The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 25, 1892
    Greeks in Chicago in 1890

    (According to Secretary Stones' statistics of the different nationalities in Chicago, which he published in 1891, and which he based on the census of 1890, there were 698 Greeks living in Chicago at that time.)

    (According to Secretary Stones' statistics of the different nationalities in Chicago, which he published in 1891, and which he based on the census of 1890, there were 698 Greeks living ...

    Greek
    III G
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 10, 1901
    Angry Greeks Attack Fellow-Countrymen Police Rescue Four from Crowds at 247 West Polk Street and Lock Them Up, Charged with False Pretenses

    The police last night rescued four Greeks from an angry crowd of their fellow-countrymen who were threatening them with violence. The disturbance arose at 247 West Polk Street, where the crowd was besieging John, Theodore, and James Patadopoulos and Theodore's MaLearas. Riot calls were sent in to the Maxwell and Desplaines Street Stations. Two patrol wagons full of policemen were soon on the scene and they succeeded in controlling the people. The Greeks say that the four men gave it out they were representatives of the Union Pacific Railway Company and offered to pay $1.75 a day for laborers in the West. The Greeks then paid $10 each for railroad fare. $3,000 in all, they say, and were demanding the money back.

    The four men were locked up in the Maxwell Street Police Station, charged with obtaining money under false pretenses. Lieutenant Ambrose, who assisted in arresting the men said:

    2

    "If the police had not arrived when they did Patadopoulo and MaLearas would certainly have been killed by the angry crowd.

    The police last night rescued four Greeks from an angry crowd of their fellow-countrymen who were threatening them with violence. The disturbance arose at 247 West Polk Street, where the ...

    Greek
    II E 1
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 15, 1901
    Kiss Away Their Past Sins. Unique Feature of the Easter Celebration by the Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity.

    P. 20 Greeks from stores and fruit stands, Russians from the sweat shops and factories, swarthy Syrians and even Arabians crowded the Greek Orthodox Church of Holy Trinity, 34 Johnson Street, yesterday to observe the Easter services of their church. Six thousand turned out in holiday attire and spent the day, from midnight until midnight, in feasting, festivities and worship. Bananas, sweat shops and peddling were forgotten, for it was the one great religious celebration of the year.

    During the last week services similar to those of the Roman Catholic Church during holy week were observed, but they culminated at midnight on Saturday, when the mass which ushers in Easter was celebrated. Promptly at midnight Dorotheos Vacaliaros, the archimandrite, or priest, of the Holy Trinity Church, arrayed in all the glory of a Jewish Levite, appeared at the vestry entrance of the church. Large chandeliers, each carrying hundreds of pure honeycomb wax tapers, were lighted, and lamps, with pure olive oil from Palestine, added to the brilliancy of the scene. Into this burst of light the priest stepped, with 2with bowed head, and as he passed under a picture of the Virgin Mother he tipped a banner, depicting the resurrection, which he carried.

    He was followed by two assistants, who carried Greek and American flags, for the Greeks worship for both nations. They passed around the church, through long aisles made in the dense crowd that filled the auditorium, which never has known a seat. When they had passed around they then entered the altar space between two chairs of twenty-four voices, which intoned a portion of the liturgy. When the priest had reached thd altar he took from it a large pure wax candle, lit it from one of the lamps and then intoned: -

    "Come and take your light from everlasting light, and worship Christ arising from the dead."

    Stepping to the chairs, he then lit the candle of the man nearest the altar, who passed his light to the one next, and thus around the church, for all who worshipped bore candles, which they obtained at the door as they entered. The church, already bright with thousands of flames, became a mass of lights, and the worshippers chanted:-

    3

    "Christ is rising from the dead and stepping over the dead and giving the ones in the grave everlasting hope."

    This intonation was the signal for the setting of fireworks in the streets surrounding the church. Skyrockets, Roman candles and firecrackers were used as symbols of glory for all believers of the Orthodox religion. Inside the church, the service continued with the liturgy and the sprinkling of holy water on the congregation and the reading of the resurrection, in the Greek, Russian, Syrian and Arabic languages.

    When this was done, and the priest had so commanded all true believers in the orthodox faith, he turned to those near him and kissed them, thus signifying that all past sins were forgiven and forgotten. It was the closing feature of the strange service and was participated in by the people with all the enthusiasm of the southern races.

    The exercises were over at 1:30 A:M and until 2 P:M the bands of worshippers made merry in their homes, where whole lambs and sheep were broiled and elaborate feasts spread. At 2 P:M the same service was performed and again the church was crowded, contributions were taken at the doors, for which candles were given out.

    4

    At the midnight service $900 was taken and in the afternoon $700.

