The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Magyar Tribune -- March 23, 1917
    Theatrical Play Given for the Aid of War Cripples

    On March 27, The South Side Good Will Society will present a very beautiful and interesting play at the Pythian Temple located at 9231 Cottage Grove Avenue. The profits from this performance will be used for the relief of those crippled in the war.

    On March 27, The South Side Good Will Society will present a very beautiful and interesting play at the Pythian Temple located at 9231 Cottage Grove Avenue. The profits from ...

    Hungarian
    II B 1 c 1, II D 10, I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 23, 1917
    Immigration

    The United States immigration authorities recently released the statistics with reference to immigration into the United States. These statistics showed that the United States received 24,745 immigrants in the month of January of this year. Last year this country received 298,826 immigrants.

    During the month of January the immigration consisted of 211 Hungarians, they were all women and children, 1,020 Germans, 3,397 English, 321 French, and 400 from Mexico.

    The United States immigration authorities recently released the statistics with reference to immigration into the United States. These statistics showed that the United States received 24,745 immigrants in the month ...

    Hungarian
    III G
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 30, 1917
    Masses Acquire Citizenship

    Since the first of February when the United States broke its diplomatic relationship with Germany, there has been a noticeable increase in the number of people who desire to become American citizens. In one and a half months time there were 10,914 first papers issued, and at the same time there were 1,952 second papers issued and thereby creating as many new citizens. Of the new citizens that were naturalized 80 per cent were Germans, Hungarians and Austrians.

    In the entire year of 1916 there were 13,766 first papers, and 7, 870 second papers issued.

    Since the first of February when the United States broke its diplomatic relationship with Germany, there has been a noticeable increase in the number of people who desire to become ...

    Hungarian
    III A, I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 30, 1917
    Safety of Foreign Wealth (Editorial)

    A decision is up before the congress of the United States with regards to entering the war. This decision is giving the German people of this country considerable worry and this situation has also caused the Hungarian people to be worried to some extent. Since this country broke relationship with Germany, the German people in a couple of cities in the United States have become worried, and have taken all their savings out of the bank.

    Therefore the President of the United States has seen fit to make an announcement, that even if this country does go to war with a foreign power, the wealth of foreigners in this country will be safe.

    The President of the United States has learned that there has been a rumor among the foreign population of the United States that if war breaks out with any 2particular nation, the people of that nation living in this country will have their property and savings in the banks confiscated by the government. Therefore the President has authorized the Secretary of State to make an announcement that these rumors are false and that there is no cause for the people to worry.

    The government of the United States under no circumstances will use the war situation as a reason for confiscating wealth in this country. The government will protect foreign property in this country just as it will protect the property of the citizens of this country.

    This means that property and bank savings of Hungarians living in the United States are and will be just as safe in time of war as they were in time of peace.

    This announcement will cause a better feeling towards the government by both the citizens of this country and non citizens.

    3

    We ask that you do not listen to anyone, who is spreading fear and dissatisfaction. No one should rush the banks or leave his present place of employment.

    No one should get excited over the present situation and everyone must feel that the situation will be cleared up to the satisfaction of everyone.

    A decision is up before the congress of the United States with regards to entering the war. This decision is giving the German people of this country considerable worry and ...

    Hungarian
    I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 06, 1917
    Spring Dance

    The Chicago Independent Ladies Aid Lodge will sponsor a spring festival dance on April 14, 1917 at Schoenhofen's Hall.

    A cordial invitation is extended to all good Hungarians to attend this dance. The price of admission is only twenty-five cents.

    The entire profits from this dance will be used for charitable purposes.

    The Chicago Independent Ladies Aid Lodge will sponsor a spring festival dance on April 14, 1917 at Schoenhofen's Hall. A cordial invitation is extended to all good Hungarians to attend ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, III B 2
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 06, 1917
    Warning

    We do hereby urge those Hungarians who are not citizens of the United States, to adhere strictly to laws of the United States.

    Every Hungarian citizen should guard against critizing Congress and the President of the United States in regard to their action on the war situation. Free speech is not the privilege of those who are only guests of this country.

    The only ones that have a right to criticize the acts of the President and Congress are the people of the United States who are citizens of the United States.

    To those of us who are only guests of the United States, the war between the allies and Germany is of no concern. We should keep to our usual business and avoid dissention among our fellow-workers with reference to the war question.

    We do hereby urge those Hungarians who are not citizens of the United States, to adhere strictly to laws of the United States. Every Hungarian citizen should guard against critizing ...

    Hungarian
    I G, I J
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 14, 1917
    Illinois Hungarian Ladies Sick Benefit Lodge

    Under the above name a new ladies sick benefit lodge has been organized. The organization took place on March the 8th, with a charter membership of thirty-eight, most of whom were residents of West Pullman. The South Side Hungarian ladies have shown considerable interest in this new organization.

