The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Onze Toekomst -- January 12, 1906
    The Closing of the Saloons on Sunday (Editorial)

    Much has been said and written lately, as to whether or not the saloons should be closed on Sunday. Let us say, here and now, that we would strongly favor the closing of the saloons on Sunday. The possibility of this is another question. Then Mayor Dunne was a candidate for Mayor, he was requested by a committee from the "Women's Christian Temperance Union" and representatives of other temperance societies to answer the question: That if he were elected Mayor of Chicago, whether or not he would force the saloonkeepers to keep their doors closed to the public on Sunday? The Nayoral Candidate answered that he was not ready to answer this question, but that he could assure them, the committees, that he would enforce the law as it was actually written.

    Dunne was elected, but the saloons stayed open to the great disappointment of the "Women's Christian Temperance Union". Some assert that 2the Mayor does not keep his word and does not enforce the law, and they even call this a wanton violation of the oath which he took when he was installed as Mayor of Chicago. There is, so they declare, a law which prohibits the keeping open of saloons on Sunday and this law is not enforced.

    This declaration is not without good grounds. Indeed there is such a law. Although old, it is not obsolete, but is so covered by political dust and filth that it is hard to find and can,positively not be seen by the naked eye. But the Mayor, and in his name also the Chief of Police, declare that they have nothing to do with the enforcement of this law. It is, so they declare, not a City ordinance, but a State law, which compels the closing on Sunday, and if the State law must be enforced, then they must go to the Governor with their request. The Governor is the man who must take care of that, says Mayor Dunne. The Governor is also deaf to the request. He declares that he was not chosen to act as a bailiff or a policeman. And so things continue. The saloons stay open. No one feels himself responsible enough to enforce the law, be it the Mayor, 3the Chief of Police, or even the Governor of the State of Illinois.

    Just one question in conclusion: Why do we have so many laws which are being construed as unenforceable? The Sunday Closing law as well as many others, was never enforced and will evidently remain a dead letter.

    Much has been said and written lately, as to whether or not the saloons should be closed on Sunday. Let us say, here and now, that we would strongly favor ...

    Dutch
    I B 2
  • Onze Toekomst -- January 19, 1906
    [League Plans Delayed]

    The death of President Harper of Chicago University will delay the plans of the General Dutch League. The League is busy making plans to secure a course in the Dutch language at Chicago University.

    According to our information, Dr. Harper was favorable to starting such a course. That he, just now, should be called from his field of labor at the age of forty-nine is to be regretted the more for that reason. We hope that his successor will be even more favorable to our cause.

    The death of President Harper of Chicago University will delay the plans of the General Dutch League. The League is busy making plans to secure a course in the Dutch ...

    Dutch
    I A 1 b, III B 2
  • Onze Toekomst -- January 26, 1906
    The Chicago Division of the "A. N. V."("General Dutch League")

