The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Svornost -- October 04, 1880
    Meeting in Regards to Eighth Ward School.

    Yesterday's meeting, called in the interests of the Bohemian English School of the 8th Ward, was fairly well-attended and it seemed apparent that this important matter still has some encouraging supporters.

    After a lengthy debate as to ways and means of keeping this school active, it was decided to let the entire matter rest in the hands of a committee composed of Mr. G. B. Reisl, Karl Soldat, Hrejsy, Karl Novak, and Fr. Dvorak.

    The committee reported the following resolution which was accepted.

    "We, citizens of the 8th ward, gathered in a mass meeting, recognizing the importance and need of a Bohemian-English Liberal School promise to do all in our power to maintain and provide for it.

    Further be it resolved to invite all national lodges and societies which still honorably consider themselves Bohemian societies to be of help to us to the utmost of their ability, and that they should elect to the committee their own representatives."

    2

    It was further resolved to hold another meeting next Sunday and the meeting then adjourned.

    The committee held a short conference and decided to begin work without further delay. Today and tomorrow the notices will have been sent out and it is hoped that the various lodges and societies will give them consideration as soon as possible and make some sort of a decision in regards to them.

    Yesterday's meeting, called in the interests of the Bohemian English School of the 8th Ward, was fairly well-attended and it seemed apparent that this important matter still has some encouraging ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, I A 1 a, III B 4
  • Svornost -- October 09, 1884
    Citizens Without Representation (Editorial)

    The Catholic newspaper, the True Witness, edited in Chicago at 168 E. Randolph Street, gives an article in its last October copy about us Bohemians. This article was written by a certain W. Mungavin, and is worthy to be given notice, especially, as in contrast with the libelous article published not long ago in the Protestant missionary report of the local missionary society. We print a copy of this article below in full.

    Dear Editor, taking cognizance of your independence as regards political problems, with your permission, I intend to bring before the public the terrible injustice that is constantly being perpetrated over a highly honorable, law-abiding and industrious race. The Bohemian-Americans are taking an important part among the numerous nationalities that compose the population of Chicago. The last published school census shows that the Bohemians hold fourth place in Chicago's population. Besides they are pronounced as the most temperate, frugal and diligent citizens among all foreign nationalities. Consequently their number and respectability 2entitles them to be accordingly represented, not only in state and county offices, but in national offices as well. They pay us political attention to corrupt professional politicians, and every impartial citizen should consider that because of their honorable behavior they should be represented in local and national governmental offices. The injustices practiced against the Bohemian-Americans in our city is purely aggression. This evil is worse in some specific wards and districts. Ward sixth is an example of what I mean. In this ward the Bohemian element surpasses every other nationality in the proportion of four to one. Notwithstanding their numerical and material majority they have not even a district senator, alderman or representative. There is no other nationality which would submit so long to such a situation. The author of this article is convinced that there was another cause for this prolonged injustice and not only the restrictive activity of the politicians. After many inquiries I have found that jealousy among the societies helped very much to create the 3differences which were exploited very successfully by the politicians.

    Now an entirely new spirit reigna over the Bohemians, they are uniting with the purpose of self-preservation and of representation.

    The last Sokol convention held here in Chicago had very beneficial consequences. All existing disagreements, which were in the way of the development of different societies, now are resolved fortunately, and the Bohemian-Americans will work hand in hand for a prosperous future. They soon will make good and turn aside the scorn, sticking to the nation without the representation. I hope their efforts will be crowned with a complete victory. I remain,

    Respectfully,

    (Signed) Wm. Mungavin.

    The Catholic newspaper, the True Witness, edited in Chicago at 168 E. Randolph Street, gives an article in its last October copy about us Bohemians. This article was written by ...

    Bohemian
    I C, III B 4, I F 6
  • Svornost -- November 25, 1892
    Congress of Bohemian National Committee.

    Representatives of half a million Bohemian-Americans, to whom was entrusted the difficult but meritorious task of gaining honor for the name of Bohemians among other nationalities settled in this part of world, opened their Second Annual Convention yesterday afternoon at three o'clock, in the hall of C. A. Svob. Skola, (Bohemian American Liberal School) on 18th Street for the purpose of rendering an accounting of what has been done during the last year in the interest of Bohemian-Americans. That the committee would not please all members could have been fore-told from the very beginning. Some people appeared, who thought that the committee accomplished very little and charged its members with unconcern, unfitness, and other bad habits. But these people accuse and judge everything done by others; in the meantime they themselves are lacking in activity.

