The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 23, 1872
    [Political Matters]

    At the place of Emil Dietzsch, East Randolph Street, a meeting was held yesterday, in order to elect delegates for the Reunion and Reform Convention at Cincinnati. (Attendance being extremely small, a discussion ensued if the meeting should elect delegates).

    Mr. Ruhbaum:

    I am not surprised that so few are present, today, because the call was not published in the Illinois Staats Zeitung, and so naturally only a very small part of the Chicago Germans were informed of the meeting. But time is short and the delegates should be elected, today, and from among those present.

    2

    Mr. Emil Dietzsch:

    I hardly know an intelligent German who is not in sympathy with us. But it is undeniable that at present a certain lethargy prevails among the Chicago Germans. The absence of many therefore should not be construed as disagreement. (In exact count of those present at that time, waiters and reporters of six papers included netted the impressive number of twenty-eight).

    After a protracted discussion a motion was carried to hold a mass meeting, Thursday, in the Turn Hall, - after Hermann Lieb had pledged himself to get the necessary funds from his American friends. In expectation that the mass meeting would be largely American the twenty-eight present elected ten German delegates without loss of time.

    At the place of Emil Dietzsch, East Randolph Street, a meeting was held yesterday, in order to elect delegates for the Reunion and Reform Convention at Cincinnati. (Attendance being extremely ...

    German
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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 21, 1873
    Encouragement for the Chicago German Movement.

    The union of the Germans of Chicago in order to fight Puritanism and nativism attracts widespread attention. Especially great is the sympathy in Indiana where the Germans have the same fight on their hands. The Indianapolis Daily Telegraph has this to say: "The increasing rottenness in our public affairs, the guardianship imposed on the Germans, is not felt any deeper in Chicago than it is here. The union of all the Germans irrespective of their political views fills with the highest hope." The Michigan Journal says: "Since it is possible that the free minded citizens of all the states will eventually unite against the fanatics and Puritans, it is important to watch closely the Chicago movement." The Louisville Informer says: "This policy of union is practical and sensible. It is this policy which has given the fanatics victory, although they are in the minority." The Cincinnati Courier says: "The fight of the Germans of Chicago assumes constantly greater proportions. The Germans of all the United States are watching with the greatest interest the result of this strange fight."

    The union of the Germans of Chicago in order to fight Puritanism and nativism attracts widespread attention. Especially great is the sympathy in Indiana where the Germans have the same ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 2, I B 2, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 31, 1873
    The German American Central Association of Chicago.

    Under this name has been created by the delegates of the German War organizations and German associations a German central organization for Chicago. This is the first unifying accomplishment since the beginning of the war against the Puritans.

    The agitation and platform committees created by the German Central Association are composed of such men that one may expect a speedy solution of the most important matters. The most important matter for the moment is the making up of a liberal platform on which all the adversaries of Puritanism can agree.

    Under this name has been created by the delegates of the German War organizations and German associations a German central organization for Chicago. This is the first unifying accomplishment since ...

    German
    I F 2, I B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 26, 1873
    The German-American Central Association.

    Mr. Rosenthal, as President of the Agitation Committee, had Philip Stein read to the assembly the platform worked out by the committee.

    The Platform.

    Resolved: The Civil Service of the Federal, State, and local governments has become a mere instrument of party tyranny. We consider a reform of the Civil Service as a matter of great importance.

    Resolved: That the actual conditions of public finances make it imperative to administer the city and county expenditures in the most economical manner.

    Resolved: That the education of youth is the most effective means to prevent crime and that the erection of a sufficient number of schools is one of the most urgent needs of the city.

    Resolved: That we consider it to be in opposition to our institutions to arrest some one for a misdemeanor punishable by a fine. In such a case a summons satisfies 2every just and legal purpose. All laws and ordinances to the contrary should be abolished.

    Resolved: That neither the State, County, nor City police has the right to impose on one part of the population the views of another part of the population, as to how to attain happiness in this life and in the hereafter.

    In consideration of present conditions we agree, that on Sundays business places and amusements should be so limited as not to interfere with religious services, but we deny one part of the population the right to dictate to the other part of the population about how to celebrate Sunday.

