The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- March 21, 1879
    The Hungarian Relief

    Mayor Heath has issued an address to the people of Chicago, reminding them of the fact that in October, 1871, the contribution of HUNGARY,to the relief of the homeless and hungry sufferers of this city,amounted to $12,000. A good portion of this was doubtless furnished by the inhabitants of SZEGEDIN, the second commercial city of the KINGDOM. The terrible distress into which these people have been plunged in consequence of the recent floods calls for a reciprocation by Chicago of their abundant charity, it is therefore proper that the attention of our people should be directed to the matter in an offical manner. The DEAK VEREIN, a HUNGARIAN society in this city, has assumed the task of receiving and forwarding such contributions as may be offered Chicago should give a good account of itself in this HUNGARIAN relief movement. There is little danger that more will be given than is needed to provide for the 80,000 people reduced to destitution by the flood.

    Mayor Heath has issued an address to the people of Chicago, reminding them of the fact that in October, 1871, the contribution of HUNGARY,to the relief of the homeless and ...

    Hungarian
    III H, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 24, 1879
    The Deak Club

    The Deak Club held its meeting, as announced, at the Sherman House, at three o'clock in the afternoon, with Mr. Kiss presiding.

    At the beginning of the session a brief account of the Club's activity with respect to aid for the flood sufferers in Szegedin, Hungary, was given; also the proposed concert, on April 5, at Farwell Hall, was considered. According to the Club's plan, five thousand tickets are to be printed; general admission will be fifty cents, reserved seats a dollar each. The rent for the hall amounts to thirty-five dollars. The suggestion resulted in an extensive debate which ended in a resolution to await the reply of Mr. Remenyi [violinist], before deciding on the concert.

    The reports of the various collection committees show that $1333 has been received.

    2

    Mr. Logan was requested to approach the wholesale dealers and seek contributions. Messrs. Kornhausen and Peabody offered to see the liquor dealers. Every committee was then given authority to add members to its staff.

    As heretofore, the newspapers are to be notified every evening about the day's collections. Mr. Pick made a motion to ask a newspaper and a bank to issue an appeal for aid, and to accept contributions. He suggested the Illinois Staats-Zeitung and Tribune. Mr. Peabody wanted the First National Bank to be chosen for the purpose. The chairman was opposed. The motion was made, [it was explained] because many people are willing to help, but do not know whom to see about it.

    Mr. Peabody then made a motion that the collected money should be sent to the mayor of Budapest. The president then declared that, should such a procedure be adopted recognition for all this work would be given to Chicago, and not to the Club, precisely as happened several years ago, when money was 3sent to Pest. The meeting was then adjourned until next Sunday.

    The Deak Club held its meeting, as announced, at the Sherman House, at three o'clock in the afternoon, with Mr. Kiss presiding. At the beginning of the session a brief ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, III B 2
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 14, 1879
    Szegedin Relief Fund

    The Deak Society into whose hands was placed the collections for the suffering people of Szegedin, Hungary, met yesterday afternoon at the Relief Society Building, No. 51 and 53 La Salle Street.

    The President, Mr. F. Kiss, presided, and in opening the meeting stated that out of the funds collected for the Szegedin sufferers, $3,360 had been invested in a draft for 8,000 florins payable to Mr. Kalman Tissa, the President of the Hungarian Ministry, and that the draft was sent to its destination. There still remained in the hands of the Society $46 applicable to the charity.

    Since it was understood that no further collections would be made, several of the 2gentlemen who had lent their time and energies to the worthy cause presented their books and accounts, showing the names of contributors and the amounts given, and asked that they be examined and reported upon by a committee appointed for the purpose.

    Mr. J. Kune offered a resolution thanking the President and the Directors of the Board of Trade for courtesies extended and facilities granted for carrying on the work.

    The resolution was adopted.

    The Deak Society into whose hands was placed the collections for the suffering people of Szegedin, Hungary, met yesterday afternoon at the Relief Society Building, No. 51 and 53 La ...

