The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 18, 1871
    [Bohemian Militia Company Will Be Formed]

    The Chicago Bohemians have received a patent from General Sheridan for the formation of a Bohemian militia company under Captain Max Kohn.

    The Chicago Bohemians have received a patent from General Sheridan for the formation of a Bohemian militia company under Captain Max Kohn.

    Bohemian
    III D, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 26, 1872
    [Bohemian Aid Committee Formed].

    The Chicago Bohemians resolved in a meeting to collect money for the support of their countrymen in Bohemia, who lost all they had through a terrible inundation during May 25th to 28th, and to forward it to the Aid Committee in Prague. At the meeting, immediately, about $250.00 was collected. An Aid Committee was formed consisting of:

    Cenek Duras, President

    Vaslav Kolzum, Vice President

    F. V. Ligro, Secretary

    Henry Horner, Treasurer.

    The Chicago Bohemians resolved in a meeting to collect money for the support of their countrymen in Bohemia, who lost all they had through a terrible inundation during May 25th ...

    Bohemian
    II D 10, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 31, 1874
    Czech Books.

    At the beginning of this year one of the German members of the library board of directors wrote to Mr. Vojta Naprstek, eminent leader of the Czech national party in Prague, and asked him for a list of books in the Czech language most suited for the public library here. The attention of Mr. Naprstek was called to the fact that we intended to make our library a cosmopolitan one, containing especially the best literary works of the nationalities represented in Chicago. This was the first time that a public library in American was attempting to acquire Czech literature and it was to be hoped that the leader of the Czech national party would take part in it.

    The letter remained unanswered - as well as a second one mailed three months later to the same address and the deduction was justified that even such eminent Czech leaders as Mr. Naprstek were indifferent to the mental needs of their compatriots in this country.

    2

    This deduction has lately been refuted through the arrival of a box of Czech books, which are stamped with the words, "Vojta Naprstek Napamatku" or "Americk Klub." As this consignment was not accompanied by any written message, we are unable to say if it is the result of a collection or the gift of an individual. Many of the books are well bound and over nine tenths of them have been published since 1860, thus no old junk.

    At the beginning of this year one of the German members of the library board of directors wrote to Mr. Vojta Naprstek, eminent leader of the Czech national party in ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 a, III H
  • Chicago Tribune -- May 09, 1876
    Yesterday's Proletarian Riot.

    The Bohemian and Polish laborers in the lumberyards in the southwest quarter of the city who were called on by the proprietors to accept $1.25 per day instead of $1.50 on account of the great depression in business, struck, and refused to work at the rate, as they had a right to do, But there were plenty of Germans, and Irish, and Americans destitute of employment who were glad to take the vacant places. But this enraged the strikers, who demanded $1.75 per day, and, under the influence of Communist demagogues, resolved that the other workmen should not be employed, but that they must be taken back at advanced wages, and they proceeded to mob both the workmen and the employers. A large proportion of these Bohemians had been idle during the winter months, as the bulk of the work consists of unloading vessels, sorting and piling lumber.

    2

    Their refusal to work, under these circumstances, and in the present hard times, was a folly which only ignorant men would commit, since, including their families, some 2,000 or 3,000 people are dependent on their employment at this season of the year. But since they have resorted to violence and an attempted interference with the right of other men to labor at any price they choose to accept, it is no longer a question of the policy of the strikers, but simply an emergency requiring the strong arms of authority to suppress quickly and summarily the mob-violence incited against it. There is at present truce between the strikers and the employers, but it has been obtained by a practical abandonment of work, and the terrorism which the strikers sought to establish virtually exists. The moral force of this must be broken, and the right of free men to free labor established beyond the reach of menace.

    The Bohemian and Polish laborers in the lumberyards in the southwest quarter of the city who were called on by the proprietors to accept $1.25 per day instead of $1.50 ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 4, I D 2 a 4
  • Chicago Tribune -- August 09, 1877
    Bohemians.

    A second meeting of the Bohemians was held last evening at the Bohemian Hall. The meeting was quite large and composed of better material than such gatherings usually are. The object of the meeting seemed to be to calmly discuss the result of the late riots and to better unite the lumber-shovers, and give some expression in defense of the Bohemian nationality from the aspersions cast upon them in the late troubles. Numerous speeches were made accusing the papers of blamming them for the riots and censuring them as a class, which charges the speakers resented with great earnestness. They maintained that the Bohemians are peacable, law-abiding citizens, and that of the 25,000 in the city a smaller portion had been convicted of crime than any other class. Resolutions were adopted denouncing the papers for accusing them of leading and promoting the riots of two weeks ago. The meeting was devoid of enthusiasm, but from remarks not incendiary -occasionally dropped by a hot-headed speaker, it was evident, that the leaders of that nationality, at least, were ready to resent imaginary evils of any kind at any time, and to join the lumber-shovers or any other class, in a strike, let the consequences be what they may. The following resolution then was adopted.

