The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Magyar Tribune -- March 08, 1917
    Hungarian American Women.

    We Hungarian Americans owe certain duties to the United States government regardless of whether we be men or women. Men or women, the United States takes care of us, whether in time of peace or war. The United States does not regard the men or women as enemies of this country. From this point of view we think it necessary that the Hungarian American women take part in patriotic movements in this country.

    One way that the Hungarian American women can show their colors is by joining the Loyalty League. By joining the league you can show your appreciation and good patriotism for the protection and equality granted you during this war.

    The Hungarian American women must think of the fact that their husbands have been given the opportunities to earn their own daily bread and amply provide for their families.

    The Hungarian American women must think of the fact that the Loyalty 2League is here to protect your husband and his family.

    The Hungarian American women must bear in mind the fact that this country is such a wonderful place to live in and the opportunities that it offers.

    After thinking all these things over it is very apparent that it is the duty of the Hungarian American woman to join, and become a faithful member of the Loyalty League.

    It is only natural that women would think about their homeland and wonder what is happening there, and in their own little communities from which they came to this country. By joining the league the Hungarian women can show the government and make them realize that the Hungarian population of America is doing its duty very patriotically. Perhaps by realizing this the government will open the channels for mail between this country and Hungary.

    Every Hungarian American woman should step into the Hungarian American Loyalty 3League. She owes this to herself and to her family and thereby lives up to the standards of good partiotism towards the United States government.

    We Hungarian Americans owe certain duties to the United States government regardless of whether we be men or women. Men or women, the United States takes care of us, whether ...

    Hungarian
    I K, I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 26, 1920
    Flag Dedication

    The Twentieth Century Ladies'Society had a grand celebration in connection with the dedication of a new Hungarian flag. This incident, since the organization of this society, indicates that they are enjoying the fruits of success, despite the fact that they are one of the youngest Hungarian organizations.

    Mrs. Lina Steiner was honored in being appointed Godmother to the flag. We regret that this newspaper did not receive a more detailed report of this affair. Consequently only a short article appears concerning it.

    The Twentieth Century Ladies'Society had a grand celebration in connection with the dedication of a new Hungarian flag. This incident, since the organization of this society, indicates that they are ...

    Hungarian
    III B 2, I K
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 11, 1921
    Meeting of Women's Benevolent Society

    The First Hungarian Women's Benevolent Society of Chicago and suburbs, and its associated society, held its February meeting recently. At this meeting, a discussion was held principally on the methods of handling the money in the Carol fund. The meeting was held on the second floor at 11405 Michigan Avenue. Mrs. Gabor Varga brought in four new members at this meeting.

    It would be a very good idea for every man and woman among the Hungarians in America to hold a contest between themselves which would result in increasing the memberships of the societies, instead of always criticizing each other, and providing alibis for themselves. If we could have our societies full of members like Mrs. Varga, then the Hungarian-American Societies would be the leading Societies in America.

    Without the full support of the members, the officers of the society are helpless. While the officers keep urging the members, results are shown. This is an important matter which none of us should forget.

    2

    For this reason, the reporter for this publication attended this meeting to bring the attention of the women to this important matter. After all, our paper is being published for all our readers, whose opinions and interests we must serve, and not for a few individuals.

    We trust that our old members, as well as the officers, after having learned their lesson from the past, will energetically work together in the interest of the society. We know that in this way we will be successful, and encourage other societies to follow.

    The First Hungarian Women's Benevolent Society of Chicago and suburbs, and its associated society, held its February meeting recently. At this meeting, a discussion was held principally on the methods ...

    Hungarian
    II D 1, I C, I K
  • Magyar Tribune -- September 26, 1924
    Hungarian Brotherly Love Please Give This a Thought. (Editorial)

    The change in economic conditions in the United States has naturally brought about some very difficult situations. These conditions have affected the Hungarian working people just as they have affected the rest of the nation. The present unemployment situation has harmed thousands of Hungarians.

    In the first place, there are those who have not been in this country very long and, therefore, they have not established themselves in industry, due to their lack of sufficient service; there are those who belong in the common laboring class, those who do not have a trade of any kind; then there are those who have little or no ambition and naturally are not wanted by industry.

    It is an absolute fact that there are thousands of Hungarians in Chicago who are unemployed and who are going hungry.

    After these unfortunate, breadless Hungarians have gone to the limit of their 2credit, which does not take long, they then are left destitute, common beggars.

