The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • [Association documents] -- October 22, 1871
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    The following resolution was offered......(and) was unanimously carried. Whereas our worthy President Mr. G. Eliel has been a great sufferer in the late conflagration, the raging flames having visited his house, store and factory, and whereas Mr. G. Eliel is endeared to us for his great devotion to the congregation, and we have learned him to be a kind-hearted and wholesouled man, therefore be it:

    Resolved: That the Board of Directors deeply regrets the misfortune which has befallen their president and hereby express their heartfelt sympathy for him and his family.....

    The following resolution was offered......(and) was unanimously carried. Whereas our worthy President Mr. G. Eliel has been a great sufferer in the late conflagration, the raging flames having visited his ...

    Jewish
    IV, II A 2
  • Chicago Tribune -- September 22, 1877
    Greenebaum's

    Nobody need go over to Henry Greenebaum's bank, the German Saving Bank, and expect to see ominous lives of people, with pass-books in hand, pressing forward and jostling one another to get the first place at the payingteller's window. There is no run, nor any of its attendant features. While a reporter was there yesterday morning, just three persons came in and interviewed the methodical teller. The bank is paying out in cases of necessity, but requires of all its customers, who are actuated by the merely panicky feeling, the usual 30 days' notice. The enforcement of the notice-rule is no new thing, no recent contrivance, to avoid any sudden depletion of the bank's funds. It has been the custom of the bank since 1870 to insist on the observance of this requirement, and the fact that it is observed now, raises no excitement, and business goes on as usual.

    2

    Mr. Greenebaum was not only not at all scared yesterday but was in the most jubilant mood. "We are here," said he to the reporter, "and intend to remain here to do business. We have never advertised for depositors, but they have come to us - all we want. We are now carrying some 3,000 accounts, and they don't trouble us in the least. When a depositor comes in here and actually needs his money, we give him all he wants. Of the others we require the 30 days' notice, as we have done for years back. At the end of the 30 days' we shall pay them their money."

    "Have you been obliged to dispose of any of your securities and convert them into cash to meet your drafts?"

    "I am selling mortgages, I might say, all the time, and at premium. The fact is, I am making money all the time. We have managed to bank carefully, if I do say it, and the present excitement gives us no fears. We can meet all our obligations and intend to go ahead and do business."

    And the bustling little banker walked off to attend to a business transaction in which he probably proposed to do what he told the reporter he was doing, make money.

    Nobody need go over to Henry Greenebaum's bank, the German Saving Bank, and expect to see ominous lives of people, with pass-books in hand, pressing forward and jostling one another ...

    Jewish
    II A 2
  • Chicago Tribune -- December 08, 1877
    Henry Greenebaum

    When it became known at the bank that the concern would be put into the hands of a Receiver, the small army of depositors who were to draw out money, and had been told that they could not get,it, looked a little blue about the gills, so to speak, but the more intelligent of them had little to say, except that they believed Mr. Greenebaum had done the best that he could; that they were sorry for him, and especially for themselves, and that they had no doubt the best thing that could be done for the bank was to turn it over to a Receiver, and let him wind it up. There were others among them who couldn't understand it. They appeared to be a good deal dazed, and sat around on the hard benches, or stood up in little knots around the room, asking each other what it all meant. By-and-by it began to dawn on them that the bank would pass out of Mr. Greenebaum's hands, and into the hands of the Court.

    When it became known at the bank that the concern would be put into the hands of a Receiver, the small army of depositors who were to draw out money, ...

    Jewish
    II A 2, IV
  • Chicago Tribune -- December 08, 1877
    The Greenebaum Banks Proceedings in Court

    The casual visitor at the German Savings Bank yesterday morning would probably have noticed the rather protracted absence of its President, Mr. Greenebaum, but, unless he happened to be in a somewhat inquisitive frame of mind, would not have remarked upon it as a thing to excite wonder or surprise. But there are other people under the sun besides casual visitors, and a reporter with even an ordinarily well trained nose for news, reminding himself of the rumors prevalent for a few days back that Mr. Greenebaum's troubles had not ended with the suspension of the German National, but would probably be supplemented by trouble in the savings bank, put this and that together, and before long discovered that the President's withdrawal from that famous back room did indeed mean something. If the casual visitor alluded to had passed along the hall in the City Building, opposite Judge Moore's court room, a few minutes before 12 o'clock, he would have seen the aforesaid bank President, looking somewhat worried, and holding hurried conversations with Mr. John Woodbridge, the lawyer, and a young gentleman by the name of Simeon Strauss, an employe of the bank, who has charge of the mortgage business, and who writes attorney-at-law after his name.

