The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Magyar Tribune -- March 15, 1917
    Hungarian Business Man's Success

    Mr. Alex Schwartz is an up and coming Hungarian business man who owns the successful business enterprise known as the Original Hungarian Restaurant. He is located on Dearborn Street in downtown Chicago, and his restaurant is the favorite eating place for many of the prominent people of Chicago; doctors, lawyers, actors and actresses. They have made the restaurant their favorite meeting place. This establishment is patronized by Hungarians from far and wide. The Chicago Restaurant is the second one of its kind in the United States. Mr. Schwartz also has one in New York City.

    Mr. Alex Schwartz is an up and coming Hungarian business man who owns the successful business enterprise known as the Original Hungarian Restaurant. He is located on Dearborn Street in ...

    Hungarian
    II A 2, IV
  • Otthon -- March 18, 1923
    Hungarian Foreign Exchange

    Odon Kmentt, well-known foreign exchange and steamship agent, has opened an office in the business section of Chicago's South Side under the name of "Parnoria" located at 9215 Commercial Avenue, 2nd floor. This office will be open for the convenience of South Side customers Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday, from 10 A.M. to 8 P.M. The loop office at 22 Quincy Street is open Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday.

    Odon Kmentt, well-known foreign exchange and steamship agent, has opened an office in the business section of Chicago's South Side under the name of "Parnoria" located at 9215 Commercial Avenue, ...

    Hungarian
    II A 2
  • Magyar Tribune -- December 19, 1924
    Old and New Hungarian-Americans (Editorial)

    The Hungarian immigration problem is a rather new problem. Hardly fifty years have passed since Hungarian immigration has been of any consequence at all. During the years directly preceding the World War, Hungarian immigration quota reached its height. Immediately after the World War, emigration from Hungary to the United States reached its peak again, but laws were enacted and quotas were set, which lessened the immigration work somewhat. The immigration laws of 1924 lowered the Hungarian quota to a minimum.

    When we speak of Hungarian-Americans, we must divide them into two groups; namely, those who immigrated before the War, and those who immigrated after the War. There is a great difference between the so-called old 2Hungarian-American and the new Hungarian-American. We find such a great difference between these two classes that it almost seems incredible. The first Hungarian immigration was caused by political activities in Hungary. So we can regard those immigrants who came to this country fifty or sixty years ago as political refugees. During the ten years previous to the War, economic conditions caused emigration from Hungary in large numbers, and naturally these immigrants were those who were hardest hit by economic conditions. During the ten years previous to the War, the immigrants from Hungary were the ordinary tillers of the soil, the peasant type, those who were accustomed to hard work, and these came in great numbers.

    We are now speaking of proven facts that after the World War the large majority of emigrants from Hungary were the better educated class in comparison to those who came previous to the War.

    In spite of the fact that the old immigrated Hungarian-Americans were 3tillers of the soil in the old country, upon their arrival here, they sought the faster moving and easier jobs in the factories. We will find very few Hungarian immigrants on farms. Naturally, the larger majority of them have settled in and around manufacturing centers, in certain industries such as: iron, steel, and in cotton mills where some are excellent workers.

    The old Hungarian-Americans were very slow in Americanizing themselves, quite unlike those who arrived in the more recent years. In some instances, we can still find the same Hungarian life existing in Hungarian societies which existed previous to the War, although the social life of the Hungarian-Americans has slowly changed. If we would study the different Hungarian communities in the United States, we would find non-sectarian sick benefit, religious, and theatrical societies, but among them we would note that the older immigrated Hungarians have very few 4representatives in these societies. They have been replaced by those immigrants who arrived in this country more recently, and those who possess the will and ability to share the worries and cares of organizational work. They have become tireless workers, because most of these people work hard during the day, and devote their spare time to work for the common interest of the Hungarians.

    The old Hungarian societies which were originally organized to create jobs of a common interest are still in existence. In considering the number of new and old immigrants and their activities, there is no comparison. The newly arrived immigrants are instilling new blood and new strength into the veins of the social life of the Hungarian-Americans, while the old immigrant is satisfied with his present state.

    Another fact which should be given attention concerns those immigrants who 5were very slow in becoming Americanized. They remained pure Hungarians for a long while after arriving here, and many could not speak the English language. It was seldom that one could meet a native Hungarian who could speak the English language fluently.

    Today, we find that immigrants who have arrived in this country a few months ago able to speak English fairly well. We are certain that within a very short time these people will be able to speak English very well.

    Since the World War, immigration laws have been enacted with many restrictions. Very often it is necessary for those who have made known their intention to come to this country to remain in the old country for two or three months longer, and during this time, they decided to learn the English language. After being in the United States for one or two years, it would not be unusual to see these immigrants reading English newspapers.

