The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Magyar Tribune -- March 15, 1917
    Hungarians Victims of Hyenas

    The trusting and kind hearted Hungarians were very easy victims of the swindlers and had many hard earned dollars taken away from them.

    When immigration was at its height, the Hungarians thought that they were coming to this country as mere guests of America, therefore they did not think it necessary to learn to read and write the English language. There were, however, a few exceptions and out of these exception rose the swindling hyenas.

    The unfortunate immigrants could not look for work, they could not write English, they could not sell, they could not buy. In other words they could not do anything unless they consulted one of the people who could read and write both Hungarian and English.

    2

    The oldest and most profitable racket was the employment racket. When the poor foreigner came to this country he was very unfamiliar with working conditions. So these labor racketeers would sign them up as strike-breakers, or put them to work clearing forests or put them down in mines making them work under very unhealthy conditions, and the wages for the most of these jobs were nothing but slavery wages. But this kind of a racketeering is a thing of the past, mostly due to the fact that the Hungarian press and the government have gotten after them. But as this racket faded a new one took its place.

    The people gradually became acquainted with their surroundings and being of a thrifty class of people they began to save some money. So then racketeers invented new schemes to relieve the Hungarians of their wealth.

    With the development of fraternal organizations, such great depredations took place that these organizations remain as a sore spot in the hearts of the Hungarians. There was for example an organization that offered twenty-five dollars sick benefit and a 3policy worth five-hundred dollars in case of death. This was purely a fraudulent scheme. When the time came to collect, the policy proved to be nothing but a one dollar railroad ticket. We know of localities where as many as twenty-five families were involved, each family paying twenty-five dollars cash for this supposed protection.

    Now there are other rackets such as stocks and bonds, property that does not exist, and patent medicines. One of the greatest foes of these rackets, the one that has cut this racketeering down a great deal is the Hungarian Miners News.

    This racketeering not only hurt the wealth of the people but it also makes it hard for the legitimate business man to sell reputable product. Now the better class of business people are starting to recognize the value of the business that might be had from the Hungarians in Chicago and other Eastern cities. We think it necessary to mention the Union Pacific Railroad and Fred H. Bartlett Realty Company, who have 4lent a hand in doing away with the racketeering hyenas who preyed on the Hungarian people. These two organizations offered their services and are willing to give advice of any nature.

    We therefore urge the Hungarian people to learn from the experiences of others and do business with firms, organization doctors, that have a well established reputation. This article is meant to be an article to educate the Hungarian people to be on their guard against swindling hyenas.

    The trusting and kind hearted Hungarians were very easy victims of the swindlers and had many hard earned dollars taken away from them. When immigration was at its height, the ...

    Hungarian
    I H, II E 3, II E 2, II E 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- October 30, 1925
    About Gangsters (Editorial)

    You must go, you must leave!

    You must gather up your belongings and must leave Chicago and the vicinity.

    This was the order which was given by the chief of detectives to all gangsters and gunmen.

    When the chief of detectives issues such orders, they had better be obeyed or else there will be real trouble.

    But this was not the only order issued by the chief of detectives; he also said that the characters of the underworld must leave within three days, but this time limit expired last Thursday. He told the police not to play around much with these gangsters, but should let them taste the sting of bullets if they ran across any of them before the gangsters beat them 2to the act.

    In this last part of the order there is logic, because it is better for society to be rid of a bandit who is unnecessary, than [to be rid of]the police who are necessary to society.

    The first part of the order, that the gangsters shall leave the city within three days, does not seem to mean anything.

    It is unnecessary to state that every resident of the city of Chicago would be overwhelmingly happy if a pleasant day came along and all the gangsters would leave.

    But will this ever happen?

    We wonder whether those warriors of the underworld will pay any attention to the orders of the chief of detectives?

    Perhaps there are a few people who believe that this order issued by the 3chief will rid the city of all the gunmen and gangsters.

    As far as the gunmen of the city are concerned, this order does not mean so much as a serious thought.

    We can't imagine the leaders of the underworld being scared by this order, after they have had the people of the city half scared out of their wits for such a long time.

    These gangsters are so used to such orders by now, that they don't pay any attention to them any more. These orders are just orders and they do not mean much to them. They do what they want regardless of orders, and they do not pay attention to the police.

    We are fully satisfied that there wasn't a single gangster or bandit who packed and left the city in accordance with the orders issued.

    As a matter of fact, the chief of detectives knows this also. He knows 4that none of the gangsters will leave the city.

    If he thought that the gangsters were going to leave the city, he would never have issued the order--shoot to kill--to the policemen.

    The city can't rid itself of gangsters through orders such as these.

    We must not forget that the present-day gangster is not of the same type as was the one of bygone days--the old-time gangster came from distant cities and worked at night.

    The present-day gangsters are well organized and they have many influential connections.

    The present-day bandit can't be compared with those of long ago whose only protection was the wilderness, and that wasn't very good protection.

    The present-day gangsters are organized on a business-[like]basis, and these 5well-organized gangsters can find protection under the fold of big politicians, and this is also on a business basis.

    That this is so, can be easily seen by looking at the cases of Druggan and Lake, the beer barons, who are outstanding examples of well-organized criminals.

    If we want to rid the city of criminals, the first thing we must do is to clean up our politics. The criminal will only work hard when he knows that he is fully protected, regardless of what his crime may be.

    If the protection of the criminal is stopped, then crime will cease to exist.

    When the criminal finds that he can't escape the hand of the law, then he will give up his criminal practices voluntarily.

    If the criminal does not [receive]protection, then he will find out that crime does not pay. His criminal attempts may be successful once or twice, 6but sooner or later he will be caught, and the penalty he will pay will be greater than his profits.

    This is what will stop crime in Chicago, and not ordinary orders as issued by the chief of detectives.

    Stop crime in politics--that is what we want.

    You must go, you must leave! You must gather up your belongings and must leave Chicago and the vicinity. This was the order which was given by the chief of ...

    Hungarian
    II E 1, I F 6, II E 3
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 27, 1928
    Approved Lawbreaking by Dezso Tomor

    We should be celebrating the tenth anniversary of the Volstead Act, which was to improve mankind and to save them from sin. The law prohibits the manufacture, sale, transportation, ownership and use [sic] of intoxicating liquors. That this law did not become popular is only natural, because it prohibits but does not protect. By this time everyone has realized that the opposite result was achieved from that originally intended.....

    A conference was arranged between a prohibition administrator and bootleggers in another state. The purpose of this conference was to determine the amount of income tax that bootleggers should pay.

    The sale of liquor is prohibited. Anyone found guilty of breaking the prohibition law is punished. Therefore, the penalty has been paid, probably the bootlegger was even jailed. Why should he pay an income tax also?

    2

    The administrator's idea is novel. By the same right bank robbers and hired assassins should pay income tax also.....

    If a law is enacted it should be enforced. If the law is not satisfactory and cannot be enforced, it should be repealed instead of compromising with the lawbreakers. This way it seems as if lawbreaking is approved.

    We should be celebrating the tenth anniversary of the Volstead Act, which was to improve mankind and to save them from sin. The law prohibits the manufacture, sale, transportation, ownership ...

    Hungarian
    I B 2, II E 3, II E 1