The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • The Filipino Bulletin -- April 07, 1934
    Recent Act for Debate

    What promises to be a "corker" in the history of the Center's debating society will be held next Thursday, April 12th, when the Tydings-McDuffie Act will be the subject for debate.

    The proposition is "Resolved that the Filipinos should accept the Tydings McDuffie Act." Francisco P. Pilapil and Dominador R. Somera will defend the affirmative side,and Jose C. Alba and Luis S. Quianio will argue for the negative.

    What promises to be a "corker" in the history of the Center's debating society will be held next Thursday, April 12th, when the Tydings-McDuffie Act will be the subject for ...

    Filipino
    II B 2 g
  • The Filipino Bulletin -- April 07, 1934
    Church Group Center's Guest By Geraldine Ragel

    On Sunday, March 25th, members of the Epworth League of the Englewood Methodist Church were guests of the Filipino Center. They were in attendance at both the Sunday School hour and the church service and were deeply impressed by the serious note of the questions asked the speaker; question bearing on the subject of war and its relation to the church.

    After these servises Rev. Laxamana and Mr. Gonzales escorted the visitors to the gayly decorated social room where they immediately caught the festive spirit of their hosts. The first part of the evening was spent in playing games and learning to know each other. Then stunts were performed by three different groups. Rev. Laxamana prepared a varied and interesting program consisting of several numbers by the Filipino stringed 2ensemble, and vocal selections sung by Mr. Frank Gordon. Then, to the delight of the whole group, refreshments were served and a delicious birthday cake was cut in honor of the birthdays of three members.

    At nine o'clock, "Good-night Ladies" was sung and the guests departed for home with a new and different attitude toward Filipinos.

    The companionship was enjoyed and a bond of friendship was made between the two groups which should prove lasting. More affairs of this sort should be sponsored in the future in order that better relations might be maintained between American and Filipino young people.

    On Sunday, March 25th, members of the Epworth League of the Englewood Methodist Church were guests of the Filipino Center. They were in attendance at both the Sunday School hour ...

    Filipino
    II D 6, I C, IV
  • The Filipino Bulletin -- April 07, 1934
    Medical Men Start Movement for Community Hospital as Organization Gets in Swing Filipino Doctors and Dentists Probe into Needs of Island Community: Meet at Palmer House by Serapion B. Ledesma, M.D

    The movement to establish a hospital in order to serve the needs of Filipinos in the city of Chicago got into full swing April 4th when Filipino physicians and dentists met at the Palmer House and founded the Filipino Medico-Dental Association.

    Officers were elected at this meeting. Dr. Apolonio F. Montezon was named chief of staff; Dr. S.B. Ledesma, recorder; Dr. Potenciano V. Varilla, comptroller; Dr. Jose Zialcita Cailles, recreational director; Dr. A.E. Ablaza, chairman of the hospitalization committee.

    2

    The financial committee is headed by Dr. Baltazar G. Raz, as chairman, Members of the financial committee include Dr. Francisco M. Duerme, Dr. F. I. Aguila, and Dr. F. Hicano.

    Who is going to be director of public relations is not definitely decided yet but announcement will be made in the near future.

    National Pride

    The Filipino physicians and dentists of the city of Chicago have long sought to uphold the integrity and pride of both the medical and dental professions in order that we as a group of people may be able sufficiently to take care of our brothers who need both medical and dental care. We need your faith and confidence to enable us to cope with various conditions of human ailments. Your undivided support would substantiate the purpose of the Filipino physicians and dental professions.

    3

    In our experiences in the practice of medicine and dentistry in Chicago, we have many occasions to see patients who were in need of hospitalization but could not have it due to lack of funds. To such a misfortune we are all subject sooner or later during our existence; but through well organized community we can establish an institution of our own which will take care of ourselves. This New Deal is a challenge to every thinking Filipino who unselfishly lives his life. This movement we have initiated is not only needed in the City of Chicago but also in other cities in the United States where there are Filipinos. Not long ago the birthday of President Franklin D. Roosevelt was celebrated throughout the nation and has been capitalized to obtain funds for care of sufferers of Infantile Paralysis. Over a million dollars have been raised to perpetuate the humanitarian principles which will serve as a monument to the New Deal.

