The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Magyar Tribune -- March 08, 1917
    Hungarian American Women.

    We Hungarian Americans owe certain duties to the United States government regardless of whether we be men or women. Men or women, the United States takes care of us, whether in time of peace or war. The United States does not regard the men or women as enemies of this country. From this point of view we think it necessary that the Hungarian American women take part in patriotic movements in this country.

    One way that the Hungarian American women can show their colors is by joining the Loyalty League. By joining the league you can show your appreciation and good patriotism for the protection and equality granted you during this war.

    The Hungarian American women must think of the fact that their husbands have been given the opportunities to earn their own daily bread and amply provide for their families.

    The Hungarian American women must think of the fact that the Loyalty 2League is here to protect your husband and his family.

    The Hungarian American women must bear in mind the fact that this country is such a wonderful place to live in and the opportunities that it offers.

    After thinking all these things over it is very apparent that it is the duty of the Hungarian American woman to join, and become a faithful member of the Loyalty League.

    It is only natural that women would think about their homeland and wonder what is happening there, and in their own little communities from which they came to this country. By joining the league the Hungarian women can show the government and make them realize that the Hungarian population of America is doing its duty very patriotically. Perhaps by realizing this the government will open the channels for mail between this country and Hungary.

    Every Hungarian American woman should step into the Hungarian American Loyalty 3League. She owes this to herself and to her family and thereby lives up to the standards of good partiotism towards the United States government.

    We Hungarian Americans owe certain duties to the United States government regardless of whether we be men or women. Men or women, the United States takes care of us, whether ...

    Hungarian
    I K, I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 23, 1917
    The Emigration Problem

    Previous to the war which has been going on for the past three years, many of us who never thought that we would go back to Hungary,are now thinking seriously of emigrating with the thought that after the war there will be a shortage of man power due to the great number that lost their lives or became cripples.

    There is some question as to whether the supposition is true. Does it seem probable that the Hungarians emigrating from this country, will be respected as good workers, and can they expect a livable wage for their work? Why did we come to this country? Was it not because there were too many of us in Hungary and we could not make a living there?

    As we learned in school, the natural resources of Hungary are silver, iron ore, and coal and easy transportation by water. Our immigration to this country was therefore not caused by Hungary's not having sufficient natural resources. The 2real reason seems to be political and lack of general wealth among the people, also lack of general and technical education. On account of these facts many of the people became surplus population in their particular line of work,and if a man did get a job he was 'pushed around' and constantly reminded, that if he did not like his job there were many others who would like it. Most particularly was this true of the agricultural worker. Most of them worked long hours for very low wages. Hungary is an agricultural country and most of its farm implements are manufactured in foreign countries; therefore industry absorbs very few or none of the employables.

    About the only place where industry and mining thrive and develop is in the agricultural regions where the owners can obtain cheap and ignorant help. This situation brings about a wandering class of workers. This type of workers has a tendency to retard the development of both agriculture and industry. We would think that the working class of people are at fault, but there is also a certain percentage of professional men involved; they cannot find work due to the fact that in Hungary the industries are so far behind in development. Such was the picture before the war started.

    3

    Even then the workers were beginning to realize that organization was necessary. They wanted shorter hours and more pay. But the Capitalists realized the ignorance of the people and created internal strife among them, so that these organizations were soon broken up.

    But now the war is nearing its end, and the people are fast realizing that they were not fighting and killing to save their own, but to save the property of those who had treated them so harshly. In Hungary the great land owners are the law makers and legislators. The people who fought for them must realize these facts, and they must demand their rights.

    The development of Hungary depends on the question of whether or not the people who fought in the war will have any rights. If the government provides regulations for livable wages for the agricultural workers, free press, and free and independent courts for the people, then perhaps the Hungarians in America might feel that it would be worth their while to go back to Hungary after the war is over.

    Previous to the war which has been going on for the past three years, many of us who never thought that we would go back to Hungary,are now thinking seriously ...

    Hungarian
    III G, I G, III H
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 23, 1917
    Theatrical Play Given for the Aid of War Cripples

    On March 27, The South Side Good Will Society will present a very beautiful and interesting play at the Pythian Temple located at 9231 Cottage Grove Avenue. The profits from this performance will be used for the relief of those crippled in the war.

    On March 27, The South Side Good Will Society will present a very beautiful and interesting play at the Pythian Temple located at 9231 Cottage Grove Avenue. The profits from ...

    Hungarian
    II B 1 c 1, I G, II D 10
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 30, 1917
    Safety of Foreign Wealth (Editorial)

    A decision is up before the congress of the United States with regards to entering the war. This decision is giving the German people of this country considerable worry and this situation has also caused the Hungarian people to be worried to some extent. Since this country broke relationship with Germany, the German people in a couple of cities in the United States have become worried, and have taken all their savings out of the bank.

    Therefore the President of the United States has seen fit to make an announcement, that even if this country does go to war with a foreign power, the wealth of foreigners in this country will be safe.