    2

    These unrecognized prophets would rather see every advantage gained by the people fall apart in ruin, rather than recognize the efforts of others. Truly, it would be nice if our committee was entirely composed of "Jonas's and Capeks" the chronicle of the committee's accomplishments would then appear differently, but we must remember that we are in America and not in Bohemia.

    Our Intelligentsia is yet small, and we must be content temporarily with those who willingly bind themselves to the difficult task, and from that viewpoint they are deserving of the thanks and gratitude of the rest of our people.

    Representatives of half a million Bohemian-Americans, to whom was entrusted the difficult but meritorious task of gaining honor for the name of Bohemians among other nationalities settled in this part ...

    Bohemian
    III B 4
  • Chicago Tribune -- July 07, 1893
    Bohemian-Amercans' Annual Delegates Decide to Continue the Publication of Official Organ

    The third annual session of the Bohemian-American National Committee opened yesterday morning at 10 o'clock in the Bohemian-American Hall, 400 West Eighteenth Street. President L. J. Palda of this city presided. The day was taken up with the reading of the minutes of the last session and the presentation of reports of the Correspondence Bureau and Emigration and Statistics Committee and closed with a discussion on the continuance of the organ, Bohemian Voice, published in Omaha. It was finally decided to continue the publication.

    The Bohemian National Committee represents, through its various societies in America, 3,000,000 Bohemians. The principal object of the Committee is to represent the Bohemians before the Americans as they are, and further to collect statistics of Bohemian immigration and present the situation to the people in Bohemia who are struggling for home rule. To-day will be taken up with the reading of committee reports.

    2

    The Closing Session

    The closing session of the Bohemian-American National Committee was held yesterday. Peter V. Rovmianek of Pittsburg opened the morning session with an address on the "Progress of the Bohemian Nation." Paul Albiera, a playwrite and author of Prague, Bohemia, in a short speech declared his intention on his return home of writing a history of America in the Bohemian language, that his countrymen might know more of the land to which so many of his people have immigrated. Mrs. R. L. Pitte of Chicago, President of the Bohemian Women's Benevolent Association, which has a membership of 4,000, delivered a short address, in which she assured the National Committee that the Association which she represented was ready to lend moral and financial support to any object which would tend to elevate the Bohemian nation.

    Upon a motion of Peter V. Bovmianek, it was unanimously decided to hold a Slavonic Congress in the future, in which will participate Bohemians, Poles, South Slavonians, and Russians. The congress will take place in Chicago on some day memorial to the history of the Slavonic race. The afternoon was taken up with the biennial election of officers.

    The third annual session of the Bohemian-American National Committee opened yesterday morning at 10 o'clock in the Bohemian-American Hall, 400 West Eighteenth Street. President L. J. Palda of this city ...

    Bohemian
    III B 4, III G, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 04, 1900
    The Twenty-Fifth Anniversary of Abbot Yaeger

    P.6--On the occasion of his twenty-fifth anniversary as pastor, the Reverend John Nepomuk Yaeger has received congratulations and best wishes from every State of the Union. All the clergy who attended the convention of the Bohemian Clerical Society presented themselves at St. Procopius' Abbey to extend, personally, their good wishes to the Reverend Father Yaeger. He also received delegations from various Catholic societies and communities. Speaking for the Bohemian Catholic clergy of America, the Reverend William Choker addressed Father Yaeger.

    On behalf of St. Procopius' parish Albert Kakulska, chairman of the church committee, extended congratulations. John Belko conveyed the good wishes of the First Catholic Union of America. The church will honor Father Yaeger at 9 o'clock this morning, followed later by a banquet at the abbey.

    P.6--On the occasion of his twenty-fifth anniversary as pastor, the Reverend John Nepomuk Yaeger has received congratulations and best wishes from every State of the Union. All the clergy who ...

    Bohemian
    IV, III C, III B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 01, 1900
    The Bohemian National Convention.

    p. 5.. The sessions of the "Bohemian National Convention of the First Bohemian Catholic Association of America," held in Chicago, came to a close yesterday. The Bohemians of our city found this an appropriate occasion for a celebration. Every prominent Bohemian was present at the festival. An address was delivered by Mayor Harrison in the evening.

    The festivities commenced in the morning with services at the Bohemian St. Vitus Church. The parade held in the afternoon surpassed any other they have held previously. Seated in coaches were twelve delegates who came from various parts of the country. The parade moved along the West Side streets to its place of destination, the Bohemian hall Cesko America Slovanska, at 18th Street. Mr. Zindrich Zitusk, was marshal of the parade. Every Bohemian Society of the city was well represented....