    4

    Long Wait

    After the conference concerning the New Deal we have decided to establish a dispensary clinic through which we can gladly serve the Filipino community of this metropolis. You should avail yourselves of this opportunity, the burden is ours whether we like it or not we have to take care of it ourselves. Keep up your faith, devotion and prayers for our countrymen who are in sympathy with our many mistakes and pitfalls.

    With the cooperation of various organizations of this city, we feel that the movement of the New Deal would succeed. On the contrary, no matter how good the proposition is presented to you and no matter how capable we are to run this enterprise, we are doomed to fail without the dynamic force of action from you.

    5

    Earning Power Law

    During the present conditions we have learned that our earning power has greatly diminished whatever work or enterprise we may handle; as a result many of us could not meet the expense of medical care. To alleviate our suffering the medical and dental professionals have thought of this movement; furthermore, we cannot escape old age and therefore, it is essential not to forget the New Deal which we are presenting for your consideration now. The New Deal is ours and we must support it at any cost.

    From our daily experiences every nation has her national pride and doubtless we Filipinos have our own. It is natural that we should show our Filipino pride even to the least extent possible. The New Deal would serve the purpose and you would then have your institution.

    6

    Public Hospital

    It is true that there are public hospitals in Chicago which may take care of us at their own rate which in many occasions we could meet. As a consequence we have to resort to charity institutions which are not much interested in us. Through cooperation we can make the New Deal of service to all.

    There are at least five thousand Filipinos in the city and several hundred families with approximately seven hundred to one thousand children in whom we are profoundly interested. The majority of these families are sufficient to provide professional medical care. The minority perhaps are forced to apply to the various city clinics for medical treatment. The aim of the New Deal is primarily to extend a helping hand to those who are otherwise unable to obtain medical aid. Frequent examinations of these children will prevent many untold sufferings both for the parent and the child. Deformities and complications are great drawbacks in the future attainments of our children We solicit your faith in us and remember that it is our earnest purpose to give you the best that medical science can afford.

    7

    Ask Cooperation

    The Filipino physicians and dentists of Chicago appeal to the different Filipino organizations and to the American people who are in sympathy with our cause to cooperate with us in this movement. We need the support of everyone at all times. We must start somewhere no matter how small; hence, we need your moral and financial support.

    Financial Sources

    We don't hesitate to say, without reservation, that our existing organizations of the city and American friends will gladly cooperate with the New Deal. To maintain such an institution it requires money. There are thousands of dollars that are being raised and paid out by various organizations to the hotels of this city every month for entertainment purposes.

    8

    From every such function held by an individual club to help the New Deal enough should be realized to purchase the necessary instruments and bandages. Such funds will furnish a substantial income for the maintenance of the dispensary clinic.

    While attempting a relatively new movement in the field of human endeavor the scope of the New Deal is fulfilling an important requirement in this new era of the progress of civilization and the advancement of the Filipino race. The New Deal was conceived as a powerful influence in cementing a firmer relationship between our brothers far and near through a common bond of human interest. In sponsoring this ideal we believe that the time has arrived to broaden our social, professional and economic horizon.

    The sincerity of your cooperation can not be question but the continuance of your helpful interest is needed and petitioned. We look forward with hope and courage, for better days and better friendship for the great 9family for the imperishable brotherhood of all Filipinos. We shall always cherish with affectionate pride the memories that linger from our association in this New Deal for the advancement of human happiness. Let us hear from you. Let us have your suggestion for building this New Deal into the kind of a resting place that you believe will be most beneficial to you and the community.

    The movement to establish a hospital in order to serve the needs of Filipinos in the city of Chicago got into full swing April 4th when Filipino physicians and dentists ...

    Filipino
    II D 3, IV, I C
  • The Filipino Bulletin -- April 07, 1934
    Small Men, Big Men

    Sunday, April 8th, is the annual election of the Filipino Association of Chicago. On that day Filipinos who still look up to the Association as the only official and national Filipino organization in this part of the country are given a chance to correct the mistakes of the past and begin anew.

    The organization is rightfully the mother of Filipino organizations in Chicago. Behind it is a history rich in accomplishments of men and women who were once its members and officers and on whose shoulders rested the heavy responsibility of shaping the destiny and affairs of the Philippines.