    Can you visualize what a terrible situation it is, when an absolutely normal person must resort to begging in a foreign country? This fact is not imaginary because the Hungarian beggar has already made his appearance in the United States.

    Those who came here to the land of wealth have been cheated, and now, with bowed heads they visit Hungarian homes and beg. This is a very bitter situation, but it is not new.

    We older Americans know that before the war the Hungarian beggar visited Hungarian families and Hungarian organizations. Who can tell us how many letters asking for aid were received by Hungarian organizations and Hungarian businessmen of this city?

    Years ago, when economic conditions became bad and unemployment resulted, the 3Hungarian beggar appeared. In the past this movement was so great that some of the common beggars became regular professional beggars. There were those who regarded begging as a regular business: they worked the Hungarian districts of the cities from New York to San Francisco, with letters of recommendation, many of these letlers written under fictitious names. They begged from individuals as well as from Hungarian organizations.

    The war put a stop to this detrimental business of begging.

    The never-ceasing begging that took place before the war was so great that those Hungarians who were financially able organized lodges and societies to care for this situation. The main idea of these organizations was to see that those deserving aid received it.

    The members of these organizations did not receive any benefits; all they did was donate. These benevolent organizations existed in New York, Chicago, and Cleveland. The Chicago Hungarian Charitable Society was famous throughout the nation. This organization was highly respected and favored for the honest and 4indiscriminating work it performed.

    The Chicago Hungarian Charitable Society, after almost fifty years of active existence, disbanded during the war. There weren't enough needy people in this rich land of ours; therefore, there was no field for the society to work in. From the organization mentioned above, the Hungarian Charitable Ladies Society was formed. This Society centers its activities around cultural and social movements. Even today they are doing some wonderful work in their own exclusive circle.

    But the original aim of the Chicago Hungarian Charitable Society is lacking; even among its members the ever-increasing American ideas can be felt, although the membership consists of a large number of prominent Hungarians.

    Present conditions require the activities of the old Hungarian Charitable Society. There are a great number of Hungarians in and around Chicago who are in need of food, clothing, and shelter. All good Hungarian businessmen should give this careful thought. Through an organization such as this, work could be found for many. Aid received through an organization of this type, would be appreciated 5a lot more than aid from individuals.

    Today we have in Chicago a large group of influential Hungarians, who are both financially and socially prominent, and they could do a lot of good to help these unfortunate people.

    There are enough Hungarians in this city who could well afford to pay the yearly dues of ten dollars as was paid in the past by the members of the organization. There are many who could pay as high as two hundred dollars yearly.

    It is our idea that the time has come in Chicago when this group of beggars, and even more so those who are sitting back suffering quietly, should be taken care of by a regularly organized group of Hungarians. Those who are willing to aid financially should come out and put their arms around those sufferers, and help the more unfortunates across the deep ravines of starvation and hard times.

    This problem is a humanitarian duty, and it is needless to write more about it. This movement should be started, the sooner the better, because the hungry and ragged are at our doors, and there are many destitute Hungarians roaming the 6city streets. It is sorrowful, but we are satisfied that this is true.

    In the olden days, when the Austrian-Hungarian Empire existed, the Consul saw to it that aid was received from that government, because they had sufficient funds set aside for this purpose. It is useless to wait for such aid from the Hungarian Consul. Poverty is reigning in Hungary and it seems that they themselves will need help. We are left here alone to do this charitable work. We must bring this movement to life with our own strength, and start the work anew.

    This newspaper, keeping the interest of all Hungarians at heart, can be depended upon for a helping hand in promoting such a noble idea, but we will expect those Hungarians who know the value of this movement to help promote the idea and keep it from dying.

    The change in economic conditions in the United States has naturally brought about some very difficult situations. These conditions have affected the Hungarian working people just as they have affected ...

    Hungarian
    I D 2 c, I H, I K, I C, II D 1, II D 10, II B 2 d 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- October 30, 1924
    Mr. Menken Waves the Flag (Editorial)

    [Translator's note.--This editorial written with reference to an editorial which appeared in the New York World on October 28, 1924.]

    It is gratifying to find among our contemporaries writers of such intelligent, fairminded, and frank editorials as the one which appeared in the New York World. No doubt, the wise and courageous policy of its great editor, Joseph Pulitzer, now deceased, is not dead yet. The Hungarians in this country, as well as abroad, will notice that the powerful moulder of American public opinion, the world, has diagnosed the Hungarian governmental situation very precisely and correctly, and all the agents and hirelings of the Horthy regime, whether they are Americans like Mr. Menken or Hungarians, cannot mislead the intelligent Americans.