    6

    It is interesting to note the ease with which these Hungarian immigrants adopt the customs and habits of this new land, while the old Hungarian immigrants took decades to change, or never adapted themselves to American society. The new Hungarian immigrant has found it much easier to break into the social life of the American people.

    There was a very good article in the New York Times on October 26, 1924 whose title was "Hungarians Be Upon Us," with the sub-title: "Budapest, Like Moscow and Berlin, Undertakes to Monopolize the New York Stage." This article deals with the activities of Hungarian-American Theatrical companies which have presented plays on the stages of fourteen theatres of Broadway.

    The Hungarian immigration problem is a rather new problem. Hardly fifty years have passed since Hungarian immigration has been of any consequence at all. During the years directly preceding the ...

    Hungarian
    III G, I C, III A, II A 2, III B 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 20, 1925
    Samuel Ladanyi

    The news of the death of Samuel Ladanyi was like a thunderbolt from the sky striking into the hearts of the Chicago Hungarians. This man who a short time ago was full of vitality and great plans has left us, [and we are shocked by such a catastrophe].

    Samuel Ladanyi was born on Jan. 2, 1867, in Szabolcs County, Hungary. After completing his education, like many thousands of other Hungarians, he found it hard to locate himself in the industrial life of Hungary, so he decided to migrate to America.

    At first he settled in New York City where he suffered many hardships, as did all immigrants. But these hardships and trials only spurred his ambition to become a success.

    2

    He came to Chicago a few decades ago, and during the Chicago World's Fair introduced the Hungarian frankfurter to the American public. His frankfurters became so popular that he and his uncle organized what is known today as the Vienna Sauage Mfg. Co. In the last ten years he has been a pioneer in the development of smoked meats. His sausage factory prospered, and as the years went by it became larger and larger, until today it is one of the largest of its kind. Its yearly business amounts to more than a million dollars.

    Samuel Ladanyi became a wealthy man. He did not [make the same mistake which other Hungarians who acquired wealth, made--i. e. adopt a superior attitude toward their poorer brethren]. He remained the same, common, ordinary man. [His simplicity]was shown in his home and in [his method of]handling people.

    Although he behaved as a common, ordinary man, his thoughts, feelings and 3activities made him a great man.

    Samuel Ladanyi was an honest man, a good Hungarian, and a loyal Jew. These three characteristics were blended so well within him that he was loved by all who came in contact with him.

    He glorified the Hungarian nation because regardless of whom he met, he was always proud to acknowledge his Hungarian descent.

    He was always willing to donate to a good cause. He never showed partiality. His activities were governed by the dictates of the Old Testament. He practiced the dictum that what his right hand did, his left hand knew nothing of. There was never a worth-while Hungarian activity which he did not support. No one left his home empty handed. He was a great supporter of all cultural activities amongst the Hungarians and gave aid to their theatrical projects.

    A man can be a hard worker--he can be wealthy and wise--but if he can't 4gain the confidence of his fellow man, his life is one without purpose. Fame and fortune die, but the activities and the results of those activities remain [and influence the future].

    The fact that eight hundred businessmen were present [at the funeral] to pay their last respects to the man who had been so humanitarian, testifies to the respect which he commanded, and the love that existed for him among the Hungarians in Chicago.

    The educated and the uneducated, the rich and the poor, can feel that someone of great importance has passed away because a great man was lowered into his grave, to rest in peace.

    The news of the death of Samuel Ladanyi was like a thunderbolt from the sky striking into the hearts of the Chicago Hungarians. This man who a short time ago ...

    Hungarian
    IV, II A 2, I D 1 a
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 03, 1925
    The Faithful Joseph Byfield

    In the history of the Hungarian Americans there is one individual whose career is almost incomparable, and the man to whom we refer is the popular Joseph Byfield. There is hardly a Hungarian, regardless of whether he is a greenhorn or an old timer in America, who has not heard of the proprietor of the Sherman, Dearborn and Ambassador Hotels.

    Mr. Byfield was fourteen years old when he came to the United States. His uncle once took him to the old Sherman House and asked him how he liked it, and he replied prophetically that some day he would be the owner of that hotel. As we all know, when Joseph Byfield became a man, the hotel became his. Joseph Byfield was not only a leader in the hotel business, he also was interested in the manufacture of restaurant equipment, in the canning industry, and in the manufacture of cotton goods.

    When the City of Gary was first opened as a subdivision, Mr. Byfield saw 2the great possibilities [of the town] and he purchased large tracts of land which he later sold at a great profit. He also has large real-estate holdings in Chicago.