    It was in 1906 that the Filipino Association first came into being. Through the years it glided on. It is the oldest Filipino organization anywhere in the Western Hemisphere. Those were the days when first things really came first.

    2

    But as the years rolled on small men found themselves at the helm whose philosophy in life is that the mighty dollar is real power in everything. And these small men got in places of authority with tainted votes and dirty politics. It also marked the rise of the social climbers, the windjammers, the hocuspocuses and the plunderers of public funds.

    The rise of local organizations - their multiplicity, the relentless competition in social activities, the duplication of efforts in time, resources, and the rise of sectionalism, - all these are sins of the F. A. C. For, if the F. A. C. had not been recreant to its duties all would have been well in our community.

    But rather than destroy, let us build. It is on this principle that we are appealing to the public to give the F. A. C. another chance, if, after the election the organization continues to be a breeding place for dirty politics, sectionalism, the training school of public plunderers and nincompoops, we might as well fold tent and decamp - junk and debunk the organization to the garbage can, or place it in a museum as a reminder of Filipino incompetence and mismanagement.

    3

    If the F. A. C. should continue to exist and deserve the support of the public, it is high time to place men and women at the helm who are humble but conscientious; who place the public welfare above their personal ambitions; who talk in terms of brass backs; who are righteously aggressive, and who are possessed of the ability not only to think but also the conscience to rethink. For the individuals of this type are really the big men and women of our community.

    The facts in our political life here are explicitly these: (1) the political demagogues are running our affairs; (2) to insure themselves of their continuity in power, they buy votes; (3) during election, they place their henchmen at the polls to permit each individual to vote ten different times or more under different aliases; (4) they even go out of town to get voters, and (5) after the election, they divide the loot because to the victors belong the spoils.

    Let us hope that the candidates this year, especially the presidential aspirants, are men who are thinking in the right direction.

    Luis S. Quianio.

    Sunday, April 8th, is the annual election of the Filipino Association of Chicago. On that day Filipinos who still look up to the Association as the only official and national ...

    Filipino
    III B 4, I F 6
  • The Filipino Bulletin -- April 07, 1934
    Quezon Stops at Center to Greet Crowds National Idol Returns Home in Blaze of Merited Glory By Luis S. Quianio

    The Filipino Community of Chicago paused for a brief spell Wednesday, April 4th, and paid its respects to Senate-President Manuel L. Quezon and members of the independence mission. It was a great day for Filipinos in the city for the presence of the national idol even for only ten minutes made them realize that the long-sought and much-coveted independence has really come. They cheered the aging man who had to be carried through the winding steps of the Filipino Community Center, 837 N. La Salle St., up to the office and thence to the chapel.

    Thousands Keep Vigil

    The thousands of Filipinos, who kept the vigil at the early hours of the morning watching the coming of the conquering hero, stood at 2attention and bareheaded as Quezon was ushered in to face the barage of photographers. He concealed his breaking health with smiles and in a few chosen words he addressed the anxious spectators. "My countrymen," he said, "I do not have much time to spare, but I am with you in heart and spirit."

    This was the laconic message, as laconic as Ceasar's message across the Alps, "I came, I saw, I conquered." History has repeated itself. For Quezon also came, saw and conquered. He got the Tydings-McDuffie Act.

    Arrived Early

    The Quezon entourage stopped only one hour and thirty-five minutes in Chicago. Arriving on the Liberty Limited at 8:25 A.M., the missioners were again on their way at 10:00 A.M. That was the first stop from Washington, and the trip is one long stretch from Chicago to Vancouver, and from Vancouver to Manila.

    3

    Quezon's Party

    With President Quezon were Senator and Mrs. Elpidio Quirino, and Antonio Quirino, brother of the senator; Rafael Alunan, former secretary of the department of finance and now president of the Philippine Sugar Planter's Association; Isauro Gabaldon, former resident commissioner and president of the Philippine Civic Union, and Representative Nieto of Cagayan, Quezon's personal bodyguard.

