The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- June 27, 1879
    The Bohemian Sharpshooters

    The Bohemian Sharpshooters are not improving their case by the examination before Judge McAllister, which is to determine the question of admitting them to bail pending the determination of the fate of the worst wounded of the men fired upon.

    The testimony thus far taken mitigates in no degree the atrocity of emptying loads of buckshot into a crowd of unoffending spectators at short range, for it appears that none of those hit were connected with the disorderly demonstrations which the Bohemians set up in palliation of their offense. The facts developed in the examination are such that the prisoners may count themselves extremely fortunate if no death results from their picnicking. And it would be to their interest if some kind friend could prevail upon the Socialist orators not to organize sympathetic mass-meetings for the sake of delivering themselves of savage and inflammatory speeches.

    The Bohemians were in the wrong in using their muskets murderously, and their position will not be improved by the kind of talk indulged in at last night's meeting.

    The Bohemian Sharpshooters are not improving their case by the examination before Judge McAllister, which is to determine the question of admitting them to bail pending the determination of the ...

    Bohemian
    I E, III B 2
  • Svornost -- July 17, 1879
    [Sokol Celebration]

    Damsky S'Bor Vlasta Cislo I (Vlasta Woman's Club No. 1) held a celebration yesterday in Telocyicne Jednota Sokol (Sokol Gymnastic Union) Hall in commemoration of the birth of the great Bohemian teacher and nationalist, Josef Jakob Jungmann.

    Mrs. Kl. Novak opened the session with an appropriate address referring to the deathless memory of Josef Jungmann, after which Miss Alb. Fligl gave a biographical lecture on this celebrated genius of ours, calling especial attention to all that Josef Jungmann did for Bohemian nationality. Several more short talks followed. Every speaker was applauded.

    It is to the honor of the Woman's club that it never forgets to honor the memory of those who merit remembrance. Toward midnight the ladies served a delightful supper. The entertainment was informal, and there were dancing and singing. It is to be regretted that so few young men attended.

    Damsky S'Bor Vlasta Cislo I (Vlasta Woman's Club No. 1) held a celebration yesterday in Telocyicne Jednota Sokol (Sokol Gymnastic Union) Hall in commemoration of the birth of the great ...

    Bohemian
    III B 2, III A, III H, II B 2 g, II B 1 c 3
  • Svornost -- April 25, 1881
    Czecho-Slovak Orphanage

    The"Pilsen" Literary Society, which has of late been revived, and whose numbers take great pleasure in discussing and advancing all important matters of community interest, called a meeting of citizens last Saturday. The purpose of the meeting was to decide whether or not a Czecho-Slovak Orphanage in the United States, about which there has been much said in the public press, should be founded.

    The attendance at the meeting was very small and if we were not aware of the great dislike of our countrymen for anything that has the semblance of a meeting called for charitable purposes, we would be compelled to think that such a noble, philanthropic thought has no adherents among Chicago Bohemians.

    The meeting was brought to order by the Literary Society's chairman, Mr. Lajer, who explained the purpose of the meeting. Mr. C. Hloucal, was secretary of the meeting.

    We must express our regret over the fact, that with the exception of the true Nationalist, our old Mr. Svoboda, all the speakers were in opposition 2to the founding of the Orphanage. The discussion was lively and interesting and deviated from the main subject toward the end: that is, to the discussion of whether or not the Bohemian Nationalistic Ideals should be upheld in America. After a lengthy debate the following resolutions were adopted:

    (1) That the expenses involved in maintaining an Orphanage are so great, that it is impossible for Chicago Bohemians to attend to the building of a National Orphanage.

    (2) We urge all Benefit and Nationalistic Societies to provide for the public care of orphans in all cities.

    (3) That for the preservation of our Nationality it is an unavoidable necessity, first of all, to found Bohemian Schools, both daily and Sunday; and we further urge National Societies in other cities where there are no Bohemian Schools, to take necessary steps for their founding.

    The"Pilsen" Literary Society, which has of late been revived, and whose numbers take great pleasure in discussing and advancing all important matters of community interest, called a meeting of citizens ...

    Bohemian
    II D 4, II B 2 g, III A, III B 2, II B 2 f, II B 1 d
  • Svornost -- January 06, 1890
    Jan Hus Memorial

    On the premises of the Bohemian-English Liberal School on 18th Street, there was held a meeting yesterday afternoon, at which time a report was made by the temporary committee on preliminary arrangements for the purpose of providing a suitable memorial for our national martyr, Jan Hus.