    Mayor Harrison was enthusiastically welcomed when he stepped upon the speaker's platform to deliver his address. He said: "With the exclusion of Prag, Chicago is the largest Bohemian city in the world. It often was said, that the American nation is identified with the Anglo-Saxon race. But Chicago disproved that nonsensical assertion. Represented in our city is every nation and every 2race. They are the real builders of Chicago. The Bohemians can justly claim their share of this fine work. Chicago is a typically American city, well known for its hospitality, and as such it extends its welcome to the Bohemian citizens."...

    Officials elected at the convention are the following: President, Vaclav Jirousek, Chicago; vice-president, John Perlo, Chicago; secretary, John Stukbauer, Cleveland; secretary of finances, I. J. Wolf, St. Louis; treasurer, John Bozovsky, Chicago. The elected directors are: Matthias Brichcek, Chicago; Josef Cihak, Baltimore and John Capek, New York.

    p. 5.. The sessions of the "Bohemian National Convention of the First Bohemian Catholic Association of America," held in Chicago, came to a close yesterday. The Bohemians of our city ...

    Bohemian
    III B 4, III C, III B 2
  • Denní Hlasatel -- August 04, 1904
    Meeting of Representatives of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association.

    A meeting of the representatives of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association was held yesterday in the lower hall of the Bohemian American Liberal School on 18th. St. The attendance at the meeting was very small, apparently the result of the convention of the C. S. P. S. (Czechoslovak Benevolent Society) being held in St. Louis, which is being attended by many members of the Association. The meeting was called to order at 8 p. m. by the vice-chairman Mr. Mencl. The secretary Mr. Josef Filip read the minutes of the previous meeting, which were accepted as read. The financial secretary, Mr. Husak, read the bills payable of the Association, they were all ordered paid, though there was some discussion about several of them. Finally everything was explained and the meeting proceeded to further business. The secretary, Mr. Filip, brought before the meeting two Bohemian Women who requested free graves for their children. They were Mrs. Marie Kunrad, requesting a grave for her fifteen year old daughter Marie and Mrs. Braun, who asked for a grave for her two and one-half year old child. These requests were unanimously granted, whereupon, after thanking the members of the Association the women withdrew from the meeting.

    2

    Communications were then read. J. Meduna requested that he be taken back to work as he has been unable to find anything else since he was discharged. In his letter he complained that he had been discharged because of pressure by certain individuals. A prolonged debate on the matter ensued. The Gardner, Mr. Ine, explained that there were too many people employed on the Cemetery and that it was necessary to dismiss someone. That was the reason for the discharge of J. Meduna. Representative Rehak interceded, and explained that Meduna should be re-employed, because he is a member of the Liberal Community, and of the Knights and Ladies, and that should be given consideration. Also Representative Pospisk in speaking of the matter expressed his surprise, that there were several persons employed by the Cemetery who do not belong to any of the lodges. He knows that several lodge members applied for employment but it was not given to them. The Gardner explained the matter from his viewpoint, and convinced the representatives, that it is necessary to employ only capable people whether or not they belong to any lodge. In that respect Representative Masak agrees with him and requests that such matters be turned over to the managing committee, Finally a motion was adopted that such matters be left to the managing committee for consideration.

    3

    Mr. Bozovsky, the treasurer of the Old Peoples Home, sent to the National Cemetery Association a check for $1,000. This is the eighth thousand and it would be desirable it it were the eightieth for the Home's money is well taken care of by the Cemetery Association. Bids were received for furnishing coal to the Cemetery. Four bids were received namely from V. Roubal George Lill Company, Wilston Coal Company and Scully and Kostner Company. A lengthy and lively debate followed regarding the bids, but all of the representatives wereunanimous that the contract be given to a Bohemian firm. Gardener Ine was asked for his recommendation as to the quality of the coal, proposed, that nine carloads be ordered, half and half of the so called Indiana block and new river Pocahontas. Representative Rehak, proposed that the lowest bid be accepted, that of Scully and Kostner, which was protested against by treasurer Jurka, who maintained that it is not always smart to buy that which is offered cheapest, without investigating the quality offered.

    4

    Finally the low bid of Scully and Kostner of $3.35 per ton for New River Pocahontas was accepted. Reports of the auditing committee were made. The committee examined the books and the entries of Bonds, everything was found in order. Also the accounting committee announced that the bequest of $300 by the deceased Mrs. Barta will be paid over to the Association as soon as possible after the matter is settled by the Probate Court. The treasurers report for the past six months was then read. It is interesting that the wealth of the National Cemetery increased about $20,000 during the past six months.

