The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- March 21, 1879
    The Hungarian Relief

    Mayor Heath has issued an address to the people of Chicago, reminding them of the fact that in October, 1871, the contribution of HUNGARY,to the relief of the homeless and hungry sufferers of this city,amounted to $12,000. A good portion of this was doubtless furnished by the inhabitants of SZEGEDIN, the second commercial city of the KINGDOM. The terrible distress into which these people have been plunged in consequence of the recent floods calls for a reciprocation by Chicago of their abundant charity, it is therefore proper that the attention of our people should be directed to the matter in an offical manner. The DEAK VEREIN, a HUNGARIAN society in this city, has assumed the task of receiving and forwarding such contributions as may be offered Chicago should give a good account of itself in this HUNGARIAN relief movement. There is little danger that more will be given than is needed to provide for the 80,000 people reduced to destitution by the flood.

    Mayor Heath has issued an address to the people of Chicago, reminding them of the fact that in October, 1871, the contribution of HUNGARY,to the relief of the homeless and ...

    Hungarian
    III H, II D 10
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 14, 1879
    Szegedin Relief Fund

    The Deak Society into whose hands was placed the collections for the suffering people of Szegedin, Hungary, met yesterday afternoon at the Relief Society Building, No. 51 and 53 La Salle Street.

    The President, Mr. F. Kiss, presided, and in opening the meeting stated that out of the funds collected for the Szegedin sufferers, $3,360 had been invested in a draft for 8,000 florins payable to Mr. Kalman Tissa, the President of the Hungarian Ministry, and that the draft was sent to its destination. There still remained in the hands of the Society $46 applicable to the charity.

    Since it was understood that no further collections would be made, several of the 2gentlemen who had lent their time and energies to the worthy cause presented their books and accounts, showing the names of contributors and the amounts given, and asked that they be examined and reported upon by a committee appointed for the purpose.

    Mr. J. Kune offered a resolution thanking the President and the Directors of the Board of Trade for courtesies extended and facilities granted for carrying on the work.

    The resolution was adopted.

    The Deak Society into whose hands was placed the collections for the suffering people of Szegedin, Hungary, met yesterday afternoon at the Relief Society Building, No. 51 and 53 La ...

    Hungarian
    III H, II D 10
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 23, 1917
    The Emigration Problem

    Previous to the war which has been going on for the past three years, many of us who never thought that we would go back to Hungary,are now thinking seriously of emigrating with the thought that after the war there will be a shortage of man power due to the great number that lost their lives or became cripples.

    There is some question as to whether the supposition is true. Does it seem probable that the Hungarians emigrating from this country, will be respected as good workers, and can they expect a livable wage for their work? Why did we come to this country? Was it not because there were too many of us in Hungary and we could not make a living there?

    As we learned in school, the natural resources of Hungary are silver, iron ore, and coal and easy transportation by water. Our immigration to this country was therefore not caused by Hungary's not having sufficient natural resources. The 2real reason seems to be political and lack of general wealth among the people, also lack of general and technical education. On account of these facts many of the people became surplus population in their particular line of work,and if a man did get a job he was 'pushed around' and constantly reminded, that if he did not like his job there were many others who would like it. Most particularly was this true of the agricultural worker. Most of them worked long hours for very low wages. Hungary is an agricultural country and most of its farm implements are manufactured in foreign countries; therefore industry absorbs very few or none of the employables.

    About the only place where industry and mining thrive and develop is in the agricultural regions where the owners can obtain cheap and ignorant help. This situation brings about a wandering class of workers. This type of workers has a tendency to retard the development of both agriculture and industry. We would think that the working class of people are at fault, but there is also a certain percentage of professional men involved; they cannot find work due to the fact that in Hungary the industries are so far behind in development. Such was the picture before the war started.

    3

    Even then the workers were beginning to realize that organization was necessary. They wanted shorter hours and more pay. But the Capitalists realized the ignorance of the people and created internal strife among them, so that these organizations were soon broken up.