    2

    The trio were evidently waiting for something, and it did not take the ubiquitous reporter long to ascertain in what direction the wind blew. At just 2 o'clock, he learned, Mr. Woodbridge would appear before Judge Moore, remind him of an appointment for that hour, and proceed to ask that a Receiver be appointed for the German Savings Bank, his request being backed up by certain representations concocted in due legal form by a certain Herman G. Berls and Frederika Berls, depositors in the aforesaid institution. Further inquiry elicited the information that the bank people, aware that they would have a hard road to travel if they persevered in keeping the institution open, would make no opposition to the bill, but would quietly let the matter take its course. Notice of the move on the part of the two depositors had been communicated to them at about 10 o'clock, and the interim had been spent in interviews between Mr. Greenebaum and the lawyers, in the course of which he had come to this decision. By the time the reporter had posted himself on the preliminaries, the hands of the watches and clocks in the City-Hall which manifested any proper regard for regularity indicated that the hour of 12 had arrived, and a few minutes later the three incessant talkers aforesaid, joined by several others who represented depositors and who had been informed as to what was going on, presented themselves before Judge Moore, and the court proceedings in the case of the German Savings Bank began.

    The casual visitor at the German Savings Bank yesterday morning would probably have noticed the rather protracted absence of its President, Mr. Greenebaum, but, unless he happened to be in ...

    Jewish
    II A 2, IV
  • Chicago Tribune -- May 26, 1878
    The Greenebaum Compromise

    Judge Blodgett yesterday decided the objections to the composition of twenty-five per cent which was offered by Henry Greenebaum & Company, and Henry Greenebaum individually. The chief ground of the objection was that Mrs. Elias Greenebaum had some property belonging rightly to her husband, which ought to be given up, and that Henry Greenebaum had made preferential payments and transfers, which, if set aside, would enable the creditors to get more from the estates.

    The Judge, in deciding the objections, gave a lengthy account of the troubles of the bankrupts, all of which are already well known. He said that, before the question of accepting the composition was taken up, the creditors had abundant opportunity to examine the bankrupts, accounts. They had had an expert also, and the composition meeting was once adjourned for the sole purpose of giving the Committee time to examine the books. The bankrupts had been engaged extensively in business, and their schedules showed their creditors to be 754 in number, of which 386 were creditors for over $50. The total amount of the liabilities scheduled amounted to $442,137.55. The number of creditors present at the composition meeting was 114, representing debts to the amount of $218,000. The composition offer was twenty-five percent - five per cent cash, ten percent in one year, and ten percent 2in two years, the deferred payments to be evidenced by the joint and individual notes of the bankrupts and secured by a bond for $100,000 to be approved by a committee of creditors. This offer was accepted by a vote of 114 to 14, the objectors only representing $34,000. The composition was afterward approved by 270 of the creditors, representing $322,000.

    Judge Blodgett yesterday decided the objections to the composition of twenty-five per cent which was offered by Henry Greenebaum & Company, and Henry Greenebaum individually. The chief ground of the ...

    Jewish
    II A 2, IV
  • Jewish Advance -- June 14, 1878
    (No headline)

    On Sunday, June 2, a monument was set on the grave of Jacob Pieser, the well-known member of the Chamber of Commerce, who died in this City a year ago. .... There was a good attendance of the members of the B'nai Sholon Congregation.

    On Sunday, June 2, a monument was set on the grave of Jacob Pieser, the well-known member of the Chamber of Commerce, who died in this City a year ago. ...

    Jewish
    IV, III C, II A 2
  • Jewish Advance -- September 13, 1878
    Just Out! New Years' Cards

    We have a fine selection of CHROMATIC NEW YEARS' CARDS - of Novel and Unique Designs

    Max Stern, Goldsmith & Co. 84 and 86 5th Avenue Chicago, Illinois

    (Adv.)

    We have a fine selection of CHROMATIC NEW YEARS' CARDS - of Novel and Unique Designs Max Stern, Goldsmith & Co. 84 and 86 5th Avenue Chicago, Illinois (Adv.)