    The objective which some of our citizens have decided upon is surely noble and it is regretted that many of our prominent citizens who could effectively work for the accomplishment of this purpose have thus far remained aloof. We hope that the present movement will not die out before the purpose is definitely accomplished.

    The meeting was brought to order by the temporary chairman, Mr. J. Vilimovsky and the committee-shairman, Mr. J.V. Matejka reported on previous efforts of the committee. He also mentioned the sending of telegrams to Bohemia and recommended the appointment of a permanent committee and a committee for the collection of contributions and the issuance of a suitable proclamation to be published in the English papers.

    2

    The report was accepted, following which there developed a debate as to the best method to establish a permanent committee. Citizen Pondelicek moved that our various lodges be requested to send delegates, as only in that manner would the objective be successfully carried out, when the committee is set up as is the committee for the construction of the memorial to the Bohemian Veterans. The motion was resisted by citizen Matejka, who asked that the committee be appointed immediately. The majority being in favor of this, there was named a committee of twenty-five. Some of the speakers advanced the opinion that if the fulfillment of the entire purpose were left up to our Liberal Thought Societies, the entire Bohemian population of Chicago would not be able to take part. We must differ with them.

    Our nationalistic efforts are centered in our Lodges--they are at the focus of our national life. Whatever good our Lodges have thus far accomplished, they have done for the benefit of all Chicago Bohemians--of this we have an example in the National Cemetery, and they would do likewise in this purpose.

    3

    The Lodges will have to be called on for aid in the matter eventually and it is our opinion that it would be very tactful, if we expect to receive any help from this source in the successful accomplishment of our objective, to invite them to work with us from the very beginning.

    Mr. F. Novak--contributed fifty dollars toward the memorial. Mr. Vanek, the secretary, gave some of those present credentials for the cellection of contributions and the gathering disbursed.

    On the premises of the Bohemian-English Liberal School on 18th Street, there was held a meeting yesterday afternoon, at which time a report was made by the temporary committee on ...

    Bohemian
    II C, III C, II D 1, III B 2
  • Svornost -- December 16, 1890
    New Gymnastic Club.

    To the numerous gymnastic associations in Chicago, there was added another unit, namely the Tel. Jed. Sokol Tabor (Gymnastic Union Sokol Tabor) located in New Tabor, in the Merigold Subdivion. The organization of a Gymnastic Society, in which would center the patriotic efforts of Bohemian men and Bohemian youth, has been the subject of discussion for some time in New Tabor. Last Sunday this idea was fulfilled. A meeting was announced, to take place in Pertl's hall on 12th St. and 41st. Ave., for the purpose of organizing a Gymnastic Society, and this was actually accomplished; taking the name Tel. Jed. Sokol Tabor, (Gymnastic Union Sokol Tabor). Eighteen members joined the new organization at once and from among themselves they chose temporary officers. It was resolved to hold a meeting next Sunday at 2 P. M., at which time regular officers are to be elected.

    2

    The membership fee, for the time being is to be $1.00. Bohemians of New Tabor, should show by joinging the newly organized Sokols, that they are not indifferent to the patriotic efforts that our Gymnastic Societies are supposed to cultivate.

    To the numerous gymnastic associations in Chicago, there was added another unit, namely the Tel. Jed. Sokol Tabor (Gymnastic Union Sokol Tabor) located in New Tabor, in the Merigold Subdivion. ...

    Bohemian
    II B 3, III A, III B 2
  • Svornost -- May 30, 1892
    [Germanizing of Bohemians]

    Although it is not the real "Prussian Schulverein" which exists within Chicago, it is a variety, a society organized more than half a year ago for the purpose of having Prussian and Austrian-Germans, in Bohemia and outside of Bohemia, support both materially and morally in the Germanization of everything which is not German. It is a society of immigrant Austrians, or in other words an "Austrian Society," which really issued the proclamation for the "Germans" to quickly and plentifully collect two-dollar contributions, because in Bohemia, "oppressed" countrymen are in need of a great deal of money and a great deal of encouragement to carry on the work with which the entire "Germanic Culture" is so concerned.