    Resolved: That temperance is to be recommended and intemperance to be opposed. We suggest the planting of vineyards and the reduction of taxes on wine and beer. All publicly sold beverages should be inspected, and if adulterated should be confiscated and their owner punished.

    Resolved: That we recommend an ordinance, which would forbid the granting of a license for saloons, loan places and fruit stands to persons of ill repute.

    3

    Resolved: That we consider as a basic principle, that each one can be responsible only for his own actions. We recommend the repeal of the legislation, which makes the owner responsible for the actions of a tenant who has rented the place for honest purposes.

    Resolved: That we recommend these resolutions to each and every citizen. We invite every one to join this movement, so that we may regain our fundamental rights and liberties as citizens.

    The platform upon recommendation of Mr. Nickoff was accepted unanimously.

    General Lieb announced that 9,000 copies of the Liberal American are waiting to reproduce the platform.

    Mr. Rosenthal, as President of the Agitation Committee, had Philip Stein read to the assembly the platform worked out by the committee. The Platform. Resolved: The Civil Service of the ...

    German
    I F 3, I B 2, I F 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 21, 1873
    New Allies

    Last Friday a meeting of forty gentlemen of the Independent Citizens took place at the Pacific Hotel. They appointed a committee which last Saturday made the nominations, and in consequence of these nominations several members left the convention.

    Yesterday afternoon a meeting took place in which the committee was supposed to make its report. Present were Edmund Jussen, Richard F. Banmann, Seeberger, Jae, Beiersdorf, (G. Schneider, Louis Wahl, L. J Kadisch, and Jos. Huhn were represented by other Germans), T. A. Horan, O. C. Bonfield, fol. Rickerby, H. O. Collins, George R. Hall, George D. Barrett,R. Kelsey Reed, W. Allstrom, B. Callaghan.

    C. C. Bonfield was elected chairman. Edmund Jussen said in his speeck: "In the absence of the chairman of the committee, I take the liberty to make the report. As a German American I must protest against the proceeding of the committee. They have dared to do at this convention, what has never been attempted in any organized community in which Germans were living. Not only have the Germans been 2completely ignored in the nominations, but the office promised them has been given to their most rabid enemy. To make matters worse, to soften our resentment, the office of city attorney is given to the Germans by a later nomination. It is an insult, if you believe you can thus win us.

    "I consider it a tragedy that the election will be fought according to nationalities; but since it must be so, better now than later.

    It is my opinion that if the liberal Americans and the liberal Irish join the Hesing - O'Hara party, we can then expect a tremendous victory." Col. Rickerby said, that in his opinion the Germans had been treated shabbily, that he would not support a ticket which excludes any nationality. A. T. Moran said, that Jussen complained about the treatment given the Germans. He could make the same complaint in regard to the Irish. How did they go about the splitting of the Hesing O'Hara party? By throwing out all the Germans and Irish. It is true two Irishmen were nominated but they are Republicans and cannot thus represent the Irish who are mostly Democrats.

    Mr. Callahan endorses the protest, so do Mr. Bonfield and Collins.

    3

    The meeting is adjourned.

    Last Friday a meeting of forty gentlemen of the Independent Citizens took place at the Pacific Hotel. They appointed a committee which last Saturday made the nominations, and in consequence ...

    German
    I F 2, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 05, 1873
    A Sedan for the Knownothings

    Sedan! The election is over and the enemy is beaten. His strongest fortifications have fallen into our hands. The people's party has won. It is still impossible for the moment to say how great our victory is. All our friends have stood by us; the Irish in the entire city; the Bohemians in the 8th ward; the Scandinavians in the 11th and 16th wards; the French and the Poles in the 7th and 9th wards.

    The campaign committee of the People's Party, rented in the afternoon, when victory was certain, the lower hall in the Kingsbury Block. By 7 P. M. an immense crowd had assembled there, A description of the jubilation is impossible. At 8:30 o'clock A. C. Hesing went to the meeting. He received a thunderous reception. In his speech A. C. Hesing told the audience that the following telegram had been sent to Mayor Medill:

    Joseph Medill,

    Fer address of the American Embassy,

    Paris.

    2

    "Your policy has been defeated by ten thousand majority."

    Rehm and Hesing.

    Sedan! The election is over and the enemy is beaten. His strongest fortifications have fallen into our hands. The people's party has won. It is still impossible for the moment ...

