The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Magyar Tribune -- March 15, 1917
    March 15, Hungarian Independence Day

    The Chicago District First Hungarian Social and Benevolent Lodge will hold the national Hungarian Independence Day celebration.

    The program will consist of speeches by prominent men, soloists and choruses singing prominent folk songs. All good patriotic Hungarians are urged to be present.

    The Chicago District First Hungarian Social and Benevolent Lodge will hold the national Hungarian Independence Day celebration. The program will consist of speeches by prominent men, soloists and choruses singing ...

    Hungarian
    III B 3 a, II A 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- June 29, 1917
    New Hungarian Doctor

    Dr. Armin Loven who received his medical training in Chicago, but who has been practicing medicine in the city of Toledo for the past few years will soon return to Chicago. Dr. Loven was well liked by the Hungarians in Toledo and had a very successful practice there. His relatives and friends have asked him to return to Chicago.

    Dr. Armin Loven who received his medical training in Chicago, but who has been practicing medicine in the city of Toledo for the past few years will soon return to ...

    Hungarian
    II A 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- August 30, 1918
    Hungarian Political Organization

    There will be a great political fight this Spring and Fall because the State, County and City elections are coming up.

    The Hungarian-American citizens do not want to lose the opportunity to aid the election of the man of their choice.

    Therefore, we can mention the factors necessary for starting a political organization.

    We know that the Hungarian-American citizens have favored the Democratic party.

    It was back in 1905 that there was an organization under the title of 2"The Hungarian-American Democracy," which society was granted a charter. It was in this organization that the Chicago Hungarian-Americans gained recognition as Democrats.

    The organizing committee consists of such prominent men as Joseph Fekete, prominent Hungarian lawyer, Dr. Ernest Lovenger, and Louis Zidrou.

    This organization intends to take an active part in the present primary elections, but it is more important to become organized and take active interest in the Fall elections. By doing this, this organization can develope into an organization of influence keeping future elections in mind.

    The main objective of this organization will be to familiarize the 3Hungarian-American citizens with their rights as citizens of this country, in order that these people may be able to take part in the political history of this country.

    It would be a great achievement to see the Hungarians go to the polls to vote in great masses. They should take a big part in the decision of important questions which would be in the interest of their fellow American citizens, as well as in the interest of the country from which we came.

    There will be a great political fight this Spring and Fall because the State, County and City elections are coming up. The Hungarian-American citizens do not want to lose the ...

    Hungarian
    I F 2, I F 1, III A, IV, II A 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- July 30, 1920
    A Political Interview (Editorial)

    The United States is preparing for the coming presidential election, and it seems to me that the Hungarians should start preparations for it also.

    I did not find it difficult to locate someone who had enlightening information about politics in the United States. There is only one real Hungarian politician in Chicago. There are many so-called "curb-stone" politicians, who do a lot of talking without accomplishing anything, but there is one Hungarian who is very active and influential in the political life of this country. He is Dr. Adolf Weiner, a lawyer. Therefore, I decided to visit Dr. Weiner, who is located on the fifth floor of the Cook County Building. Dr. Weiner greeted me very cordially, guessing immediately that I was the editor of a Hungarian newspaper, and that I was about to ask for an interview. Dr. Weiner asked me what I wanted, and I immediately answered that I was looking for political information, and that I would like to hear his views on the presidential election.

    2

    "I will tell you in advance", said Dr. Weiner, "that I am a Democrat, but regardless of this fact my belief is that Cox has the best chance of being elected."

    Dr. Weiner then went on to speak of the platforms of the two political parties, pointing out the advantages of the Democratic platform as compared with the Republican. He explained that the tariff question was the important issue of the campaign. He expressed himself also on the Volstead Act, stating that, in his opinion, Cox was liberal enough to see the uselessness of this law.