    Joseph Byfield has not taken a very active part in Hungarian activities, but his thoughts and feelings are still truly Hungarian. This fact was proved when on September 22, 1918 he donated the use of the White City Stadium to the Hungarian republican movements which were starting in Chicago at that time; on this occasion he was also one of the prominent speakers. Among the many things he said was the following:

    The Hungarian people as a nation never had a greater enemy than the Hapsburg family. The Hungarians of America know very well, and can understand what it means when a state, in this present period, must live under the rule of imbeciles. The Hungarian-Americans found out what real liberty was, in this country. So naturally the creation of an independent Hungary means little, unless that independence is combined with democracy. But a democracy 3can only be established and can only be successful in a republican state; the only way we can assure the future of Hungary now that it is independent is by removing the Hapsburg king from his throne and making it a seat of democracy for the Hungarian republic.

    Mr. Byfield's remarks received thunderous applause, and then when everyone had quited down, he made a promise. He promised that he would be willing to sacrifice his entire wealth in order that the Hungarian republic might be realized. According to his statements, Hungary would never be in a position to take the correct steps unless we Hungarians are available to give advice to those in Hungary, so we must wake up. We have a great job ahead of us, and the alarm has sounded; we must answer. Joseph Byfield then read a telegram received from Toby Rubovitz, who is one of the oldest leaders in the fight for a republic. The contents of the telegram were as follows:

    If the Hungarian people wished for a republic during Kossuth's time, they wish for it now more than ever. They can't speak because they are muzzled, 4They cannot act because their hands are tied; for these reasons we in America must act. These words are highly applicable to the situation existing in Hungary today. We all know that it was Joseph Byfield who was instrumental in promoting child welfare work among the children of Hungary. We collected $55,000 for this fund and $2,000 of this was donated by Joseph Byfield.

    When Dr. Balthazar, bishop of the Hungarian Reformed Church, was in Chicago for the first time, Joseph Byfield donated a large sum of money for the cause of cultural development in Hungary. There has hardly been an instance when donations were needed by individuals or groups that he has not given wholeheartedly as long as the cause was worthy.

    At the time that the names became known of those Hungarian-Americans who had received distinguished service crosses, the name of Joseph Byfield could not be found among them. Even though the Hungarian people turn away from thoughts of the terror-ridden Horthy regime, they cannot understand why Joseph Byfield never received any mention of recognition when he was the 5one who deserved it more than anyone else. The omission of his name seemed very odd to us, so we thought we would get the facts. We looked up Mr. Byfield and asked him if he knew why he had not been honored. His simple answer was that Scheffbeck, the Hungarian consul, wanted to decorate him with the Horthy distinguished service cross but he would not accept it because sometime ago, he had refused to accept the American distinguished service medal.

    Here is a man who has remained loyal to the promise which he made in 1918. He has remained faithful and loyal. The Hungarians have always respected Joseph Byfield, but for his latest patriotic deeds the Hungarians have locked him in their hearts and will think of him always with deep appreciation. We sincerely hope that the example set by Mr. Byfield will be a guide in showing us the duties of Hungarian-Americans.

    In the history of the Hungarian Americans there is one individual whose career is almost incomparable, and the man to whom we refer is the popular Joseph Byfield. There is ...

    Hungarian
    IV, I E, III H, II A 2, II D 10
  • Otthon -- October 11, 1925
    Million Dollar Hotel Being Built by Hungarian

    p.2...........Andor Halasz our countryman from Miskolc is planning to build a twelve story hotel in Chicago. The site of the new hotel is at the South west corner of Leland and Racine Avenues. The hotel will be named the Uptown Square Hotel and will cost one million one hundred thousand dollars. The hotel will be built of red brick and limestone and will have 225 rooms with baths. There will be a roof garden dining room.

    The Chicago Hungarians are glad that one of their number has achieved such success.

    p.2...........Andor Halasz our countryman from Miskolc is planning to build a twelve story hotel in Chicago. The site of the new hotel is at the South west corner of Leland ...

    Hungarian
    II A 2, IV, II F
  • Otthon -- March 07, 1926
    Chicago Women's Handicraft Exposition

    p.2... Preparations are being made for the second Women's Handicraft Exposition.

    This exposition is very important to the Hungarians, because last year they didn't take part. The Hungarian women's art craft is well known all over the world, and the Hungarian Consul, Mr. Schefbeck,secured from the management a suitable place to display the offering. The Hungarian Chamber of Commerce promised to send material for the exposition. The Hungarian women are requested to bring needlework and other art craft material.

    The exposition will be from April 17 to 24.

    p.2... Preparations are being made for the second Women's Handicraft Exposition. This exposition is very important to the Hungarians, because last year they didn't take part. The Hungarian women's art ...