    The Chicago Division of the "General Dutch League," held its annual general meeting, last Wednesday, as advertised. The attendance was fairly good, although it could have been better. Even though the number of those attending was not large, their spirit for the worthy purpose of the League was much greater and each of those present showed by word and deed that they had resolved to work continuously to achieve that purpose. Two officers had to be chosen, a President and a Vice-President. For President H. Berends was re-elected and for Vice-President, the Rev. E. Breen, in place of H. U. Masman, the retiring member. The report of the Treasurer showed a net balance of $8 for the year. The report of the Secretary was very encouraging. From that we report the following: It is nearly two years since your reporter came from Michigan to Chicago. In Michigan he was a member of the Grand Rapids division, which formed a part of the "Western Branch D", of the "General Dutch League". When he arrived here, he found no division, and he felt as though he were missing something. Through correspondence with the Board of Directors he saw the possibility of organizing a independent division for Chicago. He spoke about that with some of his friends, with the result that on May 29th, a meeting was held for that purpose in Ruehl's Hall. On this first meeting, nineteen persons showed their readiness to become members of the new division. Although the necessary twenty members to form an independent 2division was not reached, there was no doubt that on a following meeting there would be more than enough. For this reason it was resolved to meet again in the near future. On June 8th we met again, this time in the hall at 535 Blue Island Ave. Three new members joined and so our membership rose to twenty-two, and our infant was born on June 8th, 1905. A Constitution and by-laws were made up, and the name, "Division Chicago of the General Dutch League" accepted. It was decided to hold another meeting as soon as possible and this took place on June 21st. On the occasion of this meeting we gained another new member, and a permanent Board was chosen consisting of the following gentlemen: Berends, Masman, Jacobsma, De - Boer and Holstein. Since that time, proceedings have gone on in the regular way. The Board has met seven times. On August 31st, (Queens Day), a general meeting was held in which all could participate. This meeting was well attended and could be called very successful. In the press, the Board defended the language and the honor of our Nation, as, among others, in a Dutch paper, that had the temerity to say that "the Dutch language was a luxury," in the Chicago Daily News, which declared that The Hague was the capitol of the Netherlands. Regular correspondence was had with the central Board of Directors. It recognized us as an independent self-supporting division and served us by giving help and advice. so for my report. Let us prepare, with the greatest of effort, to carry on as good citizens of the United States, those ideals, the American life by which our nation is known. And this we cannot do except by working in unison, strong efforts, 3and true perseverence. When we do this, we can extort respect from our fellow -citizens, and they will also recognize us as a nation, and why not? Our past is glorious, but our present, also is not to be overlooked. To mention only a few things for instance: Our artists Mesdag, Bosman, Israels. Are they not famous? And are not our Dutch engineers being given preference in foreign countries? For example: De Ryke, in China. and what is the reason that we should not be able to do something here? Why is there no course at the Chicago University in Dutch history and literature? Why could not a Dutch Chamber of Commerce flourish here as well as elsewhere? Why... but I end with the wish that we all have the feeling that we can amount to something here, if we insist. The "Division" now has a total membership of thirty. The number should be three hundred. Apply for membership to the Secretary, H. Jacobsma, 620 W. 14th Place - Chicago.

    The Chicago Division of the "General Dutch League," held its annual general meeting, last Wednesday, as advertised. The attendance was fairly good, although it could have been better. Even though ...

    Dutch
    III B 4, I C
  • Onze Toekomst -- February 02, 1906
    [Benefit Society Meets]

    Thursday evening, the members of the "Roseland Sick Benefit Society," held a meeting at the home of Mr. Otto, 10928 Michigan Avenue. The following officers were chosen: Jos. Fisher, president; Mr. Oosterling, secretary; L. van der Meijde, financial secretary; J. Van der Meer, Treasurer and the Messrs. H. De Young, H. Van der Meyde and C. Bosje members on the Board of Trustees.

    Thursday evening, the members of the "Roseland Sick Benefit Society," held a meeting at the home of Mr. Otto, 10928 Michigan Avenue. The following officers were chosen: Jos. Fisher, president; ...

    Dutch
    II D 1
  • Onze Toekomst -- February 09, 1906
    Zelf Hulp

    The report of that society shows that it is in a prosperous condition. Zelf Hulp is one of the few Dutch societies, which has attained a large measure of prosperity. From its founding in 1879, it now counts more than 11,000 members. Notwithstanding the fact that last year more than $9,000.00 was paid out in death benefits, the treasury is in good condition. But we especially draw your attention to the coming annual meeting, when the election of officers must take place. We should not say: "The business is good, it will continue so without me." All those who have the right to vote, should be there.