    The President of the United States has learned that there has been a rumor among the foreign population of the United States that if war breaks out with any 2particular nation, the people of that nation living in this country will have their property and savings in the banks confiscated by the government. Therefore the President has authorized the Secretary of State to make an announcement that these rumors are false and that there is no cause for the people to worry.

    The government of the United States under no circumstances will use the war situation as a reason for confiscating wealth in this country. The government will protect foreign property in this country just as it will protect the property of the citizens of this country.

    This means that property and bank savings of Hungarians living in the United States are and will be just as safe in time of war as they were in time of peace.

    This announcement will cause a better feeling towards the government by both the citizens of this country and non citizens.

    3

    We ask that you do not listen to anyone, who is spreading fear and dissatisfaction. No one should rush the banks or leave his present place of employment.

    No one should get excited over the present situation and everyone must feel that the situation will be cleared up to the satisfaction of everyone.

    A decision is up before the congress of the United States with regards to entering the war. This decision is giving the German people of this country considerable worry and ...

    Hungarian
    I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- March 30, 1917
    Masses Acquire Citizenship

    Since the first of February when the United States broke its diplomatic relationship with Germany, there has been a noticeable increase in the number of people who desire to become American citizens. In one and a half months time there were 10,914 first papers issued, and at the same time there were 1,952 second papers issued and thereby creating as many new citizens. Of the new citizens that were naturalized 80 per cent were Germans, Hungarians and Austrians.

    In the entire year of 1916 there were 13,766 first papers, and 7, 870 second papers issued.

    Since the first of February when the United States broke its diplomatic relationship with Germany, there has been a noticeable increase in the number of people who desire to become ...

    Hungarian
    III A, I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 06, 1917
    Warning

    We do hereby urge those Hungarians who are not citizens of the United States, to adhere strictly to laws of the United States.

    Every Hungarian citizen should guard against critizing Congress and the President of the United States in regard to their action on the war situation. Free speech is not the privilege of those who are only guests of this country.

    The only ones that have a right to criticize the acts of the President and Congress are the people of the United States who are citizens of the United States.

    To those of us who are only guests of the United States, the war between the allies and Germany is of no concern. We should keep to our usual business and avoid dissention among our fellow-workers with reference to the war question.

    We do hereby urge those Hungarians who are not citizens of the United States, to adhere strictly to laws of the United States. Every Hungarian citizen should guard against critizing ...

    Hungarian
    I G, I J
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 14, 1917
    Lectures in Chicago.

    The Hungarian College Club, representing the highest classes of Hungarians in Chicago, has a very exclusive membership, for it requires, of members joining, a college diploma.

    This organization passed a resolution at its last meeting to give instructions and advice to Hungarians, by means of lectures and readings, with reference to behavior in times of war. Thus they are trying to maintain that splendid reputation which the Hungarians have established in peace times among the American people. They are teaching Hungarians, who have become citizens, how to conduct themselves in reference to the war. Instructions will be given to those who wish to secure their naturalization papers, and also to those who have not as yet obtained their first papers. The latter will be taught what is expected of them, while the United States is at war.

    Likewise will advice be given to those who have surplus funds to invest, showing them how to place investments here, while such are barred in foreign countries.

    2

    The first lecture took place last Tuesday at Burnside; the next will be held in West Pullman. These lectures, apparently, meet with the approval of the Hungarians, because quite a number attended the last one.

    The Hungarian College Club, representing the highest classes of Hungarians in Chicago, has a very exclusive membership, for it requires, of members joining, a college diploma. This organization passed a ...

    Hungarian
    II B 2 g, I G, I A 3, III A, II B 1 d
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 21, 1917
    The Ten Commandments for Immigrants in Time of War (Editorial)

    I

    You must never forget that no one asked you to come to the United States. You came here of your own free will to make a better living and to save a few nickels for your old age.

    II

    When you stepped on the shore of the United States you were on free soil. No one asked you what you were doing here, and no one stood in your way. It was up to you and you only what you were going to do in this country. The nation immediately became your friend. You received the respect due to a guest when you entered the United States. Respect your host, and your host will respect you.

    2

    III

    Keep your thoughts to yourself. Maybe the pope knows everything, but you are not a pope, and this does not mean that you know more than he does.

    IV

    Do not get involved in any arguments in public places.

    V

    For six days do your work and attend to your duties. On the seventh day rest; that is what the Lord intended you to do. Six days out of the week are for labor, and during this time you should think of nothing but your duties. If you are engaged in respectable work, you will be considered a law-abiding citizen, so work for six days, and on the seventh day of the week devote your time to rest and to your family.

    3

    VI

    Do not take part in any political movement. Trust the people whose duty it is to think for you. Be satisfied, for you will not be able to change things anyway. In war unity means strength.

