The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Magyar Tribune -- March 15, 1917
    Hungarians Victims of Hyenas

    The trusting and kind hearted Hungarians were very easy victims of the swindlers and had many hard earned dollars taken away from them.

    When immigration was at its height, the Hungarians thought that they were coming to this country as mere guests of America, therefore they did not think it necessary to learn to read and write the English language. There were, however, a few exceptions and out of these exception rose the swindling hyenas.

    The unfortunate immigrants could not look for work, they could not write English, they could not sell, they could not buy. In other words they could not do anything unless they consulted one of the people who could read and write both Hungarian and English.

    2

    The oldest and most profitable racket was the employment racket. When the poor foreigner came to this country he was very unfamiliar with working conditions. So these labor racketeers would sign them up as strike-breakers, or put them to work clearing forests or put them down in mines making them work under very unhealthy conditions, and the wages for the most of these jobs were nothing but slavery wages. But this kind of a racketeering is a thing of the past, mostly due to the fact that the Hungarian press and the government have gotten after them. But as this racket faded a new one took its place.

    The people gradually became acquainted with their surroundings and being of a thrifty class of people they began to save some money. So then racketeers invented new schemes to relieve the Hungarians of their wealth.

    With the development of fraternal organizations, such great depredations took place that these organizations remain as a sore spot in the hearts of the Hungarians. There was for example an organization that offered twenty-five dollars sick benefit and a 3policy worth five-hundred dollars in case of death. This was purely a fraudulent scheme. When the time came to collect, the policy proved to be nothing but a one dollar railroad ticket. We know of localities where as many as twenty-five families were involved, each family paying twenty-five dollars cash for this supposed protection.

    Now there are other rackets such as stocks and bonds, property that does not exist, and patent medicines. One of the greatest foes of these rackets, the one that has cut this racketeering down a great deal is the Hungarian Miners News.

    This racketeering not only hurt the wealth of the people but it also makes it hard for the legitimate business man to sell reputable product. Now the better class of business people are starting to recognize the value of the business that might be had from the Hungarians in Chicago and other Eastern cities. We think it necessary to mention the Union Pacific Railroad and Fred H. Bartlett Realty Company, who have 4lent a hand in doing away with the racketeering hyenas who preyed on the Hungarian people. These two organizations offered their services and are willing to give advice of any nature.

    We therefore urge the Hungarian people to learn from the experiences of others and do business with firms, organization doctors, that have a well established reputation. This article is meant to be an article to educate the Hungarian people to be on their guard against swindling hyenas.

    The trusting and kind hearted Hungarians were very easy victims of the swindlers and had many hard earned dollars taken away from them. When immigration was at its height, the ...

    Hungarian
    I H, II E 1, II E 2, II E 3
  • Magyar Tribune -- June 29, 1917
    Bread, Whiskey and Beer (Editorial)

    Recently there were two very important news items revealed to the public. One of these came from Washington, D.C., stating that the House of Representatives had passed a resolution in regard to food regulation in this country. This regulation prohibits the use of barley or rye for the manufacture of liquor. The other news item comes from England with reference to their barley and rye crop being insufficient to amply supply the breweries. Since the law prohibiting the manufacture of alcoholic liquors will be enacted, it will make the country dry during the war. This law is not being brought about because this country's crop is insufficient to supply the needs of the nation, but it is because of our alliance in war with other nations. This makes it our duty to provide food to people living in those countries, especially England. So the government of this country needs to divide the crops in such manner that we will retain a certain amount, the rest to be divided among the allies. It seems as though the law enacted by Congress is for this purpose, but looks are 2deceiving. The truth of the matter is that politics are playing its part. The Temperance League is going to make use of the situation, thereby making this move look like a patriotic move, but at the same time taking a great step towards their objective for which they have been working for some time.

    The English news item makes the resolution enacted by the House of Representative of the United States a laughable matter. The law prohibited the manufacture of alcholic liquors in the United States so England will be supplied with material to manufacture alcoholic beverages. In England beer or ale is considered one of the necessities of life for a worker. In the United States the law makers are not far-sighted enough to see this. In the name of the people of the United States they give up the manufacture of alcoholic beverages, in order that the Engligh people be supplied with plenty of it.