    I then asked him which party he thought would help Hungary, and the Hungarians of America, the most. As he answered this question, a sad look came over his face, but he gave me his honest opinion. "As far as Hungary is concerned," he said, "it does not make very much difference who becomes president of the United States." He stated that the only ways in which conditions could be remedied in Hungary would be by the enactment of new laws, by more conscientious work on the part of the Hungarian government itself, and by the co-operation 3of the people for a better government.

    Dr. Weiner told me that the part of Hungary from which he originally came was now Czechoslovakian territory. He said that he was still Hungarian in heart and soul, even though he has been a resident of this country for the past twenty-seven years. I might mention here that Dr. Weiner received his education in the city of Vienna, and for the past twenty-five years has been one of the most prominent lawyers in Chicago.

    The last question I asked Dr. Weiner was whether he thought it possible to form a political organization among the Hungarian people of Chicago, and, if such an organization were formed, which party it should support.

    "Organizing Hungarian-Americans", Dr. Weiner answered, "is a very hard job. The Republicans always vote for the Republican candidate, and the Democrats 4for the Democratic candidate, but if Hungarians were to organize, each member would want to be the leader of his organization. This is the worst fault of the Hungarians. If there were four thousand members, there would be four thousand leaders. The Hungarian-Americans have not learned the principles of co-operation, and would rather vote for a Slav or an Irishman than for a Hungarian. This is the reason Hungarian politicians do not get anywhere; if they do get a public office, they obtain it without the aid of their brother Hungarians."

    Dr. Weiner advised us that Cox, the Democratic presidential candidate, if elected, would probably do more for Hungary than any of the other candidates, because the Democrats have a more liberal platform with reference to foreign policy and immigration. The Republicans have always taken a harsh stand against immigration.

    The Hungarian-Americans are mostly industrial workers, and the Democratic party is a workers' party. Candidate Cox has been governor of Ohio for 5three terms, each time being elected by the vote of the great number of industrial workers of Ohio. Therefore, it is clear that, if the Hungarian workers are to cast their votes to the best advantage, they must vote Democratic.

    I now left Dr. Weiner, fully satisfied that I had been right in going to see him, because I feel sure that Dr. Weiner understands the social problems of America. I am grateful that he talked with me, neglecting other and more important people who were waiting to see him. Furthermore, he told me that he would be glad to discuss the political question again at any time with any representative of the Magyar Tribune.

    The United States is preparing for the coming presidential election, and it seems to me that the Hungarians should start preparations for it also. I did not find it difficult ...

    Hungarian
    I F 5, IV, I B 1, II A 1, I F 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- August 22, 1924
    The Immigrant Hungarian-American Doctor

    A few months ago during an interview in Budapest, Berthold Singor, American consul, predicted that, those professional men who are being driven out of Hungary would be taken care of by the United States, and that he would make it his business to see that this would be done.

    The honorable consul's prediction has come true, because in the past two years sixteen learned young doctors have come to Chicago from Hungary. Most of these have opened their own offices, probably not earning a great deal at the present time, but they have high hopes for the future. We feel that we should single out one in particular, and that is Dr. Tivadar Koppanyi, who came to this country through an invitation extended to him by the University of Chicago to accept a position as professor of biology. Doctor Koppanyi is only twenty-three years old but has already gained recognition in his particular field. The daily American press has already expressed their recognition of the achievements of this young doctor.

    2

    Another immigrant, Doctor Szekely, is a consulting doctor at the nearby Napierville Tuberculosis Sanitarium. Doctor Klinger is a surgeon at the Western Electric Company's hospital. Doctor Zeisler, one of the youngest doctors from Hungary, has been placed in the dispensary of the Michael Reese Hospital, devoting himself to the study of internal ailments.

    Doctor Zeisler has been in this country for only the short period of six months. Last month he passed his State examination and has opened offices at 3100 So. Halsted Street.

    We want to call the attention of all Hungarians on the South Side to the fact that this young doctor is well worth considering, because he is so well versed in medics, and his medical skill is unquestionable.