    Antonio A. Gonzales, director of the Filipino Community Center, and Mrs. Gonzales were host and hostess during the day. It was Gonzales who led the community's reception committee to the union depot and brought the party to the Center where a breakfast was to have been served but limited time prevented its execution.

    F. A. C. Queens

    The two queens of the Filipino Association of Chicago, Misses Pearl Nasberg and Vida Illiot stayed behind to receive the party at the Community Center.

    4

    They were in charge of the breakfast arrangements as well as decorating the hall.

    The reception committee that met the missioners at the depot were Mr. and Mrs. Antonio Gonzales, Quintin A. Yumul, president of the Filipino Association of Chicago; Jose M. Albertson, president of the Pampaugan Circle; Lino D.Onagan, president of the Ilocos Nortenean Association; Rafael M. de Leon, former president of the same organization; Simeon Biason, retiring vice-president of the United Pangasinanes; Dr. Isidoro L. P. De Vera, president of Balagtas Club, and Mrs. De Vera; Anastasio D. Joven, president of the Ilocos Sur Club; Dr. Baltazar G. Raz, Dr. Serapion B. Ledesma, Dr. F. Hicaro, instructor in the Chicago Medical College; Larry Laureano, president of the Big V; Mrs. D. Onagan, social chairman of the United Ladies Club, Dr. and Mrs. Jose Zialcita Cailles, Baldomero T. Olivera, and Euginio M. Estacion.

    The Filipino Community of Chicago paused for a brief spell Wednesday, April 4th, and paid its respects to Senate-President Manuel L. Quezon and members of the independence mission. It was ...

    Filipino
    III H, IV, I C
  • Associated Filipino Press -- December 30, 1934
    Free Literary Program and Dance for Friends of the Filipinos Associated Clubs Sponsor Unique Affair at Steuben Club, December 30

    The most unique Rizal Day commemoration in the history of Chicago, since Filipinos have begun residing from way back in 1906, will be held at the Grand Auditorium of the Steuben Club Building when the Associated Filipino Clubs will celebrate the 38th anniversary of the death of Dr. Jose Rizal, Filipino martyr and hero.

    Free Admission.

    The affair will be free to the general public and to all Filipinos and their American friends. It will consist of a literary program and also a dance.

    The literary program will precede the dance. This free affair will be the first of its kind since Filipinos have been celebrating Rizal Day in the city.

    2

    Among the participants in the literary program will be the winners of the annual oratorical and declamation contest. An invitation has been forwarded to Senator James Hamilton Lewis who is to be the principal speaker. A colorful feature will be the coronation of a queen who will be selected by a committee of prominent citizens of the community.

    Juan de la Paz, chief executive of the Associated Clubs, announced recently that the Rizal Day affair, this year, will be dedicated to true nationalism and to the principles for which the Filipino National Idol gave up his life. It will be a new chapter in the life of the Filipinos in the city.

    Montezon For Toastmaster

    Dr. Apolonio F. Montezon, President of the Filipino Gibbons Society, has accepted the toastmastership. Attorney Marcelino E. Moreno authorization officer of the Veteran's Bureau at Hines, Illinois, is head man of all the committees; Dr. Isidoro L. P. de Vera, of the Dental Staff of the Veteran's Hospital, is chairman of the Social Committee; Dr. Juan G. Udan, (Ph.D.) President of the Filipino Times, is chairman of the Publicity Committee; and Rev. F. Laxamana, of the Filipino Chapel, is chairman of the Program Committee.

    The most unique Rizal Day commemoration in the history of Chicago, since Filipinos have begun residing from way back in 1906, will be held at the Grand Auditorium of the ...

    Filipino
    III B 3 a, III A, II B 1 d, II B 1 c 3, III B 2
  • Associated Filipino Press -- December 30, 1934
    Daily News Editorial Writer to Speak at the Filipino Community Center

    S.J. Duncan-Clark, editorial writer of the Chicago Daily News, will speak at the meeting of the Art Class in the Filipino Community Center, on Tuesday evening, January 8, according to an announcement made by Miss Lucille Windett, our art class instructor.

    It was also reported that several prominent artists and professional men in Chicago, primarily interested in the work of the Filipino Community Center, are scheduled to speak from time to time this coming calendar year.