    The services were observed yesterday because the Greeks use the Julian calendar under which yesterday was April. Their Easter falls between March 21 and April 18, being the first Sunday when there is a full moon. Should the day fall on the Hebrew Easter the Greeks postpone it until the following week.

    P. 20 Greeks from stores and fruit stands, Russians from the sweat shops and factories, swarthy Syrians and even Arabians crowded the Greek Orthodox Church of Holy Trinity, 34 Johnson ...

    Greek
    I B 4, IV, III C
  • Greek Star -- January 28, 1904
    The Greek Newspaper, the Sta (Summary)

    p. 3- With great joy, the Greeks of Chicago and in near-by States will greet the Star, a weekly Greek newspaper of Chicago, which begins publication to-day, Jan. 28th, 1904.

    The aim of this publication is to promote in particular the best interests of the Chicago Greek community and in general the interests of Greeks in all places reached by it. The publishers of this weekly, which is independent, will with all their might try to maintain the paper as an impartial servant of the masses, unaffected by any outside influence, whether political, religious, or commercial, and they will strive to keep the Star's horizon absolutely cloudless.

    The publishers are Messrs. Panagiotis S. Lambros, Demetrius Manousopoulos, and Demetrios S. Eutaxias.

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    The gentlemen named above are known among Greeks for their honesty, integrity, broad-mindedness, and sterling character; and they are resolved to do everything in their power to make the Chicago Greek community the Star of all communities, not only in America but in all the world.

    The Star, in New York, will be sold at 10 Madison Street, in Philadelphia at 725 Cherry Street, in Boston at 162 Richmond Street, and in St. Louis at 823 Walnut Street.

    p. 3- With great joy, the Greeks of Chicago and in near-by States will greet the Star, a weekly Greek newspaper of Chicago, which begins publication to-day, Jan. 28th, 1904. ...

    Greek
    II B 2 d 1, IV
  • Greek Star -- January 29, 1904
    The Greek Star (Editorial)

    The Greeks of Chicago and the surrounding states will be happy to greet this first issue of The Greek Star. The purpose of this paper is to protect the fundamental human and civic rights of every individual in our Greek Community of Chicago as well as throughout the United States.

    The Greek Community of Chicago was one of the first Greek communities in America. It has been the first to champion every patriotic cause. But, it should not make any boasts because of this. On the contrary, it should endeavor, together with the Greek communities in every state, to become the proud and worthy apostle of our fatherland, Greece, among the Greeks of the United States. The Greek Community of Chicago must endeavor to develop and mold the mind and character of the younger Greek generation in America in accordance with our Greek ideals and standards. It must revive our national 2hope and quicken the hearts of all the Greek people, for, as time passes, they are inclined to forget their fatherland and all that it stands for.

    In order to accomplish all these high objectives, there is need, not only for clubs and organizations with their attendant resolutions and programs, but also a proper news organ is desirable, which will become the teacher and guardian of our Community's interests. In other words, there is a pressing need in Chicago for a newspaper which must be independent, dignified, national in scope, and imbued with highest ideals and sound policies. It must be able to assist the Community in its work and with its problems. In return, our Greek people must appreciate and respect this organ for its work and significance.

    By aligning itself with the Community, our newspaper will pursue and seek the best and highest objectives and ideals. It will endeavor to do everything that the great heritage and culture of our fathers and ancestors impose upon us. It will not spare any time or effort to exert all its powers to work 3willingly and impartially to prevent and correct every evil and every harmful thought or action. This newspaper will be merciless in its criticism and condemnation of anyone who would try or think of disturbing the peace and harmony within our community.

    We, the editors and publishers of The Greek Star, are independent in our policy and convictions. We will not be influenced by any group or vested interest. We shall endeavor to show the public that in its entire course and career The Greek Star will not be shadowed and obscured by anyone or anything.

    For these very reasons it solicits the moral and financial support of our fellow countrymen in this great American metropolis.

    Henceforth, this newspaper will guard and defend the vital interests of all of our people who are living and earning a livelihood within the framework of a great, rich, hospitable, and friendly country; such is the United States of America.

    4

    We owe it to ourselves; we owe it to Greece; we owe it to our adopted country, these United States of America, to do our very best in obeying and upholding the principles of democracy, justice, truth, law, and order.

    As a supplement to this, our first editorial, we wish to inform our readers that Messrs. Peter S. Lambros, James Manousopoulos, and James S. Eutaxias are the directors, owners, and editors of The Greek Star.

    The Greeks of Chicago and the surrounding states will be happy to greet this first issue of The Greek Star. The purpose of this paper is to protect the fundamental ...