    A few months ago during an interview in Budapest, Berthold Singor, American consul, predicted that, those professional men who are being driven out of Hungary would be taken care of ...

    Hungarian
    III G, II A 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- August 22, 1924
    Hungarian Doctors' Conferences

    Of late, conditions have changed so greatly in Hungary that they have caused a large number of professional people to emigrate. Of these professional people a large number are doctors, many of whom have come to Chicago and settled opening their practice here.

    Because many of these doctors are unacquainted with one another, Dr. Oscar Offner took it upon himself to bring these men together for an evening where they might get better acquainted with one another. So last Wednesday night at the Schwartz Restaurant, this meeting was called together at which time there were twenty-three doctors present.

    It was decided that these get-togethers would be held monthly in order that different topics relating to the medical profession might be discussed, and many of the new theories of medicine threshed out.

    2

    This is the first time that the Hungarian doctors of Chicago have ever tried anything like this.

    Of late, conditions have changed so greatly in Hungary that they have caused a large number of professional people to emigrate. Of these professional people a large number are doctors, ...

    Hungarian
    II B 2 g, III G, III A, II A 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- August 14, 1925
    Dr. Arpad Barothy

    After participating in the unsuccessful fight for Hungarian liberty, the father of Dr. Arpad Barothy emigrated to America. He settled in Iowa, where he became a farmer. He offered his services to his adopted country during the Civil War, and acquitted himself with honor.

    His son Arpad is a native-born American, and has travelled extensively throughout the United States. When Dr. Arpad Barothy was nineteen years of age, he visited his father's homeland. The memory of that visit will live with him until his dying day.

    Young Arpad selected the medical profession as his life career. He was a pioneer in the development of electrical therapy, and became one of the best known doctors in Chicago.

    Dr. Arpad Barothy is a staunch advocate of farm development. He believes 2that every man should have a certain amount of land to which he can retire when he becomes too old to work and where he can make his own living for the remainder of his days. Doctor Barothy owns large farms in Michigan, and he plans to buy a large tract of lend in Florida in the near future.

    Doctor Barothy is a true Hungarian. He is a tireless fighter for the truth, and he is a modest and good-hearted individual. He has performed a countless number of good deeds among both Hungarians and Americans. He is greatly interested in art, music, literature, and the theater. There has hardly been a Hungarian visitor to Chicago who has not enjoyed the hospitality of Doctor Barothy's home.

    He was president of the Hungarian-American Federation. During the World War, he was a leader in the western division of the Loyalty League. He is honorary president of the Chicago Hungarian University Club. He is also a member of many American societies. There is hardly a Hungarian activity that he is not interested in and for which he does not work untiringly.

    3

    Doctor Barothy's home is located near the lake front. He owns many works of art by celebrated painters and sculptors, which are famous throughout the world.

    His wife is a well-educated American. Her interests are centered in social work and literary activities. They have two children, both boys, who embody the true Hungarian ideal of manhood.

    [Translators note.- Doctor Barothy is still active in the field of medicine in Chicago. He is one of the oldest, if not the oldest, Hungarian residents of Chicago. He is still active in all Hungarian functions, and is an authority on Hungarian history in Chicago.]

    After participating in the unsuccessful fight for Hungarian liberty, the father of Dr. Arpad Barothy emigrated to America. He settled in Iowa, where he became a farmer. He offered his ...

    Hungarian
    II A 1, I L, IV
  • Magyar Tribune -- September 18, 1925
    Dr. Stephen Barat

    A very serious incident has taken place in the lives of the Chicago Hungarians. One of their most active members was taken by death last Tuesday morning.

    Dr. Stephen Barat received his education in Budapest and Prague. After finishing his internship, he left Hungary for the southern part of Europe. At first he settled in Sofia and later he moved to Constantinople. The Turkish noblemen recognized the ability of this young Hungarian doctor, and in a short time he was one of the best-known doctors in the Turkish capital.