    Even though the business is going well and on the level, now, your absence could be the cause of the administration of the society falling into hands that are bad. We are loath to imagine such a thing, but it cannot be denied that such a possibility exists. The well being of "Zelf Hulp" depends on the executives who handle the business in the right way, and a Board of Directors, which has the good of the society at heart and does not consider time and trouble too costly to give for the good of all. For this reason, whatever your plans may have been, let these words awaken you, not to stay at home, 2but by your presence show that you have the interest of the society at heart. Then vote for officers as well as directors; for men whom you know, that they may have the interest of the society and your interest at heart and apply it consciencitiously. The following items prove the increasing prosperity of the society, which makes further proof unnecessary. Death benefits paid: In 1880, $ 39.00; 1885, $622.00; 1890, $2,415.00; 1895, $5,362.50; 1900, $7,215.00; 1905, $8,720.00. The total death benefits paid during the twenty-seven years of existence of the society amounted to $109,031.50.

    The report of that society shows that it is in a prosperous condition. Zelf Hulp is one of the few Dutch societies, which has attained a large measure of prosperity. ...

    Dutch
    II D 1, I D 2 b
  • Onze Toekomst -- March 02, 1906
    The Death of Father Van De Laar

    The Rev. Van de Laar, Pastor of the St. Patrick's Roman Catholic parish, died last Thursdat in Mercy Hospital, at the age of sixty. A dragging ailment put an end to his life. Pastor Van de Laar was born in the Netherlands, where he studied for the priesthood, and was inducted in office according to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1875 he came to America, mainly for the purpose of working among the strayed Dutch Catholics. Soon, however, he saw for himself a much larger field of labor. In 1880 he was appointed as assistant preacher in St. Columbkill parish, Grand Avenue and Paulina Street. A few months later he went to South Chicago to take charge of the St. Patrick parish, then only a mission station in a place called Ainsworth that is now known as South Chicago, From that time up to the time of his death, he was leader of that parish which, under his leadership, flourished and became a large and strong parish from which fourteen other parishes sprouted, so that South Chicago, at the present time, counts no less than fifteen Catholic parishes. Pastor Van de Laar was an industrious servant of the Catholic gospel, who applied all his strength and ability to the good of the parish. The funeral services took place Monday morning in the Church of his parish, attended by Archbishop Quigley. High Mass was said by 2Bishop Muldoon. As in life, so was he also in death, a commoner. In his will he asked that his body be not transported in a hearse, but in a street-car and also that those who attended his funeral should not ride in hired carriages but should follow him in street-cars to the grave. This wish was faithfully carried out. The funeral procession went via the Calumet Electric and Union Traction Company's lines to Mount Olivet, where interment took place. The reason he had made this stipulation in his last testament, was to set an example for others, especially for those of small means, who often have costly funerals far above the financial means of the family. Pastor Van de Laar had often signified his dislike for such costly funerals, and had made it plain that a funeral procession per street-car, served the purpose just as well if not better, than the method now generally followed.

    The Rev. Van de Laar, Pastor of the St. Patrick's Roman Catholic parish, died last Thursdat in Mercy Hospital, at the age of sixty. A dragging ailment put an end ...

    Dutch
    IV
  • Onze Toekomst -- March 06, 1906
    [Young People's Societies Celebrate]

    On the occasion of the yearly celebration of the boys' and girls' societies of 111th Street, D. W. Jellema, president of the Boys' Society, was presented with a beautiful blanket on which was embroidered the names of about six hundred members of the First Christian Reformed Congregation.

    The blanket was made by the members of the Girls' Society.

    On the occasion of the yearly celebration of the boys' and girls' societies of 111th Street, D. W. Jellema, president of the Boys' Society, was presented with a beautiful blanket ...