    2

    "Resolved, that we protest against those calumnies thrown upon us Bohemians in Chicago during the past riotous days by our large dailies, the Tribune and the Times. We refer every fellow-citizen to the criminal statistics of the city of Chicago, which show that the Bohemian Nationality being represented here by at least 25,000 inhabitants, furnish proportionality the least contingent of criminals and transgressors to the prisons and jails. And by these statistics we prove that those calumnies were base affronts to all the best citizens of Bohemian extraction, and we pronounce them a base lie.

    A second meeting of the Bohemians was held last evening at the Bohemian Hall. The meeting was quite large and composed of better material than such gatherings usually are. The ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 4, I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- August 12, 1877
    The Lumber-Shovers' Proposed Strike.

    If the lumber-shovers of Chicago carry out the threats they have previously made, they will strike to-morrow morning for higher wages and undertake to forcibly prevent others from taking their places, with the expectation of coercing their employees to accede to their demands. There are said to be 4,500 lumber-shovers in this city, mostly Bohemians, who were originally mostly all agricultural laborers, and who have abandoned their farm-work in the old country to undertake the harder work of lumber-shoving in Chicago. It may not be that all of them will strike; but the principles at issue are the same, whether 100 strike or the whole 4,500.

    There are two sides to this question, as to every other. There is no doubt that the labor of these men is very hard and toilsome. There is no doubt that their wages are low. Up to last year, they, had we believe, $1.50 per day.

    2

    In the present depressed condition of the lumber-market they receive but $1.25. They ought to get more, if possible, upon the principle that the laborer is worthy of his hire; but, if the business affords no more, and the market will furnish men who are willing to work at the current wages, then these striking Bohemians have no right to prevent them. They have the right to quit work. They have the right to ask what they please and to refuse to work until they get it; but they have no right to forcibly prevent other men from working $1.25, because they want an increase to $1.50. The settlement of this question, therefore depends on the ability of the lumber firms to obtain substitutes. If the market will not furnish men who are willing to work for the prevent wages, then the strikers will succeed in getting their advance. So far as the mere fact of striking is concerned, there is nothing censurable in their announcement. But, when they couple with it the distinct threat that they will not allow any other men to take their places, they not only transcent their rights in the premises, but, if they carry their threat into operation, immediately becomes liable to arrest and punishment under the State law of Illinois, passed last winter, affixing penalties for obstructing business.

    3

    The provisions of this law are so explicit, that the lumber-shovers will have no difficulty in ascertaining its meaning. And it may be added that the businessmen of this city, after the disastrous experiences of the past 2 or 3 weeks, are not in a temper to allow interferences with their business, nor are the authorities in a temper to allow any violent proceedings upon the part of a mob to stop labor. As long as those proposed strikers refrain from interference with business, no one will interfere with them. But the moment they commence to hinder others by force from working, they violate the law and will be persecuted accordingly.

    If the lumber-shovers of Chicago carry out the threats they have previously made, they will strike to-morrow morning for higher wages and undertake to forcibly prevent others from taking their ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 4
  • Svornost -- May 16, 1878
    Northwest Side Bohemians Meeting.

    Parents wishing to send children to the newly organized Bohemian Sunday School will hold a meeting at 250 Ruker Street, on Sunday May 19th, 1878, at 9:30 A.M.

    The purpose of the school is to teach the children the Bohemian language.

    Parents wishing to send children to the newly organized Bohemian Sunday School will hold a meeting at 250 Ruker Street, on Sunday May 19th, 1878, at 9:30 A.M. The purpose ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f
  • Svornost -- May 18, 1878
    The Bohemian Sharpshooters.

    Benevolent Society will hold their annual picnic on Sunday, May 26th, in beautiful Silver Leaf Grove, on 12th Street.

    Industrious preparations are being made to assure the success of the picnic in all respects. Bohemian sharpshooters cheerfully attend all picnics given by National societies and it is hoped that under these circumstances their favors will be repaid.

    Benevolent Society will hold their annual picnic on Sunday, May 26th, in beautiful Silver Leaf Grove, on 12th Street. Industrious preparations are being made to assure the success of the ...

    Bohemian
    II B 3, II D 1
  • Svornost -- May 18, 1878
    Rehearsal

    Rehearsal of "celebrated case" (Slavna Pravni Pre) at 8 o'clock tomorrow morning. Amateurs will kindly come to the stage at 7 o'clock in the evening as the play will start at 8 o'clock without delay.

    Fr. Kozak-Director.

    Rehearsal of "celebrated case" (Slavna Pravni Pre) at 8 o'clock tomorrow morning. Amateurs will kindly come to the stage at 7 o'clock in the evening as the play will start ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 1
  • Svornost -- May 22, 1878
    [Bohemian School Opened on North Side]

    Classes will begin study at the Bohemian School on the Northwest side this coming Sunday at 8:30 A.M. Parents having children registered for these classes will please send them on time.

    Those who wish to send their children but have not as yet registered will kindly come a little earlier.

    Thus far there are 39 boys and girls registered and among them is one girl of French parentage.

    Classes will begin study at the Bohemian School on the Northwest side this coming Sunday at 8:30 A.M. Parents having children registered for these classes will please send them on ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f