    But now the war is nearing its end, and the people are fast realizing that they were not fighting and killing to save their own, but to save the property of those who had treated them so harshly. In Hungary the great land owners are the law makers and legislators. The people who fought for them must realize these facts, and they must demand their rights.

    The development of Hungary depends on the question of whether or not the people who fought in the war will have any rights. If the government provides regulations for livable wages for the agricultural workers, free press, and free and independent courts for the people, then perhaps the Hungarians in America might feel that it would be worth their while to go back to Hungary after the war is over.

    Previous to the war which has been going on for the past three years, many of us who never thought that we would go back to Hungary,are now thinking seriously ...

    Hungarian
    III G, I G, III H
  • Magyar Tribune -- September 14, 1917
    Hungarian Mail Problem Settled.

    The United States government has made it possible for Hungarian immigrants to correspond with their relatives and families.

    The foreign minister asked for a volunteer agency to handle this work. The Red Cross volunteered to handle it. The following are instructions in regard to this service.

    (1) People desiring information as to the whereabouts of relatives should write to the Bureau of Communication,giving all information available concerning the person about whom inquiry is being made. Enclose a self addressed envelope,and a two cent stamp.

    (2) All communications should be as short as possible.

    (3) The letters must contain only personal correspondence.

    2

    (4) The letters must be readable and may be written in the following languages: English, French, Italian, Russian, German, Jewish, Hungarian, Turkish or Greek.

    (5) The writer must sign his full name, address,and occupation.

    (6) An individual may only write one letter every six weeks.

    The Bureau of Communication maintains the right to withhold any and all letters that contain information regarding the United States government or its army or navy.

    The United States government has made it possible for Hungarian immigrants to correspond with their relatives and families. The foreign minister asked for a volunteer agency to handle this work. ...

    Hungarian
    III H
  • Magyar Tribune -- September 28, 1917
    Some Day Hungarians Will Be Able to Communicate with Homeland.

    The Hungarian newspaper, The Magyar Nepszava ,in its last few issues has been taking all the credit for obtaining the Red Cross as an agency to handle mail for Hungarians between their homeland and the United States. But the fact is that not a single Hungarian letter that has been sent to the Red Cross, has been forwarded to Hungary. Now the Red Cross has announced that communication by letter between Hungary and the United States has been temporarily stopped.

    Probably some day the postal communication will be open between the United States and Hungary, but not just yet.

    The Hungarian newspaper, The Magyar Nepszava ,in its last few issues has been taking all the credit for obtaining the Red Cross as an agency to handle mail for Hungarians ...

    Hungarian
    III H
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 04, 1918
    Why the Hungarian Worker Is Well Liked by America.

    There has never been a better opportunity to prove that the American people recognize the Hungarian workers. This is probably due to the conditions which exist between this country and Hungary. A question has been asked in the United States, what shall we do with the Hungarians? Shall they be dealt with the same as the Germans, or shall they be deported, as they are from most countries, who are citizens of a foreign country? This powerfully organized country has recognized the love, loyalty and liberal mindedness of the Hungarians who have become voluntary citizens of this country.

    The United States government has recognized these facts. President Wilson, instead of recognizing the Hungarians as hostile foreigners, as usual, in time of war, has put his arms around them and assured them that within the United States they may walk as free men. They shall have the same opportunities for employment that they have had. They shall have the same rights 2within the law that they have had.

    The Hungarian people have never denied their love for Hungary. This country never asked them to deny their love for the country of their birth. All the United States government wanted of them was that they be law abiding and faithful workers towards the fulfilment of tasks of this country. The Hungarian Americans have lived up to these expectations. These facts, of course, have put the Hungarian workers in favorable light in industry.

    Although the fact remains that the Hungarian worker did not establish himself during the war but away before the war they were recognized as favorable people to build the nation both morally and physically.

    The question will be asked, how did he establish himself? The answer is simple, the Hungarian is a good worker, and a good man as a citizen.

    It is natural that the Hungarian worker commands a lot of respect in industrial 3centers due to the fact that he can do hard physical work as well as good mental work. The Hungarian worker has a few very definite characteristics, he is exacting, sober minded, faithful and loyal in his work.

