and carried that the committee on procuring a place of worship, try to secure Olivet Presbyterian church, for next Sabbath and get terms for the future.....Moved and carried that ...

    Jewish
    V B, III C, III B 3 b
  • [Association documents] -- November 19, 1871
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    A quorum being present, a motion was made to suspend the rules in order to accept the petition of Leon Mandel for membership. Carried....Leon Mandel was then elected member of the Chicago Sinai Congregation.

    A quorum being present, a motion was made to suspend the rules in order to accept the petition of Leon Mandel for membership. Carried....Leon Mandel was then elected member of ...

    Jewish
    IV
  • [Association documents] -- November 26, 1871
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    M. Mayer and G. Foreman, Committee on School Room reported that the school rooms of Laz. Silverman, now in the hands of K. A. M. Congregation, can be had, Moved and carried to send a communication to K. A. M., that the Sinai Congregation express their thanks for the temporary use of the rooms, and is willing to share the payment of any rents, which the K. A. M. may have to pay.

    M. Mayer and G. Foreman, Committee on School Room reported that the school rooms of Laz. Silverman, now in the hands of K. A. M. Congregation, can be had, Moved ...

    Jewish
    I A 2 a, III C
  • Chicago Times -- December 10, 1871
    The Jewish Relief Work

    It is estimated that though our Jewish citizens have lost not less than $20,000,000, they immediately after the fire took systematic measures to provide for the relief of those of their brethren who had been burned out. The result of these measures was that though there are 15,000 Jews in Chicago, not one of them has been seen to ask for aid of the general or special relief committees of the Gentile.

    The lodges of B'nai-Israel of this city at once made an appeal to the brethren throughout the United States, which was literally responded to; $18,000 having been received here, and distributed among the needy, up to November 5. In order, however, to furnish permanent relief for the suffering families of Israelities, $50,000 more are required, and it is hoped that this will be furnished by the Jews throughout the country.

    It is estimated that though our Jewish citizens have lost not less than $20,000,000, they immediately after the fire took systematic measures to provide for the relief of those of ...

    Jewish
    II D 10