    Hungarian
    II A 3 a, II A 2, II B 1 c 3
  • Magyar Tribune -- September 03, 1926
    Julius Rosenwald by Ignatz Izsak. (Editorial)

    The editorial staff of this newspaper can never be accused of siding with the big capitalists, nor can we be charged with ever asking them for help of any kind.

    We have always claimed that the big capitalists, whether they were industrialists, manufacturers, or landowners, could be of service to mankind only if they paid their workers a living wage, or a wage that would provide the worker with the same luxuries possessed by the capitalists themselves.

    As long as the capitalistic system is in existence, the worker will never 2receive the full amount that he has earned for the capitalists. Even when industry slows down and people are out of work, nothing is done by the capitalists to provide a living for the unfortunate. In our estimation, the least they could do would be to set aside, for just such emergencies, a part of the enormous profits that they make.

    If we compare the European, especially the Hungarian, capitalists with the American capitalists, we find a great deal of difference. In Hungary, the priests, the aristocrats, and the gentry never try to aid the poor in any way; even when they [the priests, etc.] die, they do not leave any part of their fortune to public institutions so that the general public might benefit therefrom. Every once in a while, it happens that a sum of money is left to a school for tuition purposes, but if this does occur, the only ones that benefit from these funds are those who are related to the donor.

    In America, if a person becomes wealthy, he tries to do something to benefit 3everyone. Regardless of what motives induce him to donate a part of his fortune to the public, the donor realizes that some part of his fortune belongs to those people that helped him acquire his great wealth. He knows that his success is largely due to the support of the public.

    There are wealthier men in the United States than Julius Rosenwald, but there are very few that have donated as much money for the public welfare as he has. The donations by Rosenwald amount to millions [of dollars], and when he contributes a sum, he makes no distinction regarding race, color, creed, or nationality.

    He has made many notable donations, but we think that his latest is the best. We know that other nationalities will derive as much benefit from it as the American people. Julius Rosenwald has contributed the sum of three million dollars toward the rebuilding of the Fine Arts building in Jackson Park. The 4three million dollars is to be used to establish an industrial museum in the Fine Arts building.

    This museum is of interest to all. But we Hungarian-Americans should be especially interested in it because most of our people are engaged in industry here in this country. The museum will be of special interest to the young people because the sight of these miniature machines in operation will develop many inventive geniuses. At the same time, the exhibits will be an educational topic of conversation.

    The idea of this industrial museum was born to him while he was traveling in Hungary, when he and his little son visited an industrial museum in Becs, Hungary. As he was about to leave the museum, his son became so interested in the different mechanical exhibits that he [Rosenwald] had to take the youngster back several times before the latter would consent to visit other places. Rosenwald decided that a museum such as this would be interesting to young and old alike, and so we in Chicago are fortunate.

    The editorial staff of this newspaper can never be accused of siding with the big capitalists, nor can we be charged with ever asking them for help of any kind. ...

    Hungarian
    I D 1 a, IV, II B 2 b, I E, I C, II A 2
  • Magyar Tribune -- August 26, 1927
    A Charming Newcomer

    In spite of the immigration quota, the Hungarian colony of Chicago, thank God, is growing.

    Our colony has become richer by the addition of Elizabeth R. Mathe, graduate pharmacist, who, having settled in Chicago, bought the North Park Pharmacy.

    The newly stocked pharmacy; its new owner, who has had wide experience as a pharmacist; its shelves of imported and domestic medicines, perfumes, and cosmetics, will please all who visit the store.

    In spite of the immigration quota, the Hungarian colony of Chicago, thank God, is growing. Our colony has become richer by the addition of Elizabeth R. Mathe, graduate pharmacist, who, ...

    Hungarian
    II A 2
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 23, 1928
    The Chicago People's Theater, Inc., Organized

    The Chicago People's Theater under the direction of Jeno Endrey has had four successful years of activity in Chicago. Unlike other Hungarian theatrical companies, this company was stationary and the patronage of the theater-going public enabled the members of the company to make a decent livelihood. The most interesting feature of the business methods of the Chicago People's Theater is that last season eight hundred season tickets were sold. This insured a full house at each performance.

    The management now announces that the Chicago People's Theater is being incorporated with a capital of ten thousand dollars. Hereafter the company will have a touring troupe of twenty members, their own orchestra and theatrical props. They will tour the country in their own bus. The record of the company is sufficient guaranty of their future success.

    The Magyar Tribune records its pleasure at this new cultural effort, which is 2destined to keep the Magyar spirit alive in a strange land.

    The Chicago People's Theater under the direction of Jeno Endrey has had four successful years of activity in Chicago. Unlike other Hungarian theatrical companies, this company was stationary and the ...

    Hungarian
    II A 3 d 1, IV, II A 2