    Practically all the nations involved in the war have made restrictions with reference to the use of alcohol, but none of them have closed their breweries or wineries. The German people who have felt the effects of the war more than any nation can still drink beer and their beer is manufactured from barley just as ours was.

    3

    If the United States thinks that it is absolutely necessary to prohibit the use of barley by the manufacturers,we cannot speak against it. But this necessity can only come when and if the nations that consume our barley quit manufacturing beer out of it. England should be the first nation to do this. But if the English find that beer is a necessity, then it must be a necessity in the United States also.

    Recently there were two very important news items revealed to the public. One of these came from Washington, D.C., stating that the House of Representatives had passed a resolution in ...

    Hungarian
    I B 1, I H, I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- July 13, 1917
    Down with Whiskey!

    Whiskey is dead! For the duration of the war the people living in the United States will not be able to drink whiskey. During the recent session of Congress the United States was declared bone-dry.

    The law not only prohibits the manufacture of liquor in the United States, but also prohibits the importation of whiskey from foreign countries. This does not mean that this law is a measure to economize food supplies. It is intended to stop the people in the United States from drinking; and it is not a victory in food economy, but a victory for the Temperance League. The law does not prohibit the manufacture of beer and wine. It authorizes the government to take over all whiskey stocks in warehouses. The government must, of course, pay for the whiskey it confiscates, allowing a ten per cent profit to the manufacturer. The bill has been passed, but the House wants to prohibit the sale of all alcoholic beverages. We feel quite certain that the Senate will not approve of this.

    2

    No one can estimate accurately how much whiskey is stored in warehouses, but there must be between two-hundred and three-hundred million gallons. It will cost the government almost one-thousand million dollars to buy up all this whiskey, and at the same time it will be losing four-hundred million dollars a year in taxes. We, the people, will pay for whiskey we do not drink.

    Whiskey is dead! For the duration of the war the people living in the United States will not be able to drink whiskey. During the recent session of Congress the ...

    Hungarian
    I B 1, I H
  • Magyar Tribune -- September 14, 1917
    More Criminals Than Can Be Handled

    This newspaper has received numerous inquiries from Hungarian citizens in regards to why so many criminals are out on the streets, when they should be behind bars in jails. This condition has impressed other people also. They in turn have called Sheriff Traeger's attention to the facts. The reason he gives for this condition is that the Cook County Jail is filled to more than capacity. The jail was built to accommodate five hundred and twenty people and at present there are eight hundred and twenty occupants. The crime rate has risen so fast that the sheriff will have to provide for more than twelve hundred prisoners within a very short time. But there is no room at the present time to take care of these criminals; arrangements are being made, whereby the criminals will be rounded up and there will be enough room for them all. So if the citizens will wait a while, everything will be taken care of.

    This newspaper has received numerous inquiries from Hungarian citizens in regards to why so many criminals are out on the streets, when they should be behind bars in jails. This ...

    Hungarian
    I H
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 14, 1919
    The Workers Want Beer

    From Union headquarters, Ernest Bohm, president of the Central Federated Unions, reports that he has sent letters to all locals advising them that the Union is declaring a nation-wide strike if the sale of beer and light wines is prohibited. Mr. Bohm said that he would withdraw strike movements, providing the prohibition movement is withdrawn.

    This strike movement is being encouraged not only because the average worker needs light wines and beer, but also to keep over one million people at work. If prohibition in the fullest sense went into effect, over one million workers would be thrown out of work. Consequently, every line of trade would be affected.

    We must remind the people that this strike threat is not a bluff. The workers 2will drive this point with all the seriousness that they can command. This Union has over a million members who will drop work immediately.

    The working class is openly declaring itself against Prohibition. From day to day, open declarations are made that the workingman has a right to indulge in drinking light wines and beer in order to stimulate his tired body. By this, they do not mean that they want to drink the deadly poisonous whiskey, but they would enjoy a refreshing glass of wine or beer.