    So that our countrymen will know from the ground up what this famous "Schulverein" really is, we say that the task of this refined society is to force themselves boldly into Bohemian cities; to denationalize Bohemian children; as for instance, turn the children away from their mother tongue; encourage in them a hatred toward it, and everything which carries the name Bohemian; to teach them to deny their native origin; to deny the language of their mother and father. In this manner the children are to be brought up 2as traitors to their own nationality and join the ranks of the greatest enemies of the Bohemian people. The Bohemian child who enters the "German Schulverein" school will not and cannot learn. Everything is explained to him simply in the German tongue, about which the child has not the slightest idea; he doesn't understand a word and therefore cannot do well. The result of the teaching is that the child knows neither Bohemian nor German. Formerly we had no "Schulverein" and we learned German. For Bohemians to learn, for their own use and not for the convenience of the Germans, so much German as is necessary is their own affair - and let the Germans worry about again learning Bohemian. It is known that the Central Alma Mater in Bohemia and Moravia is working ardently in opposition to the "Schulverein." The influence of this genuine Bohemian patriotic society is a thorn in the eyes of the obstinate Germans and of the Bohemian traitors and renegrades. The Germans, being unable to battle effectively with the "Central Alma Mater" because of their greatly and continually dwindling means, have turned to the American "Austrians" for their financial support in the fight. As a result we have the "Austrian Society."

    For us American-Bohemians this fact is of great significance. Thus far we don't care about our particular national interests here in America, whereas 3the Germans in addition to supporting everything that concerns the local German element are helping to their utmost the struggle of their patriotic overseas-countrymen. Isn't this so?

    Under conditions such as exist among us we would not be surprised in the least if the "Austrian Society" mustered among its members several Bohemians also. The unknown attracts Bohemians, always and everywhere.

    Although it is not the real "Prussian Schulverein" which exists within Chicago, it is a variety, a society organized more than half a year ago for the purpose of having ...

    Bohemian
    I C, III B 2, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 30, 1892
    Inauguration of the First Bohemian Soldier Monument.

    At the Bohemian National Cemetery at Irving Park an important festival took place yesterday. The Bohemians of Chicago erected a monument to the memory of the Bohemian American soldiers, who had sacrificed their lives in the Civil War. This monument was unveiled yesterday. The Grand Army of the Republic displayed its splendor and magnificence. The festival attracted approximately five thousand Bohemian citizens. The monument is of large propostions. It is made of bronze, and represents a common soldier with full equipment.

    All those participating in the inaugural ceremony assembled at 10 A.M. at Dearborn and Adams Street and marched to the Northwestern Station. The procession consisted of the following sections:

    Police squad, under Sergeant Johnson, C. R. Lewis, Field-Marshal and his staff; Slavonian music band; Camp No. 1 of the Sons of Veterans; Veterans of the Whitier Post, Grant Post, S. H. Thomas Post, Lincoln Post, and S. A. Custer Post;

    2

    Eminent Citizens in carriages;

    Bohemian Veteran Soldiers and Sailors;

    Bohemian K. of P. No. 2;

    Bohemian Athletic Clubs;

    Knights of Charles IV;

    Bohemian Citizens Club;

    John Huss Lodge J. O. F.

    Bohemian Grand Lodge;

    Bohemian-Slavonian Society;

    Bohemian National Association,

    Radetz-Ky Veterans,

    Otto-Kar Division K. of P1,

    3

    Bohemian-American Glee Club. J. Sindelar officiated as marshall of the Bohemian Clubs, and A. J. Miksch as marshal of the veterans.

    At the cemetery these various civil and military organizations assembled, group-wise, in a circle around the monument. The Bohemian Glee Club rendered a song as a prelude to the ceremony. Then Miss A. L. Steiska presented a large American flag to the officials of the cemetery in the name of the Bohemian Glee Club. President Malouseck held a preliminary speech welcoming the visitors in general, and, Ex-Mayor Harrison in particular.

    The Vice Commander of the Illinois section of the Grand Army of the Republic, H. S. Dietrich made the inaugural speech. He pointed out how the Bohemian-American Citizens had been ready to follow the call of their adopted fatherland when the war broke out. This monument, he declared, is not only a monument to honor the dead heroes, but to teach all men, that this country has room only for one government and one flag.

    4

    When the veil was removed from the monument, shouts of applause came from thousands of voices. Three salutes with cannon were made thrice the flags were dipped, and the first Bohemian military monument was dedicated...

    At the Bohemian National Cemetery at Irving Park an important festival took place yesterday. The Bohemians of Chicago erected a monument to the memory of the Bohemian American soldiers, who ...

    Bohemian
    II C, I C, III D, III B 2, II B 1 c 3
  • Svornost -- September 07, 1896
    Grand Celebration Unveiling of the Flag by the Club Premysl No. 41.