    Among the many that have already spoken in Miss Windett's class were: Mr. Paterson of the Chicago Public Library; Mr. Smith, of the Advertising Dept., Chicago Tribune: and many others.

    S.J. Duncan-Clark, editorial writer of the Chicago Daily News, will speak at the meeting of the Art Class in the Filipino Community Center, on Tuesday evening, January 8, according to ...

    Filipino
    II B 2 g, III B 2, II B 2 f
  • Associated Filipino Press -- December 30, 1934
    Journalist Speaks at Sunday Forum Miss Diaz Delivers Sermon in the Absence of Rev. Laxamana

    Mr. Warren E. Thompson was the speaker at the Sunday Forum held at the Filipino Chapel last week. His subject was: "Are Religious Convictions Futile in a Practical World?"

    Mr. Thompson is a graduate of the University of Chicago. While at the University he was the editor of the "Daily Maroon." He has written many articles for various magazines and has done a great deal of journalistic work. At present, he is the editor of "Adventure in Religion" which tells the story of the needs, the work, and the value of the various Settlements, Centers, and Neighborhood Houses in the city. He is also connected with the Publicity Work of the Congregational Union.

    In the absence of Rev. F. Laxamana, believed to be out on a lecture tour, Miss Flora Diaz delivered the sermon. Her subject was: What is a religious man? She was introduced by Rev. Paul Estrera, assistant pastor of the church.

    F.A. Lopez, editor of the "Filipino Press", presiding chairman of the Forum, introduced Mr. Warren E. Thompson.

    Mr. Warren E. Thompson was the speaker at the Sunday Forum held at the Filipino Chapel last week. His subject was: "Are Religious Convictions Futile in a Practical World?" Mr. ...

    Filipino
    II B 2 g, I B 4, III C
  • Associated Filipino Press -- December 30, 1934
    Our Openmindedness

    The Filipinos in Chicago still possess their sense of openmindedness, especially when one of their national celebrations is under way.

    The spirit of openmindedness prevails among the Filipinos in New York, Los Angeles, and in many principal cities throughout the United States where Filipinos have occasion to honor their greatest hero, Dr. Jose Rizal.

    Rizal Day Queens were elected in many Filipino communities throughout America. There is a prevalence of a sane openmindedness among the Filipinos in America. But there are a few rugged individuals, who, in spite of this, cherish a prejudice against candidates or queens slated from other nationalities than the Filipino. Thanks, that after election of the queens, there spiteful spirit crumbles.

    Last Sunday, with the exception of "Miss Philippines", the Filipino in this city expressed their friendly confidence and openmindedness by electing as queen, a few American beauties, whom they have found friendly.

    2

    The spirit of these candidates is fairly understood. They are always willing to lend a helping hand to our local problems. This should be borne in mind and be well understood by all Filipinos, including the few who whisper in dark corners.

    Dr. Jose Rizal himself, whose memory we dearly and fondly honor, was married to one who was not of his own race. In him was borne and manifested a great spirit of sane openmindedness and sane internationalism, which is regrettably found wanting among the squawkers who are always criticizing the idea of electing, for Rizal Day queens, some hard working American girls.

    The Filipinos in Chicago still possess their sense of openmindedness, especially when one of their national celebrations is under way. The spirit of openmindedness prevails among the Filipinos in New ...

    Filipino
    III B 3 a, I B 2
  • Associated Filipino Press -- December 30, 1934
    [The Rizal Day]

    Meet the 1934 Rizal Day orator of the F.A.C., Mr. Mariano Cejavo, a forceful speaker. F.A.C. contest judges unanimously picked him as "Number 1 public speaker". When interviewed "orador" (orator) Cejavo said that this is his third time that he has entered into oratorical contests. Unlike others, who, at the face of defeat, become lukewarm and jelly fish, Cejavo's previous defeats only strengthened his moral stamina giving him courage and patience, and as a result he came out victorious in the recent contest. His piece will be published in our current edition.

    Meet the 1934 Rizal Day orator of the F.A.C., Mr. Mariano Cejavo, a forceful speaker. F.A.C. contest judges unanimously picked him as "Number 1 public speaker". When interviewed "orador" (orator) ...

    Filipino
    II B 2 g, III B 3 a