The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- March 21, 1879
    The Hungarian Relief

    Mayor Heath has issued an address to the people of Chicago, reminding them of the fact that in October, 1871, the contribution of HUNGARY,to the relief of the homeless and hungry sufferers of this city,amounted to $12,000. A good portion of this was doubtless furnished by the inhabitants of SZEGEDIN, the second commercial city of the KINGDOM. The terrible distress into which these people have been plunged in consequence of the recent floods calls for a reciprocation by Chicago of their abundant charity, it is therefore proper that the attention of our people should be directed to the matter in an offical manner. The DEAK VEREIN, a HUNGARIAN society in this city, has assumed the task of receiving and forwarding such contributions as may be offered Chicago should give a good account of itself in this HUNGARIAN relief movement. There is little danger that more will be given than is needed to provide for the 80,000 people reduced to destitution by the flood.

    Mayor Heath has issued an address to the people of Chicago, reminding them of the fact that in October, 1871, the contribution of HUNGARY,to the relief of the homeless and ...

    Hungarian
    III H, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 24, 1879
    The Deak Club

    The Deak Club held its meeting, as announced, at the Sherman House, at three o'clock in the afternoon, with Mr. Kiss presiding.

    At the beginning of the session a brief account of the Club's activity with respect to aid for the flood sufferers in Szegedin, Hungary, was given; also the proposed concert, on April 5, at Farwell Hall, was considered. According to the Club's plan, five thousand tickets are to be printed; general admission will be fifty cents, reserved seats a dollar each. The rent for the hall amounts to thirty-five dollars. The suggestion resulted in an extensive debate which ended in a resolution to await the reply of Mr. Remenyi [violinist], before deciding on the concert.

    The reports of the various collection committees show that $1333 has been received.

    2

    Mr. Logan was requested to approach the wholesale dealers and seek contributions. Messrs. Kornhausen and Peabody offered to see the liquor dealers. Every committee was then given authority to add members to its staff.

    As heretofore, the newspapers are to be notified every evening about the day's collections. Mr. Pick made a motion to ask a newspaper and a bank to issue an appeal for aid, and to accept contributions. He suggested the Illinois Staats-Zeitung and Tribune. Mr. Peabody wanted the First National Bank to be chosen for the purpose. The chairman was opposed. The motion was made, [it was explained] because many people are willing to help, but do not know whom to see about it.

    Mr. Peabody then made a motion that the collected money should be sent to the mayor of Budapest. The president then declared that, should such a procedure be adopted recognition for all this work would be given to Chicago, and not to the Club, precisely as happened several years ago, when money was 3sent to Pest. The meeting was then adjourned until next Sunday.

    The Deak Club held its meeting, as announced, at the Sherman House, at three o'clock in the afternoon, with Mr. Kiss presiding. At the beginning of the session a brief ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, III B 2
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 14, 1879
    Szegedin Relief Fund

    The Deak Society into whose hands was placed the collections for the suffering people of Szegedin, Hungary, met yesterday afternoon at the Relief Society Building, No. 51 and 53 La Salle Street.

    The President, Mr. F. Kiss, presided, and in opening the meeting stated that out of the funds collected for the Szegedin sufferers, $3,360 had been invested in a draft for 8,000 florins payable to Mr. Kalman Tissa, the President of the Hungarian Ministry, and that the draft was sent to its destination. There still remained in the hands of the Society $46 applicable to the charity.

    Since it was understood that no further collections would be made, several of the 2gentlemen who had lent their time and energies to the worthy cause presented their books and accounts, showing the names of contributors and the amounts given, and asked that they be examined and reported upon by a committee appointed for the purpose.

    Mr. J. Kune offered a resolution thanking the President and the Directors of the Board of Trade for courtesies extended and facilities granted for carrying on the work.

    The resolution was adopted.

    The Deak Society into whose hands was placed the collections for the suffering people of Szegedin, Hungary, met yesterday afternoon at the Relief Society Building, No. 51 and 53 La ...

    Hungarian
    III H, II D 10
  • Die Fackel -- April 06, 1884
    (No headline)

    The popular singing society "Fidelia" will give a concert tonight in the North Side Turnhalle which, no doubt will prove the most interesting of any heard this winter. The famous Hungarian Gypsy Orchestra has been won for this occasion.

    The following program will give the reader a view of the enjoyment to be expected:

    "Rakoczy March" Czinka
    "Husar Ciny" (The Jolly Hussar) Vidi Karoly

    Hungarian Gypsy Orchestra

    "In the Forest," Men's Choir and Tenor Solo F. Mobring
    "Csak Egyszepleany van a Vilagon" (The Most Beautiful Girl in the World) Kokas Janos

    Hungarian Gypsy Orchestra

    "The Own Heart," Solo and Quartet J. Schafer, Messrs. I. Klaussen, Chr. Carr, T. Carr, L. Nettelhorst
    2
    Violin Solo, Hungarian Selections Franz Garay
    "Heaven in the Valley," Song for Tenor Marschner

    Mr. Alexander Bischoff

    "Wine Drinking," A Jolly Duet for Baritone L'arrange Messrs. T. Carr and L. Nettelhorst
    "Csip Meg Mogyar," (Prick Him, Fly) Samu

    Two Popular Songs:

    a) Everything Is Beautiful
    b) I Have to Leave Tomorrow

    Fidelia

    Cymbal Solo
    "Czardas Hungarian" Vidi Karoly

    Hungarian Gypsy Orchestra

    We hope that the Board of Directors will be rewarded for its efforts to offer such a program by a large participation by the public.