    2

    As much as we deplore the officiousness of the Security League by annoying Countess Karolyi upon her entrance to America, we consider it as a great publicity stunt to her American mission. While we are convinced that her political convictions are anti-Bolsheviki, her lectures will prove beyond doubt the nature and character of her American mission, and the great and glorious type of Hungarian womanhood Countess Karolyi represents.

    If Countess Karolyi's American visit would be the very least injurious to the genuine American spirit, or to our American free and liberal institution we would ourselves favor her deportation, as we do not like to see Hungarians knocking our adopted country and hurting the reputation of all of us, but we warmly welcome Countess Karolyi as a true representative of Hungarian democracy, and the finest prototype of Hungarian womanhood, a rare specimen among the aristocracy of old Hungary.

    We heartily congratulate the New York World for their editorial. In the 3vernacular of the day: The World said a mouthful. Let the Horthy regime and their faithful ally, Stanwood Menken, put this in their pipe and smoke it.

    [Translator's note.--This editorial written with reference to an editorial which appeared in the New York World on October 28, 1924.] It is gratifying to find among our contemporaries writers of ...

    Hungarian
    I C, I K, III B 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- November 21, 1924
    Countess Karolyi to Be in Chicago

    On November 29, Countess Karolyi will arrive at the La Salle Street depot. Upon her arrival, she will be the guest of the Council on Foreign Relations at a luncheon to be given in her honor at the La Salle Hotel. At this time, she will give a lecture in English, explaining why she is an exile from Hungary.

    During her visit, Countess Karolyi will not give any lectures in Hungarian due to the fact that she is scheduled to appear in Columbus immediately after her lectures in English in Chicago. After making her complete tour of English lectures, which will be completed in January, she will start on her tour of lectures in Hungarian.

    Therefore, November 29 will be the day on which the Chicago Hungarians can show their loyalty and their sincere appreciation for her visit here. We feel sure that the welcoming committee will make arrangements for the 2advancing liberal Hungarians to express their heartfelt welcome to this noble lady.

    At this time, we cannot give details of the plans of the committee, but we understand that elaborate preparations are being made by the prominent Hungarians of Chicago. We will have more information in regard to the reception in the very near future. We think that it would be very pleasing to her if a large number of Hungarians were at the La Salle Street station to welcome her.

    The Americans on the committee are only too glad to have suggestions from all Hungarians who are interested in this affair, and they cordially invite all to be present at this lecture. There will not be an admission charge, the only charge being made is for the luncheon, which follows the lecture.

    3

    The Chicago Hungarians must wake up from their dreams which has led their interest away from their relations with the homeland, and when Countess Karolyi arrives, we should have that day declared a holiday.

    Countess Karolyi deserves such respect a hundred fold, and at the same time the Chicago Hungarians must show to the American public and the American press their strength, intelligence, and appreciation, towards a woman so noble and so interested in Hungarian affairs. We urge every Hungarian to be present next Saturday.

    On November 29, Countess Karolyi will arrive at the La Salle Street depot. Upon her arrival, she will be the guest of the Council on Foreign Relations at a luncheon ...

    Hungarian
    II B 2 g, I C, I K
  • Magyar Tribune -- December 05, 1924
    Countess Karolyi in Chicago (Editorial)

    We were cheated in our expectations when we waited for Countess Karolyi to arrive in Chicago on Saturday morning because she had arrived the previous evening. This misunderstanding was caused by her manager, who had notified the committee two weeks previously that she would arrive in Chicago on Saturday. This committee in turn notified us to this effect.

    Among the people who were also disappointed, there was one group of Hungarian women, consisting of members and officers of the Chicago Hungarian Independent and Benevolent Ladies Society. Had we not known that they were Hungarian women, we would have believed they were members of the American committee, so elegant and impressive was their appearance.

    2

    After a rather lengthy discussion, it was decided that a committee of four present a bouquet of flowers to Countess Karolyi at the lecture she was to hold Saturday noon at the La Salle Hotel.

    Mrs. Frank Glancz president of the Ladies Society, Mrs. Henry Vogel, Mrs. Leo Laszlo, and Mrs. Klein arrived at the Hotel La Salle at one P. M., and presented Countess Karolyi with a bouquet, consisting of roses and chrysanthemums. The presentation was made in the presence of some of the leading citizens of Chicago.