    The Prohibition question is continually causing unrest among the workers. This unrest will bring about a very serious situation, if the prohibitionists cannot see the viewpoint of the working-man on this question.

    From Union headquarters, Ernest Bohm, president of the Central Federated Unions, reports that he has sent letters to all locals advising them that the Union is declaring a nation-wide strike ...

    Hungarian
    I B 1, I D 2 a 4, I D 2 c, I H
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 28, 1919
    Chicago to Vote on Temeerance Question

    Recently, there have been published numerous articles for and against the use of alcoholic beverages.

    There has been a countless number of people who have attempted to write articles about the evils of drink in a very dramatic manner. They are trying to prove that the hereditary ills, such as insanity, and many other hardships of life, are due to alcoholism. They tell us that alcohol cuts down a man's ambition, and his capacity to work, at the same time slowly destroying the spiritual and physical capacity of man.

    We will admit these facts, but at the same time we think that these are exceptions. The evils of alcohol are apparent only where individuals 2use or drink to excess. The enemies of alcohol are using these facts to win the majority on their side. These facts should not make an argument strong enough to convince an intelligent people to swing with those forces that are against alcoholic beverages, and deprive the majority of their civil liberties.

    Prohibition of alcohol is nothing more or less than the minority forcing something against the will of the majority. These troubles of alcoholism are natural, and cannot be rectified by the enactment of laws prohibiting the use of alcohol.

    The weakness of man can only be corrected by teaching and proper leadership.

    Those who indulge in alcoholic beverages to excess are not criminals, and are not detrimental to society of today, nor are they detrimental 3to the laws of today. Therefore, no one has a right to deprive these people of their individual liberties.

    There are daily attacks against individual liberty. These attacks are not forced on the people by armed forces, but by the enactment of laws made by people who are against individual liberty.

    The intelligent voter should not allow himself to be stripped of a liberty, because a few people are so strongly opposed to alcohol. Temperance is a golden path, and the intelligent man or woman voter will know what is required of them on April first when they make this very important decision. We, the lovers of freedom, must answer these fanatic reformers.

    4

    These fanatics want to bring about absolute prohibition, and they want to declare it a criminal offense for anyone in indulge in the drinking of light wines and beer.

    We must protect our homes against these invaders and confiscators of personal liberty.

    Ladies and gentlemen, we urge, you to vote against Prohibition.

    Recently, there have been published numerous articles for and against the use of alcoholic beverages. There has been a countless number of people who have attempted to write articles about ...

    Hungarian
    I B 1, I H
  • Magyar Tribune -- August 01, 1919
    Effect of Prohibition on Society (Editorial)

    It is more than a month now since Prohibition has gone into effect in the United States.

    The passage of this law did not surprise us. We were prepared for it. We knew it would become effective soon, but little did we realize how serious its effect would really be. We always believed that wine and beer would be legally sold, therefore, the people did not care much whether whiskey was taken away or not.

    When Prohibition first became effective, many newspapers stated that the sale of wine and beer was still permissible, but later, this permission 2was denied, in accordance with the law. We feel certain that this country is to remain "bone dry."

    If we give careful thought to this mania of Prohibition, we will notice that to prohibit the sale of wine and beer means to impair the health of many people. This fact is well known as far as medical science is concerned. Of course, it does not justify the attitude of those who over-indulge.

    Other than the fact that this law is of an undemocratic nature and is depriving us of individual liberties we do not condemn it. The people who introduced the bill, and those who made it a law knew what they were doing.

    3

    It is not our aim to try to modify this law, but we will try to show the effects it will produce, and what profits society will reap thereby.

    If we look at this law from the standpoint of the workingman, then we will come to the conclusion that it might be of great financial benefit to the working classes. But only in the event that the law will be strictly enforced so that there should be absolutely no alcoholics in circulation. We know very well that only a man with clear faculties can wrestle the problems of the day, and is able to intelligently tell of his needs. If this law is carried out fully, we can only say that it will be a great help to the working class. It will realize more fully its responsibilities, and will improve the moral character of man.