    The popular singing society "Fidelia" will give a concert tonight in the North Side Turnhalle which, no doubt will prove the most interesting of any heard this winter. The famous ...

    Hungarian
    II A 3 b, II B 1 a
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 08, 1917
    Hungarian American Women.

    We Hungarian Americans owe certain duties to the United States government regardless of whether we be men or women. Men or women, the United States takes care of us, whether in time of peace or war. The United States does not regard the men or women as enemies of this country. From this point of view we think it necessary that the Hungarian American women take part in patriotic movements in this country.

    One way that the Hungarian American women can show their colors is by joining the Loyalty League. By joining the league you can show your appreciation and good patriotism for the protection and equality granted you during this war.

    The Hungarian American women must think of the fact that their husbands have been given the opportunities to earn their own daily bread and amply provide for their families.

    The Hungarian American women must think of the fact that the Loyalty 2League is here to protect your husband and his family.

    The Hungarian American women must bear in mind the fact that this country is such a wonderful place to live in and the opportunities that it offers.

    After thinking all these things over it is very apparent that it is the duty of the Hungarian American woman to join, and become a faithful member of the Loyalty League.

    It is only natural that women would think about their homeland and wonder what is happening there, and in their own little communities from which they came to this country. By joining the league the Hungarian women can show the government and make them realize that the Hungarian population of America is doing its duty very patriotically. Perhaps by realizing this the government will open the channels for mail between this country and Hungary.

    Every Hungarian American woman should step into the Hungarian American Loyalty 3League. She owes this to herself and to her family and thereby lives up to the standards of good partiotism towards the United States government.

    We Hungarian Americans owe certain duties to the United States government regardless of whether we be men or women. Men or women, the United States takes care of us, whether ...

    Hungarian
    I K, I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 15, 1917
    March 15, Hungarian Independence Day

    The Chicago District First Hungarian Social and Benevolent Lodge will hold the national Hungarian Independence Day celebration.

    The program will consist of speeches by prominent men, soloists and choruses singing prominent folk songs. All good patriotic Hungarians are urged to be present.

    The Chicago District First Hungarian Social and Benevolent Lodge will hold the national Hungarian Independence Day celebration. The program will consist of speeches by prominent men, soloists and choruses singing ...

    Hungarian
    III B 3 a, II A 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 15, 1917
    Hungarians Victims of Hyenas

    The trusting and kind hearted Hungarians were very easy victims of the swindlers and had many hard earned dollars taken away from them.

    When immigration was at its height, the Hungarians thought that they were coming to this country as mere guests of America, therefore they did not think it necessary to learn to read and write the English language. There were, however, a few exceptions and out of these exception rose the swindling hyenas.

    The unfortunate immigrants could not look for work, they could not write English, they could not sell, they could not buy. In other words they could not do anything unless they consulted one of the people who could read and write both Hungarian and English.

    2

    The oldest and most profitable racket was the employment racket. When the poor foreigner came to this country he was very unfamiliar with working conditions. So these labor racketeers would sign them up as strike-breakers, or put them to work clearing forests or put them down in mines making them work under very unhealthy conditions, and the wages for the most of these jobs were nothing but slavery wages. But this kind of a racketeering is a thing of the past, mostly due to the fact that the Hungarian press and the government have gotten after them. But as this racket faded a new one took its place.

    The people gradually became acquainted with their surroundings and being of a thrifty class of people they began to save some money. So then racketeers invented new schemes to relieve the Hungarians of their wealth.

    With the development of fraternal organizations, such great depredations took place that these organizations remain as a sore spot in the hearts of the Hungarians. There was for example an organization that offered twenty-five dollars sick benefit and a 3policy worth five-hundred dollars in case of death. This was purely a fraudulent scheme. When the time came to collect, the policy proved to be nothing but a one dollar railroad ticket. We know of localities where as many as twenty-five families were involved, each family paying twenty-five dollars cash for this supposed protection.

    Now there are other rackets such as stocks and bonds, property that does not exist, and patent medicines. One of the greatest foes of these rackets, the one that has cut this racketeering down a great deal is the Hungarian Miners News.

    This racketeering not only hurt the wealth of the people but it also makes it hard for the legitimate business man to sell reputable product. Now the better class of business people are starting to recognize the value of the business that might be had from the Hungarians in Chicago and other Eastern cities. We think it necessary to mention the Union Pacific Railroad and Fred H. Bartlett Realty Company, who have 4lent a hand in doing away with the racketeering hyenas who preyed on the Hungarian people. These two organizations offered their services and are willing to give advice of any nature.