    Election of officers took place at the regular meeting held for the month of April. The results were as follows: Mrs. John Movotz was elected president, Mrs. Steven Szilvagyi, vice president; Mrs. Julius Csaszav, secretary. Mrs. Irme Szabadosh,corresponding secretary, and Miss Mary Schmidlfall, comptroller.

    Every Hungarian lady may become a member of this organization. The initiation fee is $1.50,regular dues are 50 cents per month, and the lodge pays a sick benefit of $5.00 per week in case of sickness. The age limit is fifteen to forty-five years. Meetings are held the first Thursday of each month at 2 P.M. in Gemmler Hall.

    Under the above name a new ladies sick benefit lodge has been organized. The organization took place on March the 8th, with a charter membership of thirty-eight, most of whom ...

    Hungarian
    II D 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 14, 1917
    Lectures in Chicago.

    The Hungarian College Club, representing the highest classes of Hungarians in Chicago, has a very exclusive membership, for it requires, of members joining, a college diploma.

    This organization passed a resolution at its last meeting to give instructions and advice to Hungarians, by means of lectures and readings, with reference to behavior in times of war. Thus they are trying to maintain that splendid reputation which the Hungarians have established in peace times among the American people. They are teaching Hungarians, who have become citizens, how to conduct themselves in reference to the war. Instructions will be given to those who wish to secure their naturalization papers, and also to those who have not as yet obtained their first papers. The latter will be taught what is expected of them, while the United States is at war.

    Likewise will advice be given to those who have surplus funds to invest, showing them how to place investments here, while such are barred in foreign countries.

    2

    The first lecture took place last Tuesday at Burnside; the next will be held in West Pullman. These lectures, apparently, meet with the approval of the Hungarians, because quite a number attended the last one.

    The Hungarian College Club, representing the highest classes of Hungarians in Chicago, has a very exclusive membership, for it requires, of members joining, a college diploma. This organization passed a ...

    Hungarian
    II B 2 g, II B 1 d, III A, I A 3, I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 21, 1917
    Dressmakers Strike

    For more than two months, now, the Ladies Dressmakers Union has been on strike. This strike involves close to 8,000 workers. The union wants recognition; they demand that the working hours be cut; they also demand a raise in salary. The workers believe they will win the strike. The striking ladies ask all Hungarian women not to accept jobs in the plants that are on strike-in other words, not be strike breakers.

    For more than two months, now, the Ladies Dressmakers Union has been on strike. This strike involves close to 8,000 workers. The union wants recognition; they demand that the working ...

    Hungarian
    I D 2 a 4
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 21, 1917
    The Ten Commandments for Immigrants in Time of War (Editorial)

    I

    You must never forget that no one asked you to come to the United States. You came here of your own free will to make a better living and to save a few nickels for your old age.

    II

    When you stepped on the shore of the United States you were on free soil. No one asked you what you were doing here, and no one stood in your way. It was up to you and you only what you were going to do in this country. The nation immediately became your friend. You received the respect due to a guest when you entered the United States. Respect your host, and your host will respect you.

    2

    III

    Keep your thoughts to yourself. Maybe the pope knows everything, but you are not a pope, and this does not mean that you know more than he does.

    IV

    Do not get involved in any arguments in public places.

    V

    For six days do your work and attend to your duties. On the seventh day rest; that is what the Lord intended you to do. Six days out of the week are for labor, and during this time you should think of nothing but your duties. If you are engaged in respectable work, you will be considered a law-abiding citizen, so work for six days, and on the seventh day of the week devote your time to rest and to your family.

    3

    VI

    Do not take part in any political movement. Trust the people whose duty it is to think for you. Be satisfied, for you will not be able to change things anyway. In war unity means strength.

    VII

    Have respect for the laws of the country which provides your daily bread. The laws defend your interests. Every law has a purpose. You must be familiar with the laws, and you must obey them.

    VIII

    Do not carry on your person any kind of firearm or other deadly weapon. Your only weapon of defense should be your self-respect.

    4

    IX

    Keep your savings in the same place in which you had them in time of peace. Money should be kept in a bank and not on one's person or at the place where one lives. You yourself cannot guard your money so well as the bank can. The laws of this country insure that what is yours is yours only. Regardless of what the future may bring, your wealth will not be threatened by disaster in the United States.

    X

    Love your neighbor. All men are equal regardless of creed and nationality. We all came from the same parentage originally, and we are all brothers and sisters. After the World War will come brotherly love among the nations of the world. It is for this purpose that this country is fighting. No one asks you for sacrifice in this war; therefore you can lead a life of peace and happiness if you keep to the straight and narrow path.

    I You must never forget that no one asked you to come to the United States. You came here of your own free will to make a better living and ...

    Hungarian
    I G, III A