    4

    We do not believe that this law will have such strength because the worker, who was a habitual drinker, does not have the will-power to stop drinking before any harm has been done, either to himself or society. He continues without limit, feeling he has a right to drink as much as he desires. This is his personal liberty and he balks at any interference.

    Therefore, from a social standpoint, we are forced to criticize Prohibition and we are fully satisfied that Prohibition will be detrimental to society.

    It is only natural that if a person is told not to do a certain thing, that person generally tries to do it, regardless of its consequences.

    We can say the same thing about the man who drinks. He does not understand 5the law. All he knows is that he wants his drink and thinks he cannot live without it, therefore, he will get it, no matter what the price is.

    As a consequence, those people who are addicted to alcohol will prepare something which will have a far worse effect on them than whisky ever had. Many people will become dope addicts, which is much worse than alcoholism. It is only natural that forbidden fruit is much sweeter. We say without any hesitation that this law may mean a degenerated society in the United States.

    It is more than a month now since Prohibition has gone into effect in the United States. The passage of this law did not surprise us. We were prepared for ...

    Hungarian
    I B 1, I H
  • Magyar Tribune -- October 31, 1919
    The Fight about Prohibition (Editorial)

    Since July 1, the whiskey glasses, wine bottles, and beer barrels have become dry. This was the result of the 18th Amendment, which went into effect just after the War. Why should we deny the fact that this was prohibition only in name and that the law has not served its purpose? There exists only a slight change brought about by this law. If one wants to drink wine, whiskey or beer, he may do so, but it must be done in secrecy. The liquor sold today is of a lower grade and the cost is much higher than previous to prohibition. To be subjected to such a condition is not exactly desirable, but who is satisfied with his present state today? We must adjust ourselves to the situation, regardless of the price we must pay for it.

    Now, the whole country is to get a terrible jolt. It was believed that the saloons would be opened so that the people might be able to 2stock up for the coming dry era. But what happened? The law which was passed to keep this country dry during the War is now going to be fully enforced at once, because Congress has just released millions of dollars to that department of government necessary for this purpose.

    We all know that after January 16, the United States will be observing prohibition, and for the next four years there will be no chance of modifying the law. There is very little we can do in the matter, so we must remain satisfied. We have only one hope: that the United States Supreme Court rules it out, saying that this law does not agree with one of the principles of the American government, that is, liberty, which is every man's right. We must not talk about this now. The law has been passed by Congress and signed by the President which means that the 18th Amendment 3will be strictly enforced within a week. Personally, we do not indulge in alcoholic beverages, nor do we advertise the sale of them, but the whole affair to us seems a laughing matter, because it ignores man's freedom. We will try to explain our ideas very briefly.

    There was probably some use for prohibition during the War, because the ingredients of alcoholic beverages were necessary to provide more food for the world. Labor used in the manufacture of liquor was necessary in other industries, and money that was being spent for alcoholic beverages was more valuable as loans to the government during the War.

    We are well aware of the fact that prohibition was originally passed as a war measure but that it became effective seven and a half 4months after the Armistice had been signed. July 1, the saloons were closed as a matter of form only, because the closing did not have any effect on the War situation at that time. Today, it is approximately a year since the War ended and it is a well known fact that due to political entanglements, peace pacts have not been signed, but the lawmakers want to spend millions of dollars on this law as a War measure in order that it might be enforced. To turn a law of this kind into a War measure during the time of peace, does not show any wisdom on the part of congress, nor will it gain the support of the people. On the contrary, the people are certain to show their disrespect for the law and it will increase the number of agitators and crime-bent organizations in this country which are two very undesirable elements to be dealt with now.