    VII

    Have respect for the laws of the country which provides your daily bread. The laws defend your interests. Every law has a purpose. You must be familiar with the laws, and you must obey them.

    VIII

    Do not carry on your person any kind of firearm or other deadly weapon. Your only weapon of defense should be your self-respect.

    4

    IX

    Keep your savings in the same place in which you had them in time of peace. Money should be kept in a bank and not on one's person or at the place where one lives. You yourself cannot guard your money so well as the bank can. The laws of this country insure that what is yours is yours only. Regardless of what the future may bring, your wealth will not be threatened by disaster in the United States.

    X

    Love your neighbor. All men are equal regardless of creed and nationality. We all came from the same parentage originally, and we are all brothers and sisters. After the World War will come brotherly love among the nations of the world. It is for this purpose that this country is fighting. No one asks you for sacrifice in this war; therefore you can lead a life of peace and happiness if you keep to the straight and narrow path.

    I You must never forget that no one asked you to come to the United States. You came here of your own free will to make a better living and ...

    Hungarian
    I G, III A
  • Magyar Tribune -- May 31, 1917
    Registration (Editorial)

    June 5th will long be remembered by every man in the United States. On this day the first call will go out for all men to register in order that the United States army officials may pick suitable men for duty overseas. The registration takes in every man regardless of whether he is a citizen of this country or not. At present, it is required that every man who has reached his 21st birthday, but has not reached his 31st should register for examination by the Army. It is the duty of every American citizen to protect his country. Only American citizens are being drafted into the Army, but every man regardless of citizenship will be required to register.

    The registration will take place at the polling places of the different precincts. There will be no excuses for not registering. Even those who are ill must register; there will be special provisions made for them.

    2

    The Hungarian-Americans have always fulfilled all requirements of good citizenship. It does not seem necessary to warn the Hungarian citizens in this country of the importance of registering, because they all know that laws in this country are not considered as a joking matter. Now we must consider the Hungarians who are not citizens of the United States. They must register also, although they are not required to serve in the Army.

    It is very important that no Hungarian should consider this matter of registration lightly. No one should think that if they postpone their registration, the government will not catch up with them. When the offenders are caught no excuses will be accepted whether a man is a citizen of this country or not. The penalty for the offense of not registering is one year in jail, and this penalty can not be escaped by the payment of a fine.

    June the fifth should be kept in mind by all Hungarians and if any of them have any doubt as to the date let him find out about it.

    3

    A reprint of the registration law has been mailed to all recognized newspapers in the country with the request that the editors familiarize their readers with this law. We of the Magyar Tribune stand ready to serve our readers and friends at all times. We will give you our fullest co-operation and our best advice in this matter.

    June 5th will long be remembered by every man in the United States. On this day the first call will go out for all men to register in order that ...

    Hungarian
    I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- June 29, 1917
    Bread, Whiskey and Beer (Editorial)

    Recently there were two very important news items revealed to the public. One of these came from Washington, D.C., stating that the House of Representatives had passed a resolution in regard to food regulation in this country. This regulation prohibits the use of barley or rye for the manufacture of liquor. The other news item comes from England with reference to their barley and rye crop being insufficient to amply supply the breweries. Since the law prohibiting the manufacture of alcoholic liquors will be enacted, it will make the country dry during the war. This law is not being brought about because this country's crop is insufficient to supply the needs of the nation, but it is because of our alliance in war with other nations. This makes it our duty to provide food to people living in those countries, especially England. So the government of this country needs to divide the crops in such manner that we will retain a certain amount, the rest to be divided among the allies. It seems as though the law enacted by Congress is for this purpose, but looks are 2deceiving. The truth of the matter is that politics are playing its part. The Temperance League is going to make use of the situation, thereby making this move look like a patriotic move, but at the same time taking a great step towards their objective for which they have been working for some time.

    The English news item makes the resolution enacted by the House of Representative of the United States a laughable matter. The law prohibited the manufacture of alcholic liquors in the United States so England will be supplied with material to manufacture alcoholic beverages. In England beer or ale is considered one of the necessities of life for a worker. In the United States the law makers are not far-sighted enough to see this. In the name of the people of the United States they give up the manufacture of alcoholic beverages, in order that the Engligh people be supplied with plenty of it.

    Practically all the nations involved in the war have made restrictions with reference to the use of alcohol, but none of them have closed their breweries or wineries. The German people who have felt the effects of the war more than any nation can still drink beer and their beer is manufactured from barley just as ours was.

    3

    If the United States thinks that it is absolutely necessary to prohibit the use of barley by the manufacturers,we cannot speak against it. But this necessity can only come when and if the nations that consume our barley quit manufacturing beer out of it. England should be the first nation to do this. But if the English find that beer is a necessity, then it must be a necessity in the United States also.

    Recently there were two very important news items revealed to the public. One of these came from Washington, D.C., stating that the House of Representatives had passed a resolution in ...

    Hungarian
    I B 1, I G, I H