    We therefore urge the Hungarian people to learn from the experiences of others and do business with firms, organization doctors, that have a well established reputation. This article is meant to be an article to educate the Hungarian people to be on their guard against swindling hyenas.

    The trusting and kind hearted Hungarians were very easy victims of the swindlers and had many hard earned dollars taken away from them. When immigration was at its height, the ...

    Hungarian
    I H, II E 3, II E 2, II E 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 15, 1917
    Hungarian Business Man's Success

    Mr. Alex Schwartz is an up and coming Hungarian business man who owns the successful business enterprise known as the Original Hungarian Restaurant. He is located on Dearborn Street in downtown Chicago, and his restaurant is the favorite eating place for many of the prominent people of Chicago; doctors, lawyers, actors and actresses. They have made the restaurant their favorite meeting place. This establishment is patronized by Hungarians from far and wide. The Chicago Restaurant is the second one of its kind in the United States. Mr. Schwartz also has one in New York City.

    Mr. Alex Schwartz is an up and coming Hungarian business man who owns the successful business enterprise known as the Original Hungarian Restaurant. He is located on Dearborn Street in ...

    Hungarian
    II A 2, IV
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 15, 1917
    The Magyar Tribune (Editorial)

    This newspaper is a new publication, although the people of Chicago have heard something about it. After it is read the first time it will have become a true friend and neighbor to all who feel that they are Hungarians.

    The Magyar Tribune is two years old, formerly it has been known as, A Nep, and we are going to adhere to the same principles that the original newspaper followed, and that was, to help the Hungarians in their aims and purposes, help them become educated to the modes of this country.

    The small newspaper formerly known as, A Nep was too small to represent the great Hungarian population of Chicago. The Hungarian population of Chicago deserves just as much recognition from the press as the other nationalities have received.

    2

    We call our readers' attention to the fact that we will write about the different happenings in Hungary, but our American political viewpoints shall be governed by the belief of our readers, we will remain independent of any profiteering or religious organizations, but at the same time we want our readers to know that we are not opposing any of them.

    From now on we will stick to the above platform and we will be at the service of all our readers; we will present the viewpoints of our readers, whether it pertains to religion, politics organizations, or any news item pertaining to the interest of Hungarians living in Chicago.

    Our doctors, lawyers, and other professional friends will always be ready to help our subscribers.

    We the publishers trust that this much larger and better paper will be met by the Hungarians of Chicago with high acclaim.

    The Editors of Magyar Tribune.

    This newspaper is a new publication, although the people of Chicago have heard something about it. After it is read the first time it will have become a true friend ...

    Hungarian
    II B 2 d 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 23, 1917
    The Emigration Problem

    Previous to the war which has been going on for the past three years, many of us who never thought that we would go back to Hungary,are now thinking seriously of emigrating with the thought that after the war there will be a shortage of man power due to the great number that lost their lives or became cripples.

    There is some question as to whether the supposition is true. Does it seem probable that the Hungarians emigrating from this country, will be respected as good workers, and can they expect a livable wage for their work? Why did we come to this country? Was it not because there were too many of us in Hungary and we could not make a living there?

    As we learned in school, the natural resources of Hungary are silver, iron ore, and coal and easy transportation by water. Our immigration to this country was therefore not caused by Hungary's not having sufficient natural resources. The 2real reason seems to be political and lack of general wealth among the people, also lack of general and technical education. On account of these facts many of the people became surplus population in their particular line of work,and if a man did get a job he was 'pushed around' and constantly reminded, that if he did not like his job there were many others who would like it. Most particularly was this true of the agricultural worker. Most of them worked long hours for very low wages. Hungary is an agricultural country and most of its farm implements are manufactured in foreign countries; therefore industry absorbs very few or none of the employables.

    About the only place where industry and mining thrive and develop is in the agricultural regions where the owners can obtain cheap and ignorant help. This situation brings about a wandering class of workers. This type of workers has a tendency to retard the development of both agriculture and industry. We would think that the working class of people are at fault, but there is also a certain percentage of professional men involved; they cannot find work due to the fact that in Hungary the industries are so far behind in development. Such was the picture before the war started.

    3

    Even then the workers were beginning to realize that organization was necessary. They wanted shorter hours and more pay. But the Capitalists realized the ignorance of the people and created internal strife among them, so that these organizations were soon broken up.

    But now the war is nearing its end, and the people are fast realizing that they were not fighting and killing to save their own, but to save the property of those who had treated them so harshly. In Hungary the great land owners are the law makers and legislators. The people who fought for them must realize these facts, and they must demand their rights.

    The development of Hungary depends on the question of whether or not the people who fought in the war will have any rights. If the government provides regulations for livable wages for the agricultural workers, free press, and free and independent courts for the people, then perhaps the Hungarians in America might feel that it would be worth their while to go back to Hungary after the war is over.

    Previous to the war which has been going on for the past three years, many of us who never thought that we would go back to Hungary,are now thinking seriously ...

    Hungarian
    III G, I G, III H