The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 18, 1871
    [Bohemian Militia Company Will Be Formed]

    The Chicago Bohemians have received a patent from General Sheridan for the formation of a Bohemian militia company under Captain Max Kohn.

    The Chicago Bohemians have received a patent from General Sheridan for the formation of a Bohemian militia company under Captain Max Kohn.

    Bohemian
    III D, III A
  • Svornost -- June 25, 1878
    Local News

    The strike at Cooper's was ended after nine days. Hereafter, they are to receive 40 cents instead of 25 cents for making lard barrels.

    It would be well for all Bohemian coopers to join the union.

    The strike at Cooper's was ended after nine days. Hereafter, they are to receive 40 cents instead of 25 cents for making lard barrels. It would be well for all ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 3, III A, I D 2 a 4
  • Svornost -- September 09, 1878
    "Fourth Anniversary of Svornost"

    In the name of education and enlightenment for Chicago Bohemians we start the fourth volume of the daily newspaper "Svornost."

    On this day Chicago Bohemians should be thankful that it was possible to found and maintain a daily publication without feat of possible damage or injury; Bohemians in Europe even though they are nearer to the native land than we have not been able to do so. In Vienna, where live as many Bohemians as in almost all of America and where a daily paper is a national necessity, where they are surrounded only by the German elements to which they are accustomed since childhood, where it is not necessary for them to hide their nationality as here, they have been unable to maintain a fairweekly, let alone a daily publication.

    From a nationalistic viewpoint it is painful to note the decline and denationalization going on. In comparison here in far Western America, in a city where live scarcely 25,000 Bohemians, and these mostly of the kind who were not accustomed to reading daily newspapers, occurred the undertaking of a Daily-paper and it is 2worthily prospering. This newspaper was founded because of a pure love of Bohemian National Culture and for its elevation. Every Chicago citizen knows well, the kind of offering the publisher had to bring in the beginning, that the publisher has plenty to do to meet his obligations to the employees of the paper and at the same time take care of credit obligations from the first year of publication.

    For the past three years "Svornost" has served unselfishly in the interests of the Bohemians in Chicago and in America. They have been trying years. Because of conditions in general, we could not depend too much on support among our local countrymen, who in the majority are laborers of limited means and who must of necessity count every penny laid out for things other than food. We know many would gladly read our paper, but as they can just barely provide the absolute necessities of life, and being unable to find in their neighborhood one with whom they might jointly subscribe for the paper, they must do without. Even so we hope that the number of subscribers will continue to grow until we will be able to bring to our 3readers a better and larger paper than heretofore. The enlargement and improvement of our papers is our chief concern, but all must realize that this depends largely on the prepayment of subscriptions so that we may have an incentive to further effort. In the political field "Svornost" will remain as in the past independent. Our conception of political dependence is nothing other than slavery for pay.

    Svornost for the entire three years of its existence can not be rightfully accused of accepting payment to serve any political party. We will praise and support that which we think is good, generous, or useful, regardless of which party presents it. Beyond that we can only publish the platforms of the various parties so that the electorate may make its own choice.

    The main objective of this paper shall be to up-build our nationalism, to elevate and help build up our culture. Thus we dedicate the new volume of Svornost to all of our past and future patrons, readers and friends and we promise them they may depend on it, that they will always find it ready, unselfish and ardently, to support everything good, generous, and progressive in the National, Public and Social fields.

    In the name of education and enlightenment for Chicago Bohemians we start the fourth volume of the daily newspaper "Svornost." On this day Chicago Bohemians should be thankful that it ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 1, III A
  • Svornost -- November 25, 1878
    "Healthy Body, Healthy Mind"

    This is a saying of which the truth cannot be denied, and one which receives confirmation in professional circles. It seems that physical culture among Bohemian-Americans, and particularly among Chicago Bohemians, is not an important subject. In fact, it appears to be regarded with the utmost indifference everywhere among us. With more than 200,000 Bohemians in the United States we have only about 15 gymnastic societies, with about 800 members. Until the recent organization of the National Gymnastic Society the local units in most cases, scarcely subsisted.