    In making the presentation, Mrs. Glancz made a very impressive and heartfelt speech. Countess Karolyi thanked each one individually, expressing her appreciation and hope of being with these noble ladies in the near future.

    Mr. Ignac Izsak welcomed the Countess, and congratulated her upon the grand 3work done in the interest of the people of Hungary. These interesting speeches were heard at a luncheon which was sponsored by the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations. There were five hundred people present, among whom were some of the most prominent people of Chicago. There were approximately twenty-five of the more prominent Hungarians present also.

    Immediately after the luncheon, Mr. Victor Elting, one of Chicago's prominent citizens, and also chairman of the reception committee, in eloquent remarks, introduced Countess Karolyi.

    Countess Karolyi appeared on the stage dressed in black, and was a beautiful picture to behold. At first, she spoke the English language fluently, but later, while referring to notes, she spoke with a very pleasing Hungarian accent.

    She spoke for one hour, and the people listened very attentively, being 4interrupted only on occasions of applause. It was not only heard by those present, but also by the outside world by means of a national radio hookup.

    Countess Karolyi's speech had two principal parts: One was the explanation of the Hungarian aristocracy, the other part was devoted to the political situations in Hungary as it has been since the World War, and the part Mihaly Karolyi played in this political setup.

    We, who are acquainted with the Hungarian upper class, were surprised at the frankness and accuracy with which she dealt with the Hungarian barons, counts, and dukes, who are to blame for the unfortunate situation of Hungary. She painted a word picture of the most intimate life of these noble gentlemen, and with a few humorous sayings, she immediately connected her story with the political life of Hungary.

    She then spoke of the arrogant, bloated society which looks down on the 5common people with contempt, and represents the governing body of Hungary. With historical accuracy, she related the political history of Hungary from Kossuth to the present Horthy regime.

    The part played by Mihaly Karolyi in the last ten years was emphasized as she saw it when she was Countess Katinka Andrassy, and her viewpoint after she became the wife of Mihaly Karolyi.

    The political part of her speech was so correctly built up, and was given so accurately that the part of the audience who knew the political history of Hungary from close range, was completely surprised. She not only tried to be sincerely loyal, but she was also brave in presenting her facts.

    Without any fear, she pointed out the betrayals and sorrowful incidents which were caused by the League of Nations, America, and the Entente, in the unfair division of Hungary, and while this was being done, the Karolyi 6government's stronghold was being torn apart. They wanted to force Karolyi to agree to the crippling of Hungary. She discussed these facts so bravely that even those who are not her followers are fully satisfied that she does not represent the upper class, nor the Horthy government, but that she is here for the sole purpose of bettering the condition of the Hungarians and the entire Hungarian nation. It is for their interest and future that she is making these sacrifices. At this point, Countess Karolyi answered a few questions, and this notable lecture and luncheon came to an end.

    Countess Karolyi personally introduced herself to the Hungarian people who were present, and expressed her wish to come back to Chicago shortly to see the large number of working Hungarians who reside in Chicago.

    The Chicago Hungarians not only owe Countess Karolyi a vote of thanks and gratitude for delivering such an educational lecture to the prominent people of Chicago, but we must also thank the Chicago Council of Foreign 7Relations Committee for giving Countess Karolyi the opportunity to present her viewpoints, and relate the manner in which the people of Hungary have awakened. Now we can see our position and understand our own history and future development.

    Countess Karolyi held a lecture daily at different places, presenting her problem before distinguished personalities. She was honored at teas and banquets at many exclusive and prominent places. Her five day stay in Chicago was a real success in connection with her appearances and lectures, which prove the high esteem in which Countess Karolyi is held, and on the other hand, it was an honor to the people of Hungary to have their problems of democracy and the future of the Hungarian people presented by such an apostolic figure as the Countess, who preaches and lives for the interest of her people.

    We were cheated in our expectations when we waited for Countess Karolyi to arrive in Chicago on Saturday morning because she had arrived the previous evening. This misunderstanding was caused ...

    Hungarian
    II B 2 g, I K, I F 6, III B 2
  • Magyar Tribune -- May 15, 1925
    Parental Thoughts by Dr. Laszlo Nogrady (Editorial)

    The rearing of children should consist of filling their lives with worth-while projects. Society is determined by the behavior of its citizens. The social life of today is sick, and this means that there is something wrong with the way we bring up our children. Since this type of education comes from within the family circle, we feel that the trouble lies there--thus we shall examine the relationships of family life.