    He came to Chicago twenty-five years ago, and established himself on the South Side, in the Bryn Mawr community where the population was very small. His familiarity with many languages made him a very popular doctor on the South Side where there were immigrants from all over the world.

    He was a very active man not only in his professional field, but he also took part 2in all social functions. He became a member of the different business and political associations where he was recognized for his superior European education. He became the official doctor for the Illinois Steel Company, where he introduced many improvements in the medical treatment of the men of that company. The political world recognized his ability and good common sense, and his ideas and suggestions were followed in many instances.

    Dr. Barat was a leader in all Hungarian activities. He was a typical, outspoken, brave Hungarian man. He belonged to the old school, to which truth and respectability were sacred rights. In 1918 he took a very active part in the Hungarian-American movement for a Hungarian republic. He had very strong democratic ideas about the liberation of Hungary.

    His main interest was the Hungarian University Club, of which he had been president several times. His enthusiasm was a great inspiration to his co-workers.

    During the World War he sacrificed a great deal of service, and the American 3officials honored him with recognition in many instances. Dr. Barat had a personality which was well liked by everyone. He was considered a great humorist and he was accorded honor for this at all social gatherings which he attended. His death is a loss which can't be replaced, because his leadership and his enthusiastic activities among the South Side Hungarians will not be replaced for a long time.

    The Hungarians of Chicago and the vicinity will remember him always with great respect. His activities and his good deeds will never be forgotten by those who were close to him. Dr. Barat was truly a good Hungarian-American warrior. May he rest in peace.

    A very serious incident has taken place in the lives of the Chicago Hungarians. One of their most active members was taken by death last Tuesday morning. Dr. Stephen Barat ...

    Hungarian
    II A 1, III B 2, III D, III H, IV
  • Otthon -- January 27, 1927
    Anton Feller, Architect at the Magyar Club.

    p.2....Anton Feller, professor of architecture at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts, was the guest of honor Jan. 19 at the Magyar Club of Chicago. He talked about the progress of modern art. Before Prof. Feller came to Chicago he taught in the Far East.

    The topic of his discourse was an analysis of the progress of the cubistic futuristic, expressionistic, and impressionistic trends and formations. He talked about the works of Van Gogh, Kokoschka and Picasso and showed illustrations.

    p.2....Anton Feller, professor of architecture at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts, was the guest of honor Jan. 19 at the Magyar Club of Chicago. He talked about the progress ...

    Hungarian
    II B 2 g, II A 3 c, II A 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- May 06, 1927
    Career of a Young Hungarian Doctor Hungarian Child Specialist on the North Side

    We are always happy to publish accounts of the successes of our countrymen. At this time Dr. Martin Zeisler, child specialist, arouses our interest. He was mentioned in this publication several months ago in connection with a notable surgical achievement. Since that time Dr. Zeisler has received a permanent appointment to a staff position at the Children's Memorial Hospital. This hospital is known to be the best in Chicago in the field of children's diseases.

    The Children's Memorial Hospital, 712 Fullerton Avenue, with 250 beds, helps about 20,000 children each year to get well. The staff members are all well-known specialists. To be on this staff is an honor and a career in itself, and the Hungarians can be proud to see one of our compatriots in such a post.

    Dr. Zeisler is to be commended for never having been ashamed of the fact that he is Hungarian, on the contrary, we know that whenever he had the opportunity, he has given special attention to Hungarian children.

    2

    We are glad to hear that this young doctor with such a fine career, has opened another office, in addition to his Lawrence Avenue location, at 1166 Diversey Parkway.....

    Considering that the Chicago Hungarians do not have another child specialist, we welcome this new doctor because it is time for the Hungarians to recognize the American spirit which sees its future national wealth and happiness in the children.

    We are always happy to publish accounts of the successes of our countrymen. At this time Dr. Martin Zeisler, child specialist, arouses our interest. He was mentioned in this publication ...

    Hungarian
    II A 1, I C, IV, IV