    At this time we want to warn our readers to avoid any violation of the prohibition law and as far as possible avoid places where alcoholic 5beverages are sold. This is a timely warning, because the law provides severe punishment for those who sell, buy, or manufacture, alcoholic beverages. We have also heard that some Hungarians are setting up their own stills to make their own brandies and other alcoholic concoctions. People found guilty of doing this can prepare themselves for jail sentences and heavy fines. Many illicit alcohol dealers and manufacturers have been caught already, and the time will come when every one convicted of such crimes will be imprisoned. We advise everyone to give up the unlawful practice of manufacturing alcohol. It is permissible, however to manufacture grape juice for one's own personal use. This, of course, will turn into wine later. We advise people to remain sober in order to avoid entanglements with the law and suffer the consequences.

    6

    What our personal ideas are concerning prohibition is of little concern to the law-makers. It is our duty to obey the law and to constrain others to do the same.

    Since July 1, the whiskey glasses, wine bottles, and beer barrels have become dry. This was the result of the 18th Amendment, which went into effect just after the War. ...

    Hungarian
    I B 1, II E 3, II E 2, I H, I J
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 28, 1921
    The Cave-Sleepers: John Bull and Il Duce By Von Lorthy.

    I answer, with the above heading, to the article titled "Cave-Sleepers," which appeared in last week's issue of the Tribune. Perhaps should add my own name to the above heading, because my name was mentioned also by the Tribune.

    I agree with the ideas expressed in the article, and I would like to read that you would "peel the skin from the face" of John Bull. The shameful ingratitude accorded the United States for the services in saving England from being expelled from the face of the earth by the Germans is clearly shown in an article in the issue of Herald and Examiner on January 15, page 1. This article describes how the American Mariners are murdered by the English in Cork.

    I shall not mention again how the United States "raked the chestnuts from the fire" for the English, and the attitude they assumed toward the United 2States. It is enough to say that by God's grace the American people soon enough came to their senses and left the whole "crooked business" to England who alone is worthy of it. Nevertheless, America is cautious enough, and she declares she wants to be at peace with the whole world. Still she builds the largest navy in the world, which England cannot duplicate until she pays the debt owing to the United States. Since England is so beggarly that she cannot afford to pay even the interest, we have still less hope of ever getting the capital. England cannot be taken seriously, she cannot keep pace with us in the development of armaments.

    Who would furnish her with money for that? All Europe is bankrupt, and this bankruptcy was staged by England and we must admit that she was successful, at the same time, bled us. I am certain of this, however, England will not succeed in bluffing away the large amounts of money given to her by the United States, because if she were to resort to such tactics America will give her a thrashing, and that with not over-exertion.

    3

    As to the German-Russian-Japanese alliance, it is not news to me, for I predicted it four years ago, and what the result would be. I have foretold too that England will be the first country to try to get away from the old alliance. She will join a new alliance to again be on the side of the victors. Of course, England forgets that Germany knows her cunning, hypocritical, policy, and she will not confer with her.

    If the German-Russian-Japanese alliance begins its work, I think that work will have a tendency to bring to reason the old English-French alliance, because these "running footmen" implored America, with tears, to save them, and since the people here were not very enthusiastic to stop the army of English-French alliance in their flight, certain business-interests might have forced our sons to go over whether or not to prevent the English and French army from disappearing from the earth. Thus, the great English-French victory was won. When the armistice was signed on the basis of the fourteen points of the president of the United States, everybody believed, not only the central powers, but the whole civilized 4world, was certain that these points would bring universal peace. Instead of peace, the English-French craze gained ground, the results of which are now apparent. I think the new alliance wants to replace what the Englsh-French craze spoiled.

    Although we believe that Germany would have enough reason to sulk as a result of the treatment accorded her but the Germans were wise, and they understood what happened. It was not the will of the American people that brought us into the conflict and the old friendship will return.

    I answer, with the above heading, to the article titled "Cave-Sleepers," which appeared in last week's issue of the Tribune. Perhaps should add my own name to the above heading, ...

    Hungarian
    I G, I H
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 18, 1921
    Some Results from the Change of Presidential Leadership (Editorial)

    We hear that our editorial, of last week, about the Wilson-Harding Presidential change, has become an issue of centralized interest resulting in many inquiries, and remarks. Many objected to some of the facts brought out in the article, in reference to our defense of the Wilson administration, and our criticism of Harding.