    Jewish
    II A 2
  • Chicago Tribune -- October 06, 1878
    Henry Greenebaum A Charge of Embezzlement

    One of the events of yesterday was the arrest of Henry Greenebaum, the ex-banker and Park Commissioner, on the criminal charge of stealing $225,000. The complaining witness was T. B. Weber, of the firm of G. T. Weber & Co. The arrest was made upon the complaint of Mr. Weber, which was filed with Justice Foote during the day. The complaint is a lengthy document, and recites that complainant had been a stockholder in the German Savings and German National Banks, and had been in Europe about two years. Upon returning some two weeks ago he set about looking into the Greenebaum failure, and found from the books enough upon which to predicate the prosecution. The books show, it is claimed, without going into detail, that Greenebaum, just prior to the failure, withdrew valuable securities held by the banks to the amount of $225,000 and replaced them with real-estate securities valued at less than one-half the value of those withdrawn. Among the securities withdrawn were West Park bonds to the amount of $25,000, and all were withdrawn without the knowledge or consent of the Directors of the banks.

    Mr. Greenebaum was brought into court about 4 o'clock, accompanied by Judge Otis, his attorney, while Col. Juessen appeared for Mr. Weber. The complaint was looked 2into, and Greenebaum asked for a continuance. Col. Juessen resisted the application and urged that if it was granted that the bond should be fixed at $50,000. Judge Otis thought $500 would be sufficient bond, and Greenebaum insisted that owing to his past honorable record, reputation, and well-known financial ability, he ought to be let off on his own recognizance. The Court thought differently, however, and, granting a continuance of the hearing until the 15, fixed the bond at $25,000, which was given, John Herting becoming his surety.

    One of the events of yesterday was the arrest of Henry Greenebaum, the ex-banker and Park Commissioner, on the criminal charge of stealing $225,000. The complaining witness was T. B. ...

    Jewish
    II A 2, IV
  • Chicago Tribune -- October 23, 1878
    Henry Greenebaum

    The Greenebaum trial was resumed before Justice D'Wolf yesterday morning at 10 o'clock. The testimony for the defense was begun: Abraham Wise was the first witness called. He was Cashier of the German Savings Bank.

    Col. Juessen interrupted proceedings here by asking the witness be sworn according to the Jewish fashion. Considerable discussion arose upon the subject, which was finally settled by the witness stating that he knew of no oath more binding than that "by the everliving God," and he was allowed to proceed.

    The trial was adjourned until this morning at 10 o'clock.

    The Greenebaum trial was resumed before Justice D'Wolf yesterday morning at 10 o'clock. The testimony for the defense was begun: Abraham Wise was the first witness called. He was Cashier ...

    Jewish
    IV, II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 03, 1879
    Free Sons of Israel

    This old Order was founded in the East where it is well known, and a few years ago the Society organized a branch in Chicago, where the benevolence accorded to its poor and sick members, as well as the help to their widows and orphans, and the decent burials of the dead, give convincing proof of its humanitarian spirit. There are eight lodges of this Order in Chicago at present, and it was decided three years ago that the Order should have its own cemetery; as a consequence thereof, five and one-half acres of land were bought near Waldheim (Forest Home). Through an assessment of five dollars on each member, the first payments were made, a fence was erected, a caretaker's house was built, and trees were planted, etc.

    The administration in charge of the burial ground is called the Cemetery Association of the Free Sons [of Israel], and it consists of three delegates from each lodge. Thus far, only a few family burial plots have been sold and the Association, therefore, is confronted with large debts. [In order to remedy this situation] the Cemetery Association resolved to hold a fair 2at Uhlich's Hall, from March 2 to 9, in order to pay off the mortgage. The general public is requested to give generous support to this philanthropic endeavor, and, particularly, not to let the various committee members, who are entrusted with collections, go away empty-handed when they come seeking articles for the fair.

    The Esther Lodge, a ladies auxiliary club of the Order, has already shown active interest and obtained gratifying results, which will do much in making the fair an outstanding as well as a financial success.

    This old Order was founded in the East where it is well known, and a few years ago the Society organized a branch in Chicago, where the benevolence accorded to ...

    Jewish
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3, I D 1 b, II A 2, II D 1, II F