    Merely 800 members of gymnastic societies among a population of 200,000 Bohemians! These figures do not do us much honor. Were it not for the improvement recently shown, we should have to admit that all hopes of establishing a physical culture program among our compatriots in the United States must be dismissed.

    We have noticed for some time past that our fellow-Bohemians are turning away 2from all that is beautiful and useful; that gymnastics, the theater, and many other arts are being neglected. They seem to have nothing else in mind except the organization of benevolent societies. We are not unfriendly to such organizations and wish them to be as successful as any others, for we acknowledge their usefulness. But we deplore the fact that on account of the continual organization of such societies all our other nationalistic efforts suffer.

    In Chicago, where we have 25,000 Bohemians, we have two gymnastic societies. How many members have they? Not quite two hundred. This is not proportionately enough. Five or six hundred gymnasts would not be too many for Chicago. So many could and should be counted as members of our two organizations. There are in our city so many Bohemian youths that if one fourth of them were to join either one or the other of our two societies, these organizations would be much larger. Our compatriots, however, continue to remain indifferent toward these organizations and instead of giving them support are actually withdrawing from them.

    Only a small part of our people take notice of these organizations, and Chicago 3Bohemians in general think of them only when some charitable purpose is to be undertaken. Then every one remembers that we have two national halls, that we have a Telocvicne Jednota Sokol (Sokol Gymnastic Society) and a Cesko Amerikansky Sokol (Bohemian-American Sokol), and that it is the duty of our racial organizations to support this or that good cause. That either of these gymnastic societies should be noticed at any other time seems to be out of the question.

    We believe, however, that no one can excuse himself from joining one of these societies by saying that he cannot afford it. The dues of both are so small as to be a burden to no one.

    We have written about this several times, and we repeat: Bohemian youth, concern yourselves about gymnastic organizations, help to uphold our national ideals, and increase your well-being by joining the Sokol National Gymnastic Society.

    This is a saying of which the truth cannot be denied, and one which receives confirmation in professional circles. It seems that physical culture among Bohemian-Americans, and particularly among Chicago ...

    Bohemian
    II B 3, III E, III A, II D 1, II D 10
  • Svornost -- December 09, 1878
    [Evening Classes in English]

    The teaching of English has begun in the evening school. Classes are held on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 7:30 P. M. Anyone wishing to join these classes will kindly report to Mr. Matas at 734 Morgan Street.

    The teaching of English has begun in the evening school. Classes are held on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 7:30 P. M. Anyone wishing to join these classes will kindly ...

    Bohemian
    I A 3, III A
  • Svornost -- December 21, 1878
    [New Lodge Organized]

    A new lodge was founded in our city under the name of "Cesko Slovansky Podporvjici Obcansky Rad Cislo I. (Czechoslovak Benefit Citizens Lodge No. I.)

    The objectives of this new organization are to have our country-men to seek to become naturalized citizens and the mutual benefit of its members. Any one who has been a member for six months or longer shall be entitled to sick-benefit payments of $5.00 weekly and in the event of death, the heirs shall be paid the sum of $600.00 within 36 days.

    A new lodge was founded in our city under the name of "Cesko Slovansky Podporvjici Obcansky Rad Cislo I. (Czechoslovak Benefit Citizens Lodge No. I.) The objectives of this new ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1, III A
  • Svornost -- January 13, 1879
    [New School Started]

    Last Sunday, in Chicago, there was started a new Sunday School to teach children the Bohemian language.

    The class room was fitted out by generous minded citizens of the 6th Ward. There was an immediate enrollment of (50) fifty children. Mr. August Geringer is the teacher.

    The Northwest side Sunday School, which is under the supervision of Mr. Reisla and Mr. Volenske is progressing rapidly and has bright prospects for the future.

    Last Sunday, in Chicago, there was started a new Sunday School to teach children the Bohemian language. The class room was fitted out by generous minded citizens of the 6th ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, IV, III A
  • Svornost -- July 17, 1879
    [Sokol Celebration]

    Damsky S'Bor Vlasta Cislo I (Vlasta Woman's Club No. 1) held a celebration yesterday in Telocyicne Jednota Sokol (Sokol Gymnastic Union) Hall in commemoration of the birth of the great Bohemian teacher and nationalist, Josef Jakob Jungmann.