    German
    I F 2, I F 4, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 16, 1874
    A Mixed Assembly.

    Tax inspector and mailman Francis Rodmann convoked yesterday a meeting in the restaurant of Fritz Frillmann, in order to organize the Republican Party of the North side.

    Mr. Barker, candidate for the legislature, described the sufferings of the negro in the south.

    Rodman as next speaker said he would like to talk about a man who claims to be a friend of the laboring class, but who isn't, namely A. C. Hesing. A man who drives every Sunday to Lincoln park in a stolen coach..... This was the end of Rodmann's speech and of the meeting. The majority of the assembly cried out: "You rascal, no calumny. Every one knows that A. C. Hesing's coach is a gift."

    During the ensuing confusion the meeting was adjourned.

    Tax inspector and mailman Francis Rodmann convoked yesterday a meeting in the restaurant of Fritz Frillmann, in order to organize the Republican Party of the North side. Mr. Barker, candidate ...

    German
    I F 2, I H, IV
  • Der Westen -- September 26, 1875
    Independent Citizens of the Seventeenth Ward Enthusiastic Meeting

    Citizens of the Seventeenth Ward met at Bleimes' Hall yesterday. During the coming local election these citizens will act as an independent body since they do not care to be affiliated with any party. The numerous participation showed that, even if the majority of the Ward's residents do not subscribe to this nonpartisan attitude, a large number of then believe in such independence. The oldest and most respected residents of the district appeared at the Hall.

    Henry Mayer opened the meeting and nominated Theodore Karls as chairman. He was unanimously elected.

    Theodore Karl's Speech

    "Citizens! We are facing an election of city and county officials. It 2behooves us, therefore, to congregate here as citizens of this Ward. The object of this meeting is to exchange ideas and to devise a way whereby....we may find a method to enable us to give public offices to the most deserving men; that is, to such men as have proved themselves honorable in the past, and have shown that they are unblemished above corruption, and endowed with qualities making them eligible for public positions. When we attain such a goal, honor will accrue to us.

    "We have come here neither to object to the existing order, nor to support corrupt, ambitious office-seekers.

    "Although this--our program--was emblazoned on the standard of the people's party two years ago, and though we still adhere to it today in a certain measure, it does not signify that we are fully satisfied with the accomplishments of the people's party. However, we do not desire to ascribe the shortcomings of this party to the founders, as they had the best of intentions.

    3

    What was the reason for organizing the People's party?

    "You all known that the coalition between the German-speaking citizens of Chicago and the Green Islanders [Irish] was effected solely to throttle the schemes of a small but powerful, hypocritical sect which attempted to restrict our freedom and personal rights, and to forbid our customs, to which we had adhered since early Mouth.

    "It is almost amazing how the American nation still ignores the precept that everyone should be allowed to seek happiness according to his own beliefs, and how intolerance has become the order of the day, where as tolerance should rule, since it is and ought to be the expression of the present century.

    "You know how the German liberal element two years ago won a memorable election, a triumph over hypocrisy and bigotry No greater result could have been conceived. Surely, no German-speaking citizen thought at the time that this victory 4would be the source of unbridled activities and disorder; now did he regard the alliance with the Democrats as a permanent affiliation with the Democratic party.

    "But this last point is one which concerns our national politics, and hence should not and must not enter into local affairs. Chicago alone concerns us at present. It is immaterial to us whether a worthy candidate for this or that office subscribes to the Democratic or Republican doctrine. We are concerned only with the character and the ability of the man. Toward this end, citizens, lend a helping hand and do your utmost!"

    Hy. Mayer was elected secretary.

    Mr. Korff made a motion that English should be spoken; that is, that the proceedings should be in English.

    James Ennis was of the opinion that the chairman should translate the motions into English, and that the speakers should be allowed to speak in English. He 5added that it would be unfair to curtail the freedom of expression of those who are unable properly to express themselves in English. The motion, with the amendment of James Ennis, was adopted.

    Adolph Mueller made a motion that a committee of five be nominated. James Ennis seconded the motion.