    The worker is not only liked by the employer, but is also liked by the city government and the community in which he lives. In order to analyze a man's character the American asks, does he belong to a church? Is he a God fearing man, and is he religions? And the Hungarian has everything in his favor with regards to the religious questions.

    The Hungarian mechanics are recognized as some of the best, and the American employer never hesitates to hire a Hungarian professional man.

    Industry likes the Hungarians, but does the Hungarian make a good soldier and does he like industry? The answer to this is unquestionably, yes.

    4

    It is only natural that Hungarians are entirely welcome to become citizens of the United States. They have been found to be good citizens both in this country and in their own.

    Therefore, taking everything into consideration, the Hungarian man becomes a contributing factor in the building of this country, and industry appreciates them and recognizes them for all they are worth.

    There has never been a better opportunity to prove that the American people recognize the Hungarian workers. This is probably due to the conditions which exist between this country and ...

    Hungarian
    III A, I C, I G, III H
  • Magyar Tribune -- August 02, 1918
    Chicago-Hungarians Open European Communication

    The Chicago-Hungarians feel very much relieved now that they can communicate with Hungary by mail.

    The Hungarian Patriotic Association of Chicago has made arrangements with the American Red Cross, who will act as a forwarding agency for all mail coming to and going from Hungarians in the United States. The Hungarian Patriotic Association has also made arrangements with the Immigrant Protective League, at 324 South Halsted Street to have a Hungarian in their offices twice a week to receive the letters personally from all those who belong to the Hungarian Patriotic Association and can identify themselves as such. The Immigrants Protective League will then forward these letters to the Red Cross.

    The Chicago-Hungarians feel very much relieved now that they can communicate with Hungary by mail. The Hungarian Patriotic Association of Chicago has made arrangements with the American Red Cross, who ...

    Hungarian
    III B 2, III H
  • Magyar Tribune -- November 22, 1918
    Louis Kossuth Leader of Hungarian Independence (Editorial)

    Louis Kossuth, leader of the Hungarian revolution against Austria in 1848, who exiled himself after the uprising was suppressed, forwarded a message to the people of the United States before he visited this country. In this message were utterances of great importance, and predictions which, for the most part came true. For this reason, and for the unshakable confidence the former governor of Hungary had expressed in the sense of justice of this nation and for its bitter attack on Austria, vassal of Germany.

    2

    While writing in this country, the great leader for liberty first described events as they happened, and asserted that Austria had fought against the Hungarians not only with arms, and with the aid of traitors, but with diabolical plans and unceasing slander.

    Louis Kossuth addressed the American people in this manner: "Free citizens of America! You have given in spite of this slander your fullest sympathy to my country. Oh that you had been the neighboring nation, the Old World would now be free, and you would not be forced to endure those terrible "convulsions" again, and cross rivers of "blood" which are inevitable. But the end is with God, and he will choose the means to fulfill his purpose."

    These words, prophetic as they were, have come true, even in their negative 3sense, that if America had been the neighboring nation, the old world would have been free, and we had not witnessed the present catastrophe.

    In another passage, the passing of the Hapsburgh is foretold, the message reads: "Francis Joseph, thou beardless Nero, thou darest say that Hungary shall not exist, but you and your treacherous house shall stand no longer, you shall no longer be king of Hungary. Be forever banished, you terrible traitor to the nation!"

    The disruption of a centralized Austrian empire is predicted as follows: "The sentiment of sympathy for our sufferings will inspire among the smaller states and race the wish for a fraternal confederation for that 4which I always urged as the only safe policy and guarantee of freedom for all of them.

    The realization of this idea will hurl the power of the haughty monarch's history out of the past, and Hungary will be free and surrounded by four nations.

    Among the nations of the world, we owe gratitude and affection to the people of the United States, who, with their liberal government, inspired us with hope, and gave us courage by their deep interest in our cause and sufferings." Kossuth exclaims in his appeal: "Austria, even in her victory, has given herself a mortal wound. Her weakness is betrayed. The 5world does no longer believe that it needs the preservation of this decoyed empire. It is evident that its existence is a curse to the welfare of society. Among all the races of the empire, there is none that does not despair the reigning family of Hapsburgh. When the empire falls, not a tear of regret will follow it to its grave, and it will surely fall. A shot fired from an American or English vessel from the Adriatic would be like a trumpet at the city of "Jericho."