    Hungarian
    III H, II D 10
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 23, 1917
    Theatrical Play Given for the Aid of War Cripples

    On March 27, The South Side Good Will Society will present a very beautiful and interesting play at the Pythian Temple located at 9231 Cottage Grove Avenue. The profits from this performance will be used for the relief of those crippled in the war.

    On March 27, The South Side Good Will Society will present a very beautiful and interesting play at the Pythian Temple located at 9231 Cottage Grove Avenue. The profits from ...

    Hungarian
    II B 1 c 1, II D 10, I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 06, 1917
    Spring Dance

    The Chicago Independent Ladies Aid Lodge will sponsor a spring festival dance on April 14, 1917 at Schoenhofen's Hall.

    A cordial invitation is extended to all good Hungarians to attend this dance. The price of admission is only twenty-five cents.

    The entire profits from this dance will be used for charitable purposes.

    The Chicago Independent Ladies Aid Lodge will sponsor a spring festival dance on April 14, 1917 at Schoenhofen's Hall. A cordial invitation is extended to all good Hungarians to attend ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, III B 2
  • Magyar Tribune -- October 05, 1917
    Hungarian Activities in the United States (Editorial)

    The Hungarian American people of the United States have only one type of organization that has been of common interest to all of them and that is the lodge. The lodges are not all alike, but there is no essential difference in principles. They play a very important part in the life of the Hungarians and should be the focal point of all their various activities.

    Regardless of the difference in principles, it should be their duty to further the development of organizations so important to the social and moral life of the Hungarians. I know the activities that have taken place among our people in the United States, outside of those that have been sponsored by the lodges, there has never been anything of a permanent nature, undertaken and finished.

    2

    I don't want to blame any individual for their shortcomings; it would be very easy to name the persons who have done quite a bit to retard this great work. Placing the blame on individuals would not help the cause, but probably harm it, and what is more, if the Hungarian-Americans want to do something, create something, it should not be left solely to individuals.

    There must be enough power, leadership and cooperation among the Hungarian-Americans to develop permanent institutions, even though it be necessary to disregard individual ideas. Maybe the belief is extant that a good number of Hungarians will leave the country after the war and therefore would not be interested. But I do not think they will leave in such large numbers that permanent activities among our nationals will have to be discontinued. On the contrary such activities will probably become more important in the future since a great number of Hungarians undoubtedly will return to this country.

    3

    I don't want to write about what activities should be started by the Hungarian-Americans because I do not want to force anything on the people that they might not want, or sincerely believe in. The people themselves should feel what they want. The Hungarian-Americans should not do what I or some one else thinks is a good idea, but they should decide what is most necessary and desirable for our group.

    I can not tell what the Hungarian-American feels is the most important activity in his life; But I do know that every other nationality has done something in their own interest. Their interests vary. Some are interested in hospitals, orphanages, aid societies, and sport activities; the Hungarian-American can not boast of any of these things.

    I don't believe that any nationality should be any more interested in such institutions than the Hungarians. A body of men such as the lodges should take the initiative, otherwise I can't see how the Hungarian-Americans can accomplish anything worth while in this field.

    4

    I have presented this idea, hoping that the lodges and its members will go into action so that we Hungarians can keep up with the other nationalities. I do not claim to be the first one to suggest that we Hungarians do something for ourselves. Up to date our work has been planless and scattered, not touching the soul of the Hungarian-American. A radical change will have to take place, and it is up to ourselves to create the social activities and in situations which will aid us in achieving a brighter future.

    The Hungarian American people of the United States have only one type of organization that has been of common interest to all of them and that is the lodge. The ...

    Hungarian
    III B 2, II D 10, II D 3, II D 1, II D 4, II B 3, I C
  • Magyar Tribune -- July 19, 1918
    Chicago-Hungarian Athletic Club

    Despite the fact that the soccer season has ended, the Chicago-Hungarian Athletic Club showed its colors as being the right kind of organization when it decided to stage a game, from which the gate receipts would be turned over to charity.

    The Chicago-Hungarian Athletic Club played a team made up of all members of the Bohemian soccer teams in Chicago and vicinity.