    Dr. Shields made a motion to nominate Hy. Mayer as chairman of the assembly. Mr. Karls declared that he had been nominated as the chairman and that he would relinquish his position only to the president of the club which was to be founded. Adolph Mueller answered that no club was needed at present; that the first essential was to resolve what the body intended to do and to nominate a committee which would formulate resolutions. The motion was adopted. The chairman nominated Messrs. John Stack, Hy. Strauss, Adolph Mueller, James Ennis and Hy. Hand.

    While the committee deliberated, Francis A. Hofmann, Jr., mounted the platform 6and said that he was always glad to observe a lively participation in important political questions. "As long as a party is in the minority," he asserted, "everybody agrees; but if a party wins, then one always finds individuals who insist on foisting their peculiar ideas upon the masses. This is but natural and right. Everyone has the right to air his opinions." He continued: "I hear that this meeting has not been called in the interest of any single party. There are thousands in the city who are thoroughly dissatisfied with the ruling national party, although they are not willing to change to another party. But they are willing to forego partisanship in the coming city election, and they intend to entrust our local public offices only to such men as they have confidence in, regardless of party.

    "The citizens of the Seventeenth Ward have always acted in this manner. They voted for the Democrat Schintz at a time when the Seventeenth Ward was the strongest Republican ward; in fact, they supported him several times because they considered him preferable to his opponent, Schaffner. And later, they 7voted for the Republican Schaffner when the opposition showed a tremendous majority, because they considered Schaffner preferable to the opposing candidate."

    The speaker remarked that the Republican party was indulging in a lot of nonsense. "It has tried to foster the belief," he said, "that there are no real differences between Democrats and Republicans. I would not object to this statement if it were true. But the Republican party has sinned so fearfully that it has lost its hold on the public, and so the Republican party deserves to be beaten. The Republican party is to blame for twenty thousand cases of bankruptcy and for a loss of five hundred million dollars in capital during the last few years.

    "But in the state of Illinois there is no Democratic party. We only have an opposition party; the platform is the old platform of the Republican party of 1860. Any Republican sharing in the views of that period may vote for it--and 8so may every Democrat."

    He admonished the assembly to vote only for honest, capable men. Although he is a Democrat, he has often voted, he asserted, for a Republican who happened to be an able man.

    The committee then reported that it had drafted the resolutions, which had been unanimously accepted. James Ennis remarked that the report was written in both English and German.

    The Resolutions

    "We, the citizens of the Seventeenth Ward, assembled at a mass meeting, do declare:

    "Whereas The impending city and county elections do not involve questions of 9national importance, so that the only issue affecting our citizens is the honesty and ability of the candidates to be elected to our local offices; and

    "Whereas During the approaching election, party divisions are contemplated along lines involving national problems which can only succeed in reviving such questions as compulsory temperance, Sunday laws, etc., which should be avoided; be it therefore

    "Resolved, That it is the opinion of this assembly that the citizens of this Ward should admonish their fellow citizens that it would be very imprudent to inject national political questions into the local election, and that this assembly advocates the creation of a citizens' movement for the sole purpose of obtaining an honest, capable administration in county offices."

    The resolutions were accepted, and a motion to organize permanently was made and passed. Hy. Mayer was nominated as president; James Ennis was elected 10secretary; John Stack was elected treasurer. Dr. Shields made a motion to nominate an executive committee of five.

    After repeated requests Hans Haerting mounted the stage. He said that he was not a citizen of the Seventeenth Ward, that he, therefore, had not come to take part in the deliberations; that he had appeared merely because he was interested in observing the important activities of the Seventeenth Ward preparatory to the coming election, since the ward had always exerted strong political influence. "I am glad that not only the older element is represented here, but that the younger people, also, have come in such large numbers," he said. "Although the latter will not be able to decide the destiny of the county at present....the future belongs to youth.....The Tribune, in particular, is exceedingly desirous of bringing back the German vote to the Republican fold....."

    The speaker criticized the Republican press, going into great detail...."And 11now," he said, "the Tribune wants to give good advice to the Germans; that paper claims that only the Republican party can bring salvation to the Chicago Germans. How great this Republican friendship for the Germans really is, can readily be seen. On the one hand, we observe the attempts to bring the Germans back into the rold; on the other, we find the most bitter vilification of the Germans and the foreign-born element in general."