    The following report for the month of July was then read. Receipts:

    Payments on lots $1,070.35
    Flowers for Graves 291.25
    Raising of Graves 13.00
    History 3.00
    Floral pieces 296.50
    Foundations 671.90
    Graves in rows (small) 110.00
    Graves in rows (large) 48.00
    Lots small 20.00
    Lots large 93.00
    5
    Telephone .60
    Misc. .50
    Total $2,618.10
    Balance on hand from previous 2,355.24
    4,973.34
    Disbursements 2,233.57
    Balance in treasury $2,739.77

    During July, eight lots valued at $1,060 were sold. Sixty-eight corpses were buried- one free of charge. Two hundred fourteen dollars and seven cents was deposited in the reserve fund. After several less important decisions the meeting was adjourned.

    A meeting of the representatives of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association was held yesterday in the lower hall of the Bohemian American Liberal School on 18th. St. The attendance at ...

    Bohemian
    III C, III B 4, II D 1
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 03, 1906
    Open Meeting of the C. S. P. S. (Czecho-Slovak Benevolent Societies) Crowned with Great Success.

    p.1--The Chicago lodges of the powerful C. S. P. S. organization held a public meeting on Sunday afternoon which in every respect revealed the dignity of this powerful national body.

    The meeting was opened at 2 o'clock in the Bohemian-American School's hall on Eighteenth street with a welcoming address by Mr. Kristian Walleck, after which a richly varied program was presented, consisting of speeches, band music, and singing.

    The principal speaker was Mr. A. Cejka, chairman of the national office of the C. S. P. S.

    Dr. F. Iska, Mr. Novak, and others also spoke. Mr. R. Rubringer's orchestra, Miss Bessie Egermayer, the Bohemian Working-men's Singing Society, and Mr. Sulz furnished the musical portion of the program with great success.

    2

    Mr. F. K. Novak received a well deserved reward at this meeting for securing the largest number of new members in this last year. The meeting was a grand affair and a real manifestation of the C. S. P. S.

    p.1--The Chicago lodges of the powerful C. S. P. S. organization held a public meeting on Sunday afternoon which in every respect revealed the dignity of this powerful national body. ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1, II B 1 a, III B 4
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 11, 1907
    Foresters' Convention

    P.1--Yesterday's session of the Union of Bohemian-American Foresters convened as usual. At 9 A. M. sharp the minutes of the previous meeting were read, followed by letters of well-wishers. Next the regular business was discussed till noon. The meeting then adjourned till 2 P. M.

    The afternoon session was attended by all the delegates. The minutes of the morning session were read and approved of. Next the committee on resolutions rendered its reports, which were also accepted. Thereafter a report was made by the accounting or financial committee. Then a report which suggested certain changes in the by-laws of this organization was submitted by a special committee. A vote was taken concerning the changes in the bylaws, all of which were approved of printed copies of the proceedings of the convention and the proposed and accepted changes in the by-laws were then forwarded to the Grand Lodge for reference.

    The remainder of the afternoon was spent in the election of new officers for the Grand Lodge, the majority of whom were prominent Bohemian men. The 2officers were elected to serve for a term of three years.

    Before the meeting was adjourned, the newly appointed officers each gave a brief speech, and the convention closed at 6 P. M.

    P.1--Yesterday's session of the Union of Bohemian-American Foresters convened as usual. At 9 A. M. sharp the minutes of the previous meeting were read, followed by letters of well-wishers. Next ...

    Bohemian
    III B 4, II D 1
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 14, 1907
    Convention of Freethinking Czechs Called to Order Yesterday Morning in the Bohemian-American Free Thought School on 18th Street

    Shortly after nine o'clock yesterday morning, Mr. Frank B. Zdrubek, chairman of the convention committee, declared the convention of Bohemian-American Freethinkers opened. Dr. Frank Iska, chairman of the executive committee, took the floor and in a lengthy talk explained to those present the real purpose of the convention. He also requested of them energetic work and regular attendance. On the motion of Mr. Rosicky, Mr. Zdrubek appointed a rules committee for the convention, and at the same time a permanent committee. Mr. Zdrubek named Messrs. Cejka, Bunata, Hollman, Rosicky, Kirchner, Rehak, and Eggermayer, Dr. Iska, Mrs. Rokuska, Mrs. Ruzicka and Mrs. Rychlik. Dr. Iska was not appointed to the committee until after Mrs. Ruzicka had made a motion that Mr. Zdrubek be also included in the committee. A minor debate ensued, which was ended when Dr. Iska announced his willingness to serve as a member 2of the committee. Mr. Pech moved that the committee be enlarged to fourteen members, which motion was accepted. While the committee was in consultation, the reports of various committee secretaries were heard.