    Present conditions have broken down family life to a certain extent. This has naturally hurt the social education of the children, and yet [the demands of]society are an essential [factor]in the lives of the parents. Without proper social education the rearing of a child is impossible. Parents must stop this neglect of social education if they want their children 2to be well-educated and refined. Good behavior is taught in very few families because the parents refuse the responsibility, and are interested only in their own enjoyment. They neglect the proper education of their family. In many cases the parents are incapable of educating their families, and in some cases the parents themselves need education.

    Parents must prepare themselves for their parental duties. In certain parts of the world the lives of children are so regulated that by the time they become parents they are well prepared for this task. Today we are confronted with serious problems. Instead of our children being interested in family life and preparing themselves for future marriage, entertainment, dancing, and other worldly interests take up most of their time. The activities of our children and the parents of today are certainly no credit to us. They live for worldly enjoyment and have no respect for the needs of family life. The fact that family life is degenerating should not be astonishing.

    The initial impetus for the decline of the family was the emancipation of women. Many women took advantage of their new liberty and thereby lost 3their womanly charms. Although every woman can't be a mother, every mother is a woman. So naturally the pitfalls of"liberty" also befell the mothers.

    The emancipated women became emancipated mothers who misunderstood the responsibilities of parenthood. They were led to believe that it was sufficient that they were mothers. The emancipated mother refers to marriage as a sport; she is independent of her family and her duties to her family. She becomes a slave to style and society. She loves cafes, coffee-houses, and dance halls. These are the things these mothers enjoy, not their homes and families.

    The emancipated woman does not care to have children; her home is no more than a place of entertainment. The emancipated woman when she becomes a mother will not discard her worldly pleasures in order to take care of her child; she hires a nursemaid or a housekeeper to raise her child. If it is a crime to neglect parental care when the child is a baby, it is a much 4greater crime to neglect an older child when the parents should be setting an example for the child to follow. The only parents who can raise children are those who know the realities of life from which is derived the strength necessary to raise a child properly. Among the many problems of life the problem of parenthood seems to be a natural one. The reason people see this picture in an upside-down manner is because parenthood and the sacred institution of marriage have been misrepresented.

    The parents who baby their children are at fault also, because the children become spoiled and selfish.

    There are pessimistic and optimistic parents. The optimistic parent is one who is completely satisfied with the child and is continually praising him. The pessimistic parent is one who is continually reforming the child and is very strict in his teachings; withou concern for the [natural]tendencies of the child he constantly "drives" him. By this method the child becomes dependent, or alienated from the parents.

    5

    Many parents deal very severely with their children, scolding, beating, and ridiculing them for the least little thing. The child becomes mean and crude and resembles the parents. This is harmful to the parent also.

    There are parents who continually threaten, but never act--then there are those who are unsympathetic. All these parents are injurious to the welfare of family life. A child's education is made hazardous by the leniency of one parent as opposed to the strictness of the other.

    A great mistake is made by those parents who allow their children to taste of worldly pleasures before they are of age. The young people who are allowed this liberty, lose their self respect; they also lose what respect they had for their parents since their attitude toward life is changed.

    How can children respect the mothers who run around with their hair cut short, and wearing their dresses still shorter, imitating young ladies and trying to prove that they can still attract attention.

    6

    Even those parents who rear their children properly at home are threatened by many harmful outside influences. One of the most dangerous of these is the company the child keeps. It will happen more than once that the child is judged by his associates. It is easy to understand the potential danger of bad company.

    Secular education has great effect on a child also for he learns that his parents aren't the smartest people in the world. Such knowledge does not lessen the respect he holds for his parents but increases his understanding.

    As the child reaches puberty with its accompanying psychological havoc, the parent is forgotten temporarily, but if sex education were properly taught the child, his respect for his parents would begin anew. At this time great care should be taken by the parents because whatever noble work may have been done can be ruined very easily with improper handling of the child.

    It is not enough that one is the parent of the child--one must assume the 7responsibilities of parenthood. Worldly riches should be set aside-children should be raised and trained for the future. Our children's virtues mean more than all the wealth of the world. These facts should be given careful thought by parents so that their lives may be regulated for the benefit of their children.

    The rearing of children should consist of filling their lives with worth-while projects. Society is determined by the behavior of its citizens. The social life of today is sick, and ...