    We did not defend Wilson! We merely expressed our appreciation of the objective accomplishments made by Wilson's pen at a critical time. We advanced our confidence in Harding, but we insist on our privilege to 2criticize, because we are not going to blindly agree to all the Republicans' actions. We want our readers to see what the entire political change means, and why the American political situation is an eye-sore. Those politicians who sought positions and are now job olders have a livelihood, while we poor workers can expect no exceptional economic change.

    If there is work, then we will work, if not, then we starve, whether Harding or anyone else sits in the White House. Harding will bring neither work nor good wages. The domination of the capitalists, over both political parties, is the cause behind the depression.

    The political change is more or less only a change in names. For those who still are doubtful of our opinions and maintain and believe, that under 3Harding's leadership some radical changes for the better in our political life will result, we are at your service and will review some of the great changes brought about by Harding.

    Look at some of the construction changes. From Harding's first actions and steps we can already see a great change. His first action was to name his life-long friend and family physician, to be the Chief U. S. medical officer with a mere $6,000 salary and other considerations, which boost his income to the $10,000 mark.

    Therefore, the small town doctor from Marion, Ohio, becomes a Brigadier General, but not because there is a great need for a house physician in the White House.

    4

    Dr. Sawyer himself said, he had never taken care of Harding, because he is very healthy and was never seriously ill.

    What is the value of a friendship, if a man does not prove its value with good deeds? So, President Harding set a precedent by putting his old friend on the taxpayers' necks, without serving any good purpose.

    This is truly a change. Wilson did not do such things. That is an old Republican custom. Was this change worth voting for? Let us go on. From Marion, Ohio, Harding called to Washington another good old neighbor, a very wealthy friend, Crissinger by name. Hurriedly he named him to a very fat position, Treasurer of the United States. This position pays 5only a very meager salary of $10,000 a year, but what is that between brothers? Well, Harding will not become lonely in Washington because of the great change. Dr. Sawyer and Mr. Crissinger, his bosom friends, will be there to ease the pains of homesickness.

    This is the way he is introducing the great change. Harding named Farrell to the Shipping Board, where he will handle billions of dollars worth of important transactions. Farrell is the president of the Steel trust. This is another great change, the great result of our vote.

    We see that Harding is very choosey with his appointments. He is always appointing those whom he favors most, whether it be the president of the Steel trust or a friendly neighbor. By this, without any doubt, he is 6outdoing Wilson tremendously, and truly we will agree that the election of Harding means a change. Not only do we feel the results of the change from the appointments, but also the change of foreign and political principles are felt. President Harding also created this change.

    Let us not forget, that during the election campaigns, from Harding down to the last grafting politician, they preached to the people, that when they come into power, among other things, they would create a new order in foreign policies. Let us see in what way have they changed their policies from those of the terrible days of Wilson.

    Harding asked the Senators to allow the treaty made with Columbia to stand.

    7

    This is the treaty which was bitterly opposed by the Republican Senators for over two years, while Wilson was President. Our readers can be assured that the Republican Senators and Harding are now doing this in behalf of the great change, though, in the first place, Wilson asked this of them.

    The new Secretary of State, strange to relate, has accepted without change, Wilson's pacts regarding the Japs and Mesopotamia. For the time being, Harding is quietly watching and waiting the Mexican situation, again following Wilson's course. Here Harding forgot to make a change. We believe, this great change, is rather a change in people only, and we will find some new gentlemen, strange faces, and hungry politicians around the meat pot. The old order will remain the same.

    8

    For all of that, we are not angry at Mr. Harding. He cannot do anything more clever than to forget his party's election promises and platform. This sudden loss of memory is an asset that is understood by all politicians. Why bother making changes here or there, let it remain as it is, even in Foreign affairs.

    This is the great change, that we can expect from Harding--an attitude of indifference, that is all.

    We hear that our editorial, of last week, about the Wilson-Harding Presidential change, has become an issue of centralized interest resulting in many inquiries, and remarks. Many objected to some ...

    Hungarian
    I F 5, I D 1 a, I F 6, I C, I H