    The secretary of the convention committee, Mr. Rudolph Janda, asked forgiveness for not being able to submit a more detailed report. Because of the great amount of work in connection with the convention, he was unable to complete the report until yesterday morning, or just before the convention opened. From his reports we select the following items: A total of 419 circular letters were sent to various lodges; in addition Mr. Janda sent out several hundred letters to newspaper and to Czech Freethinkers in Prague, whose representative, Dr. Bartosek, is present at the convention. In naming the newspapers which wrote in favor of the convention and those which made evident their disagreement with the holding of it, Mr. Janda did not forget to cast insinuations at Denni Hlasatel; but we consider his remarks the result of a somewhat faulty memory and of an underestimation of our reports. Mr. Janda certainly would not tell a deliberate untruth, because he knows that it would 3not be dignified for a truly enlightened person to do so. He was thanked by the chairman for the work he had accomplished for the convention.

    A report was then given by the secretary of the executive committee, Mr. Tupy, who sent out a total of 1094 circulars, and wrote thirty-five pages of minutes while attending nine meetings. His report was received with thanks by the chairman of the convention.

    Congratulatory letters and telegrams from many individuals and lodges were read.

    At the request of the chairman, Dr. Bartosek spoke a few words. There is not the least doubt that Dr. Bartosek is a highly educated man; therefore, it is no wonder that his remarks were followed attentively. After Dr. Bartosek, whose words were received with stormy applause, Dr. Vojan of New York spoke.

    4

    In the meantime the committee returned, and its chairman, delegate Cejka, announced the result of its deliberations. The committee resolved to recommend the election of one chairman, three vice-chairman, two secretaries, two recorders and one treasurer for the convention. Morning sessions are to begin at 9:00 A.M., afternoon sessions at 1:30 P.M. Pertinent motions are to be submitted in writing, formal motions may be made orally. The member making the motion is to be allowed ten minutes' time to substantiate his motion, and debate on the motion is to be limited to five minutes. The rules for the convention as worked out by the committee were accepted.

    To the committee which will have to establish contact with the Free Thought societies of other nationalities all over the world, were named the following: Walleck, Iska, Kral, Jicinsky, Zdrubek, Rosicky, Cejka, Dr. Vojan and Dr. Vistelny.

    The chairman announced that the committees would retire for conference and that the convention stood adjourned.

    5

    The afternoon session was far from harmonious. Not only were unpleasant scenes enacted, but the entire success of the convention was threatened. Several of the delegates evidently thought that the convention had been called for the purpose of affording them an opportunity to settle old hatreds, and they acted accordingly. They seemed to forget how those people who had traveled great distances, urged on by a desire to work conscientiously, would look upon such quarrels.

    The chairman, Mr. Pech, brought the meeting to order at 1:30 P.M. Several congratulatory letters were read. After the communications received had been read, the secretary read the minutes of the morning session. Dr. Iska then explained the absence of the treasurer, Mr. Charvat. The treasurer, however sent in his report, from which it appears that he received a total of $1748.51 and paid out $262.31, leaving a balance of $1486. 20. Upon a motion by Dr. Iska, it was resolved that the chairman appoint an auditing committee, the members of which he is to name today. Mr. Kirchner resigned as secretary because he was elected also to the resolutions committee and 6wished to remain on it. Mr. Hulik was elected to the vacancy by acclamation.

    Dr. Iska announced that some good workers had been overlooked when the committees were elected, and he moved that the chairman be given the privilege of enlarging the committees by appointing additional members, especially those who applied. A protest was raised against such procedure; Mr. Polacek, Mr. Rehak and Dr. Radesinsky protested, asking for more active work rather than more committees. Mrs. Klaus remarked that the convention had been called to do some work, and not to satisfy a few personal ambitions.

    After much debate, Dr. Iska was selected as the speaker for the evening session, and the afternoon session adjourned.

    In the evening a public meeting was held, at which Dr. Iska, Mr. L. Palda, Dr. Bartosek, and several other people spoke. This meeting was presided over by delegate Holman.

    7

    The convention will be called to order again at 9:00 o'clock today.

    Shortly after nine o'clock yesterday morning, Mr. Frank B. Zdrubek, chairman of the convention committee, declared the convention of Bohemian-American Freethinkers opened. Dr. Frank Iska, chairman of the executive committee, ...

    Bohemian
    III B 4, IV, III H, III C, II B 2 d 1