    Hungarian
    I B 3 b, I K, I A 1 a, I B 3 a
  • Magyar Tribune -- June 18, 1926
    Death Rate Among Babies (Editorial)

    More than a quarter of a million babies die yearly in the United States, or in other words, more than a million babies are lost every four years. This figure is amazing, and it means that we, as a civilized nation, must do something about this situation. According to baby specialists in the medical field, the death rate among babies can be lowered. This terrible death rate among babies must awaken society to realize that it must be stopped. We all know or should know that in order that a child may be healthy, the mother must receive proper care before and after the child is born, and the child in turn must receive proper medical care when it is born and proper parental care after it is born. The above-mentioned things are the only means by which we, as a human and civilized race, can save yearly a quarter of a million babies.

    We must realize that the mortality rate among mothers, in seventeen nations, is 2much lower than it is here in the United States; we also know that the death rate among babies is lower in nine nations than it is here. The aid of every person is needed to help lower this death rate. We Hungarians are especially concerned because the birth rate per family amongst us seems to be a little higher than the average.

    We must protect the children and the mothers in order that the future generation may be clean, strong and healthy, thereby ensuring a strong, able-bodied nation.

    More than a quarter of a million babies die yearly in the United States, or in other words, more than a million babies are lost every four years. This figure ...

    Hungarian
    I M, I K, I C
  • Magyar Tribune -- August 13, 1926
    The Position of Women in the World (Editorial)

    Everyone knows that a great change has taken place in the economic and social activities of Europe and the United States during the past hundred years. The working conditions of women were naturally affected by these changes. Their educational and political status also underwent great changes during this period. Up to the end of the nineteenth century, women's duties were confined to the home; they did their work the same way that they had been doing it for many hundreds of years previously. The upkeep of the home was left to the various members of the family. The care of the home, and the care of the children were the primary duties of the housewife. These duties took up most of her time. Business played a very unimportant part in man's life during this period. The necessities of life were provided for by man's own labor and by nature. Educational opportunities in those days as compared 2with today were almost negligible. The girls learned their domestic knowledge at home. In those days regardless of to what social class a girl belonged, it was impossible for her to go to a university in order to prepare herself for a professional position. In most countries the women could not assume a position lawfully in government circles.

    The citizenship status of women was not considered any more than was that of a child. A woman could not make a contract. She could not sue anyone nor could she be sued by anyone. If she committed a crime, the husband or the father was held responsible. A wife could not own property. She had very few rights over her children. If a woman worked for a salary, the salary automatically became the property of her husband.

    With the opening of the present century however, a great change took place. Large factories sprang up in every field of manufacture, and machines were 3invented to make working conditions easier; girls and women were hired to run these machines. Cities and small towns became industrial centers where men, women and even children made their way to work to make their own living. As industry developed, the people became specialized in certain fields of work. As this change came about, some of the women realized that they were as capable in the business world as were the men. They opened places of business and hired women for sales jobs. As women went into business, the realization developed slowly that they were highly suitable for office positions. As time went on, the younger girls were attracted to the business and factory world where they would work from the time they left school until they got married.

    With the opening of the era of women in industry, different countries realized that laws had to be enacted which would protect women against long hours and other hazardous conditions. As women became more and more involved in industry and business, laws were enacted which enabled them to acquire education on the same basis as men. However, in European countries cultural education among women is stressed more than anything else.

    4

    There isn't a country in the world which affords the educational opportunities to men and women that the United States does. It has been these educational opportunities which have made it possible for women to become doctors and other specialized workers.

    The status of women has changed legally and politically. In different countries different changes have taken place, but what we think is the most important is that women got the right to vote. Norway was the first country to grant suffrage to women. With this change came the right of women to represent the people in parliament, congress or other governmental activities.

    There are still countries where women have not gained the right to vote. But in these countries, the women are up in arms and are demanding their rights, which is no more than just. Women are as capable as men in most instances, and therefore they should have the same rights.

    5

    The purpose of this article is that we want our people to become acquainted with the social activities of the women of America. We want our Chicago Hungarian readers to know how the women advanced step by step. We want our women to realize the educational opportunities they have. We want them to know what opportunities await them in the business world or in the field of politics.

    We think that as long as these opportunities exist, women should take advantage of them.

    Everyone knows that a great change has taken place in the economic and social activities of Europe and the United States during the past hundred years. The working conditions of ...

    Hungarian
    I K, I C