    Describing the sentiment in this country some fifty years ago, Kossuth writes the following: "The President of the United States in whom the confidence of a few people have elevated to the loftiest station in the world, in his message to Congress announced that the American government would have been the first to recognize the independence of Hungary. And 6the Senators and Representatives in Congress marked the destroyers of the liberty of my country with stigma of ignominy and expressed with indignant feelings their contempt for the conduct of Austria, and their wish to break diplomatic intercourse with that government. The summoned monarchs are before the "judgment seat of humanity."

    Louis Kossuth, leader of the Hungarian revolution against Austria in 1848, who exiled himself after the uprising was suppressed, forwarded a message to the people of the United States before ...

    Hungarian
    I G, III H
  • Magyar Tribune -- November 22, 1918
    Hungarian Liberty Holiday

    On November 24 at 2 P.M. the Chicago-Hungarians will celebrate Liberty Day. The Hungarians in Chicago can be proud of the fact that there are people who are interested in the welfare of relatives and friends who were left behind, and feel the importance of this change in government in Hungary.

    We are with them, we all will be present to help celebrate the Holiday of the Hungarians of the United States and Europe.

    On November 24 at 2 P.M. the Chicago-Hungarians will celebrate Liberty Day. The Hungarians in Chicago can be proud of the fact that there are people who are interested in ...

    Hungarian
    III B 3 a, III H
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 14, 1919
    The Chicago-Hungarian Reformed Sick Benefit Society's Invitation

    Hungarian Brothers:

    Since 1848, wherever there are Hungarian people, March 15 has been celebrated every year as a day when Hungary first took arms to win independence.

    There has never been a time more appropriate than the present to show our true feeling toward the nation from which we came. It is with great joy and appreciation that we thank God for the fulfillment of Louis Kossuth's dream through our many sacrifices to gain 2Hungary's independence.

    We take the opportunity at this time to ask the different Hungarian societies,as well as all Hungarians, to come and celebrate with us. We have done everything in our power to make this celebration outstanding, now that Hungary is independent, and March 15 is a real holiday.

    For this occasion, we have been fortunate to secure the best Hungarian, as well as American, speakers, who, with all their hearts and oratorical ability, will try to make this a memorable occasion.

    It will be more elaborate, more memorable when we unfurl the first flag 3that has been accepted by the Hungarian Peoples' government. This is the flag that has been officially accepted by the Hungarian government.

    This flag has been donated to this society by Mr. and Mrs. Demeter Davaban, who are loyal members of this society.

    We ask every Hungarian to be present when we show this flag of Independent Hungary for the first time in this country.

    The celebration will begin at 1 P.M. Sunday afternoon, March 16. A parade will start at 641 East 93 Street. At this point, the different Hungarian societies will meet with their American flags.

    4

    From here also they will march to the Hungarian Reformed Church of Burnside. The parade will be escorted by a Hungarian band. After due church ceremonies in church, the parade will continue to the Pythian Temple at 9235 Cottage Grove, where a very interesting extraordinary program has been arranged. After the program, there will be dancing for the younger people.

    If there are any friends who would like to have their names remembered in connection with the raising of this flag, we are going to sell gold nails on which their names may be inscribed. This is a fine way in which to show one's loyalty to this first flag of independent Hungary.

    With renewed effort, we ask all Hungarians to take part in this worthy 5celebration. With your cooperation, we can make this event an outstanding event in the history of the Chicago-Hungarians.

    I remain yours with brotherly love,

    Colman Balogh, president,

    724 East 92 Street,

    Chicago, Illinois

    Hungarian Brothers: Since 1848, wherever there are Hungarian people, March 15 has been celebrated every year as a day when Hungary first took arms to win independence. There has never ...

    Hungarian
    III B 3 a, IV, III C, III H, III B 2, II D 1