    Dutch
    III C, III E
  • Onze Toekomst -- March 23, 1906
    Rev. W. Greve

    Monday noon, the last remains of the 70 year old minister, the Rev. William Greve, were entrusted to the earth in Mount Greenwood cemetary. He was known by nearly every Dutchman in Chicago, loved by many, and honored by everyone who knew him. It was a solemn moment. The 74 year old widow was the only one of the relations who was present at the interment. But what the couple missed on blood relations, was well compensated for by the large number of friends they had made. The church of the 71st Street congregation, where the funeral services were held, was filled by those interested in rendering to the Rev. Greve their last respects. The services at the home were led by the Rev. Poppen, one of the most trusted friends of the deceased, and at the church speeches were made in the order given by the Pastors Van Dellen, Breen, Einink, Kuiper and Van Uliet, while at the grave the Rev. Van Dellin leddin prayer. The Rev. Grave was born January 16, 1836, in the county of Bentheim, where his father, Willem Greve, was a gardener. Mr. Greve, the father, was financially able to give his children a good education, and they were taught in a school with the Bible, which at that time in Bentheim was the public school. From his childhood the young William felt a longing to study for the ministry, a longing which resulted in his conversion to God. His conversion and the manner of living he assumed through that, were the cause of his being cast aside by the family. Yes, even despised and banished.

    2

    Although his father was a religious man, true conversion was for him a strange business. The attempts made by the young man to become a minister were fruitless. This was the reason that he resolved to try his luck in the "New World". He journied to Cincinnati, where he had preached the gospel many tines before private or public gatherings, until, at last, the now deceased Rev. D. J. Van der Werp, provided funds for his education in the ministry. In 1869 he became a preacher. He served the following congregations in order, Chicago, Cincinnati, Passaic, N. J., Borculo, Mich, and Grandville Avenue, Grand Rapids, Mich. In both of the first mentioned congregations he served twice. Later, after a well earned rest, he served the congregation at Hull, Iowa. He was a man who wanted and had to work for, the cause of the gospel. The ministry was his life. This was also the reason he made so many friends. His most beloved place was Chicago. When he obtained his diploma, he first moved to Pella - Iowa, but his longing for Chicago was too great, He sold his possessions in Pella and went to live in this city, in restful Englewood, where he spent his last days. In the last few weeks of his life he suffered greatly from asthma and Brights disease which made an end to his life, may his remains rest in peace.

    Monday noon, the last remains of the 70 year old minister, the Rev. William Greve, were entrusted to the earth in Mount Greenwood cemetary. He was known by nearly every ...

    Dutch
    IV
  • Onze Toekomst -- April 06, 1906
    [Roseland General Dutch League Entertains]

    The division Roseland of the "General Dutch League" gave an entertainment Thursday, March 29, in the "Leandia Hall" with great success. More than two hundred persons were present and the program was liked by everyone. Every time the opportunity presents itself the Dutch American again feels that he has not forgotten the land and people and especially the language which he formerly called his own.

    And why should he forget them? He cannot know the history, the quality of the people, and the Dutch national institutions unless he is proud of them. The division expects to raise its membership to two hundred names.

    The division Roseland of the "General Dutch League" gave an entertainment Thursday, March 29, in the "Leandia Hall" with great success. More than two hundred persons were present and the ...

    Dutch
    III B 2, III H
  • Onze Toekomst -- April 06, 1906
    The Girl's Society of the First Christian Reformed Church

    This organization celebrated last Thursday evening, its annual feast in the church on 14th Street, a feast that will long be remembered. Everything went unusually well. The church was filled by those who were interested, and no wonder! This organization does something and does that something well. It numbers twenty-nine members and at least two hundred beneficiary members. Anyone can be a beneficiary member, who pays at least $1 per year. That this organization of young girls can and will work and is true to the motto, "He who gives to the poor, loans to the Lord," has been proved during the past year by the setting aside of $25, for the foreign mission. And this year it has set aside $200, for the same purpose. The donations pay for the support of two Indian children in the mission station, Rehoboth, N. M. That is indeed an example worthy of following. The administration of that Society consists of the Rev. E. Breen, Honorary President; H. Bos, President, Miss Annie Mensinger, Vice-President, Miss Nellie Huiner, Secretary, Miss Dina Balk, Treasurer, and Miss Hatty Balk, Librarian.

    This organization celebrated last Thursday evening, its annual feast in the church on 14th Street, a feast that will long be remembered. Everything went unusually well. The church was filled ...

    Dutch
    III E, III C, II D 10