    Greek
    II B 2 d 1, IV, III A
  • Greek Star -- February 05, 1904
    [Appeal for the Macedonian Relief Committee]

    May we call to the attention of the Greek people of Chicago the new appeal of the Macedonian Relief Committee? The purpose of this committee is to collect funds and supplies for the victims and sufferers in Macedonia, Greece.

    The presidents and responsible leaders of our organizations, clubs, and church parishes in Chicago and in all other communities in the United States are urged to do their part, and to undertake the patriotic action of organizing local committees for the collection of relief funds. It is the duty of all true Greeks, whose hearts are inspired by altruistic sentiments and sympathy for our suffering brothers in Greece, to show that we have not forgotten our fatherland and that we are thinking of it in its difficulties and trials.

    The Star, an active supporter of this drive for relief funds, recommends that all the church committees, especially those whose task it is to care for the poor, undertake to collect maoney by passing an extra collection basket on 2Sundays and on every important feast day or holiday. This money will be used to provide food, clothing, shelter, and medical treatment for the unfortunate Greeks of Macedonia.

    May we call to the attention of the Greek people of Chicago the new appeal of the Macedonian Relief Committee? The purpose of this committee is to collect funds and ...

    Greek
    II D 10, III H
  • Greek Star -- February 05, 1904
    Greek News of Chicago

    We are calling the attention of the Greek community to the recently organized Committee for Macedonian Aid whose purpose is to help the suffering and destitute Greeks of Krousobos. We beg the presidents of all the Greek societies and clubs to do their national duty as they see fit and as their Greek training and patriotic ideals have taught them. The Star will gladly accept any donations or contributions and suggests that a special collection be taken up in all the Greek Orthodox churches of the United States during the Sunday services and during all special masses for this noble and humanitarian cause.

    We are calling the attention of the Greek community to the recently organized Committee for Macedonian Aid whose purpose is to help the suffering and destitute Greeks of Krousobos. We ...

    Greek
    II D 10, III H, III C
  • Greek Star -- February 12, 1904
    The Greeks in Chicago

    At a recent meeting of the splendid Greek Panhellenic Club of Chicago, it was decided that the members discontinue paying the monthly dues of twenty-five cents, which were to go into the treasury of a certain Greek company known as the "Hellenism Company". As a result, Mr. S. Georgiadis, the president of the club, has resigned his position because he did not approve of this action. Many of the members appealed to Mr. Georgiadis to withdraw his resignation, but their request was not heeded. So, the members of the club will have to elect a new chairman very soon.

    It is well known that Mr. Georgiadis was the founder of the Greek Panhellenic Club, as well as its first president. He has done outstanding work in formulating the club's objectives and in furthering the general welfare of the members.

    At a recent meeting of the splendid Greek Panhellenic Club of Chicago, it was decided that the members discontinue paying the monthly dues of twenty-five cents, which were to go ...

    Greek
    III B 2
  • Greek Star -- February 12, 1904
    The Greeks of Chicago

    We request all those who have been receiving The Star to send us their subscriptions. We are forced to repeat this request because we are planning to increase the size and number of our issues.

    Our friends and subscribers realize that the publication of a newspaper, which is nation-wide in scope and which has undertaken the task of keeping thousands of Greeks not only in Chicago but throughout the United States informed about developments in Greece and the life of the Greeks in America, demands a considerable expenditure and much effort.

    We hope that our people in Chicago will appreciate the importance of the work which is done by this newspaper and that they will support us financially.

    We request all those who have been receiving The Star to send us their subscriptions. We are forced to repeat this request because we are planning to increase the size ...

    Greek
    II B 2 d 1
  • Greek Star -- March 04, 1904
    The Newly Elected Officers of the Greek Community in Chicago

    p. 2- The very much disputed administration of the Greek Community in Chicago is a thing of the past since the official election of last Sunday.

    As Judge Brentano had ordered, the rival factions filed affidavits of their candidacy, and the elections took place under the auspices of a mixed committee, Greek and American, appointed by the Court.

    The newly-elected officials who will administer the affairs of the community are as follows:

    Dr. Gregory Papaeliou, president; St. Spyrakis, vice-president; Chr. Ladas, treasurer; Dem. Papantoniou, secretary. The members of the Council are B. Georgacopoulos, Geo. Koteopoulos, Dem. Karambelas, B. Petropoulos, Athanasius Munjuris, Kyriakos Demas, Geo. Tsikhias, Const. Stavrakos, Dem. Chiambas, Philip Kekos, and Nicholas Kokinis.

    2

    The management of the Star wishes success to the newly-elected officials and hopes that the prestige of the community will be safeguarded and enhanced.

    p. 2- The very much disputed administration of the Greek Community in Chicago is a thing of the past since the official election of last Sunday. As Judge Brentano had ...

    Greek
    III C, IV