    The Hungarian team defeated the Bohemian all-stars by a score of 4 to 0. This proved that even after a long season of inactivity they are still able to defend their good name.

    Despite the fact that the soccer season has ended, the Chicago-Hungarian Athletic Club showed its colors as being the right kind of organization when it decided to stage a game, ...

    Hungarian
    II B 3, II D 10
  • Magyar Tribune -- September 20, 1918
    A New Society

    A new society is being introduced into the circle of Hungarian societies. It is a society with good principles and high ideals: "The Twentieth Century-Ladies Society." The officers of this new society are: Mrs. Paul Biss, president; Mrs. Lena Steiner is the secretary, and Mrs. Schlesenger is the treasurer, and Mrs. Szivmay is the organizer.

    The introduction of this new society will take place on September 28th, when this newly organized society will sponsor an evening of entertainment.

    This society is a benevolent society and a charitable organization.

    A new society is being introduced into the circle of Hungarian societies. It is a society with good principles and high ideals: "The Twentieth Century-Ladies Society." The officers of this ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, II D 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 19, 1919
    The Hungarian Heart

    A few weeks ago an article appeared in this newspaper in which aid was asked for a very poor Hungarian family. The plea was recognized as worthy of attention almost immediately by the Chicago Hungarian Ladies' Charitable Society, which without calling a meeting, donated three dollars in cash to this unfortunate family. Mrs. Frank Pollack a member of the society also took up a collection among her friends and received eight dollars and twenty five cents which she turned over to this family in need; to the cash donations were added many articles of clothing and an ample supply of food.

    This is a good example of how light-hearted the Hungarians are; this half starved family was rescued almost as soon as the condition was made known among its countrymen in Chicago.

    A few weeks ago an article appeared in this newspaper in which aid was asked for a very poor Hungarian family. The plea was recognized as worthy of attention almost ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10
  • Magyar Tribune -- September 12, 1919
    Good News for Chicago Hungarians.

    We wish to announce, through the columns of this newspaper, that it is possible to communicate with Hungary through the mails.

    What this means to the Hungarian people is needless to discuss. We have talked and thought enough about it already.

    This is a piece of news that has been awaited very patiently; the oceans have opened in front of us. Now we can open communications and we have won the first item of our fight. Now we can see that something is happening for the benefit of the Hungarian people, and our patient waiting will have come to an end. Now idle talk is not necessary and the guessing game that people have conducted can be stopped. It does not make much difference when people can be assured of going to Hungary in safety.

    The main thing is that the Hungarian people can receive and send mail to and from Hungary, and within a short time all Hungarians will know just exactly what is happening in their homeland.

    2

    This newspaper has always said that the mail channels have to be opened before any other type of transportation or communication can be hoped for by the Hungarian people.

    We have always maintained that until the mail is opened to all parts of Hungary, all other activities in relation to the homeland are futile.

    Now we can speak with more confidence of the future. How people may have popes that in a few months, those who want to return to Hungary may be able to do so. Those people who want to return to Hungary will know just as soon as they receive their first letter, whether it is worth taking a chance. The people who are planning to emigrate can start buying presents for their relatives, because we feel that in a few months all the channels of travel will be open.

    3

    Besides the sending and receiving of letters, it is permissible to send money and packages to Hungary. Whether it is advisable to send money to Hungary is open to question. Prices in Hungary are terribly high and out of all proportion, for instance, a pair of chickens in American money would cost the buyer $24; a goose, $36 and the price of clothing is beyond belief.

    The sending of money would not mean very much, but to send packages containing clothing would be of much greater help. The time has come when these questions must be given serious thought by the Hungarian people.

    The motto of all good Hungarians must be this; "We will send more letters and packages to our loved ones."

    The Chicago Hungarians can do much for the Hungarian nation. This downtrodden and broken-hearted, but still spirited people, need food and decent clothing. Now that winter is closing in fast, we would advise those who plan on sending clothing to their people in Hungary, to send winter clothing, at once.

    We wish to announce, through the columns of this newspaper, that it is possible to communicate with Hungary through the mails. What this means to the Hungarian people is needless ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, III H