    The speaker then quoted some very revealing statements from the Tribune....."If the program is strictly adhered to," he said; "that is, if, in voting, we consider only the qualifications of the candidate....then we are bound to win a far-reaching victory in the ward, the city, and the county."

    Hy. Strauss, Dr. Shields, Dr. Geiger, Gustav A. Korn, and Wm. Hartney were nominated to the Executive Committee. The meeting was then adjourned.

    Citizens of the Seventeenth Ward met at Bleimes' Hall yesterday. During the coming local election these citizens will act as an independent body since they do not care to be ...

    German
    I F 2, I F 3, I B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 04, 1875
    A. C. Hesing

    A. C. Hesing has been beaten by a small majority. It is apparent that A. C. Hesing has been beaten by Mr. Keeley and not by the friends of Mr. Huck (by them only in so far, as they provided funds which enabled Keeley to continue his fight.) Mr. Hesing had to fight against the combined campaign of lies of the Tribune, Times, Inter-Ocean, and Journal.

    The entire fight was a contest of personalities and of the three, A. C. Hesing was by far the most outstanding. One remarkable fact of the campaign was that nothing detrimental to the honesty of A. C. Hesing was brought to light.

    A. C. Hesing has been beaten by a small majority. It is apparent that A. C. Hesing has been beaten by Mr. Keeley and not by the friends of Mr. ...

    German
    I F 5, I F 2, I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 22, 1876
    [New Hall Dedicated]

    of the newly erected hall of the Chicago Labor Society on Desplaines Street was celebrated last night wick all the dignity and air of distinction appropriate to such occasions.

    A large audience was present, the majority of which was composed of the old German citizens, amongst them the old Hoeken and F. Erbe, who as president of the building committee has done much toward its success, also Mr. Degenkardt and others. An orchestra under the direction of the young violin virtuoso George Hermann gave a splendid concert.

    The song section of the Social Labor Society gave a few songs after which the president of the society, Mr. A. Holz, in a short speech introduced the main speakers of the evening, Mr. Francis A. Hofmann, Jr., who in turn expressed his appreciation of the honor of being chosen to deliver the celebration speech, although he is the youngest member of the oldest society: "Ladies and Gentlemen! Your participation in this celebration which you adorn by your presence shows that you have the welfare of the Labor Society at heart. The completion of this building 2which we in today's celebration dedicate to our society with the purpose well known, is a new chapter in its history. It is human nature that after a certain lapse of time we look back upon notable moments; therefore it seems appropriate on this occasion to give a mental picture of this Society's past.

    The Chicago Labor Society was founded in the year 1858 with the aim of furthering the German worker socially as well as intellectually, and for cultivating and propogating the German spirit of happiness and cheerfulness. Thanks to the efforts of the society the library disposes of 4,000 books, amongst them a number of excellent works. Free lessons of useful knowledge were given the younger members of the society and the arena of debate saw many an experienced fighter. The society worked on a principle, that the field of activity has to be unlimited. There were 1,200 members at the society's most prosperous time. Nevertheless, the society did not become absorbed in its own interests but as a link of the great chain, it kept in touch with the outer world and frequently busied itself with political questions. Is the deadly enemy against free work and general mental development raised its demonic head in the south, this society displayed an activity for which it still 3receives our just admiration.

    The members not only followed the call of the Fatherland in distress, but the needy families of those courageous fighters were helped by the society. In short, the Labor Society rendered at that time of distress its duty to patriotism and humanitarianism most extensively.

    In the year of 1869 the society acquired a lot for its own home, the same on which we now stand. But the same element which seems to have a preference for our city, consumed on May 10th of the following year our labor hall.

    The society was hit hard for they were not able financially to create a new building.

    Let us proclaim this new building as the citadel of citizens' faith and of human rights, and without pledging allegiance to any leader or party and without intolerance of the opinions of others let us spread the eternal doctrines of the rights of man. Let this new building be instrumental in the fight against corruption, exploitation, hypocrisy, nativism and temperance by the use of free speech!

    of the newly erected hall of the Chicago Labor Society on Desplaines Street was celebrated last night wick all the dignity and air of distinction appropriate to such occasions. A ...

    German
    I F 2, II B 1 c 3, II B 1 a, II B 2 f, I F 3, I F 6, I H, I B 1