    The Lodge #41 celebrated yesterday, starting at noontime, the unveiling of its new flag. The celebration was preceeded by an imposing parade to "Thalia Hall," corner 18th and Allport streets. The parade made a round of many streets between 18th and 20th and all the way different clubs and societies joined it. The parade was accompanied by fifteen carriages and coaches with mother, god-mother, maids and delegates. The celebration started with placing the flag and its mother, Mrs. Stuchlik, and its god-mother, Mrs. Ludvigova, in the place of honor.

    In the rear were located maids of honor and many flags of other clubs and societies.

    The celebration was opened by John Jurena, Pres. International Businessmen's Union, who greeted the present guests and introduced to them all officials of the club.

    2

    Several patriotic speeches were delivered, commemorating the dynasty of "Premysl," during whose rules as Kings of Bohemia, the country reached the highest development and prosperity. All Bohemians should be proud of their past history and always be true to this national flag, so much more - as it is the product of hard work of the Bohemian women's hands.

    The speaker of the celebration, F. B. Zdrubek, told the audience what the ideas of clubs and lodges, the fraternity and friendship of members united under the new flag - should be forever.

    Mutual help in industry and workmanship should be the main guiding idea of the Bohemian societies, especially those in Chicago, as the Bohemian community is in need of such cooperation. He appealed to all American Bohemians never to forget the real meaning of brotherhood. The new flag was then adorned with innumerable flowers and greeted by representatives of other societies.

    3

    After expiration of the celebration program delegates and guests danced continuing late into the night.

    The Lodge #41 celebrated yesterday, starting at noontime, the unveiling of its new flag. The celebration was preceeded by an imposing parade to "Thalia Hall," corner 18th and Allport streets. ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 3, III H, II D 1, III B 2
  • Svornost -- November 12, 1896
    The End of the Bohemian League.

    Yesterday evening there was called a meeting of representatives and patrons of the Bohemian League. The attendance was very scanty. Franz Kaspar opened the meeting.

    The question that was up for decision was should the League continue to exist or not. The majority of those present was unanimous that it is impossible to even think of the future existence of the League, in view of the surprising carelessness of the management of the whole enterprise.

    Mr. Kaspar suggested to read the letter of Mr. Lepsa; the letter firmly stated the activity of the League should not be discontinued and the money now in the treasury should be in no way used on any Bohemian-American enterprise but exclusively for the Bohemian cause; - the money could be loaned to northwest Bohemian tradesmen. The suggestionsof Mr. Lepsa were seen as humane and good - anyhow the opinion of the members who were in the League for a long time was that the resurrection of the League is impossible.

    2

    The masses of the Bohemian population are indifferent; nobody appears at the meetings; the Bohemian press never used propaganda through the League and, finally, the dishonesty of a few individuals soon shortened the life of this organization. It was then clear from the whole discussion of the present members that no one believed that the League could exist in the future.

    As a result of this decision the meeting started to deliberate on how to dispose of the cash in the League's possession.

    Mr. Cerveny, treasurer, declared there is in the treasury $370 or a little more. Suggestions for the dividing of the money were different; many members opposed the sending of the money to Bohemia. It was positively decided that the League absolutely must be closed as a unit and the day for this purpose was set for the first Sunday after New Year.

    Yesterday evening there was called a meeting of representatives and patrons of the Bohemian League. The attendance was very scanty. Franz Kaspar opened the meeting. The question that was up ...

    Bohemian
    III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 08, 1900
    The Bohemians

    Chicago's Bohemian Sokol societies met at Pilsen Hall last night in order to make arrangements for a publicity campaign. The Bohemians demand that their native language be taught in schools of those districts which are largely populated by the Bohemians. A committee composed of V. Donat, Cyril Fiola, Joseph Dusek, Frank Chyna, and John Klaus was entrusted with the designing of a petition which will be submitted to the Chicago School Board at its next session. According to the demands of the Bohemian people, the petition will require that in schools which are attended by at least 50 percent of children of Bohemian descent, the instruction of Bohemian should be seriously considered by the Board.

    It was rumored that the entire Bohemian population of Chicago is giving its support to this movement. Mass meetings to further the cause are supposed to take place throughout Chicago within the next few days. The Bohemians insist that they have as good a right to their demands as has the German element of this city.

    Chicago's Bohemian Sokol societies met at Pilsen Hall last night in order to make arrangements for a publicity campaign. The Bohemians demand that their native language be taught in schools ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 b, I C, I F 4, I F 3, II B 3, III B 2