    Mrs. Kl. Novak opened the session with an appropriate address referring to the deathless memory of Josef Jungmann, after which Miss Alb. Fligl gave a biographical lecture on this celebrated genius of ours, calling especial attention to all that Josef Jungmann did for Bohemian nationality. Several more short talks followed. Every speaker was applauded.

    It is to the honor of the Woman's club that it never forgets to honor the memory of those who merit remembrance. Toward midnight the ladies served a delightful supper. The entertainment was informal, and there were dancing and singing. It is to be regretted that so few young men attended.

    Damsky S'Bor Vlasta Cislo I (Vlasta Woman's Club No. 1) held a celebration yesterday in Telocyicne Jednota Sokol (Sokol Gymnastic Union) Hall in commemoration of the birth of the great ...

    Bohemian
    III B 2, III A, III H, II B 2 g, II B 1 c 3
  • Svornost -- January 19, 1880
    Bohemian in the Public Schools Discussion of This Matter in Yesterday's Meeting

    The mass meeting held yesterday afternoon on the premises of J. Sedlack was not attended so well as the purpose of the meeting required.

    The meeting was brought to order at 3:30 P.M. by Leo Meilbek. Fr. Dvorak was elected Chairman and Mr. Fiala as secretary. Thereafter Mr. L. Meilbek read a speech in which he laid stress on the need for a halt in the constant organization of new Bohemian Lodges to the detriment of our public, but that those existing should be improved for the general good. In his speech he argues that all Lodges and individuals should join forces in order to secure the instruction of the Bohemian Language in our public schools, and first of all in the Throop Street School where over half the pupils are of Bohemian extraction. with this thought in mind the following resolution was accepted unanimously--

    We American Citizens of Bohemian descent gathered in mass meeting on the premises of Citizen Jos. Sedlack, corner morgan and 19th Street, adopt the following:

    2

    (1) We call upon and urgently request all Bohemian Benevolent Associations and Lodges, whether public or secret, that they require all persons seeking membership in organizations, to become citizens of the United States and that the present members of these lodges and associations should likewise become citizens, in order that we may work in unison to secure equal rights in the public schools of Chicago, so that the teaching of the Bohemian Language may be adopted as soon as possible.

    (2) We urge citizens to join Political Parties, for it is our duty to discuss the various political questions arising from time to time. We must necessarily have public meetings for this purpose, for everyone knows that the discussion of politics in the meetings of our various lodges and associations is not permitted.

    (3) There shall be elected at this meeting a committee (composed of as many members as are decided on by those present) for the purpose of securing signatures of all our Bohemian countrymen who would like to have the Bohemian Language taught in our public schools.

    3

    That a committee of two be selected at this meeting, who are capable of working out the details of this matter and together with the signed petitions to present it to the School Board and further that this committee shall do all that they consider proper and of benefit to this cause and they shall from time to time call meetings so as to report on the progress of this matter.

    Then so that the first step in the matter might be an accomplished fact the petition to the School Board was drawn up as follows:

    Chicago, Jan. 19th 1880

    To the Honorable Board of Education of the City of Chicago.

    Gentlemen:

    We, the undersigned parents and guardians of children attending the Throop School, would most respectfully petition your Honorable Board to introduce the study of the Bohemian Language in said school for the following reasons: There are now attending this school 430 pupils of Bohemian parentage or about one-half of the total attendance, and as your Honorable Board 4caused the German Language to be taught in several schools, we as citizens and taxpayers demand the same recognition as is accorded to other nationalities.

    Finally it was decided to hold another meeting at this same place next Wednesday night, to which meeting all parents who are sending children to the Throop School are urgently requested to come. At this meeting the committee for the circulation of the above petition will be elected. Mrs. L. Meilbek and M. Baumruker were appointed to the committee which is to take the question up with the School Board.

    The importance of yesterday's meeting and those to come is plainly evident. It is for the individuals now and for our various Lodges especially to do their part, for if the German people can have their Language taught in 18 of our public schools, why can't we Bohemians in those sections of the city inhabited mainly by us have our mother tongue taught in the public schools?

    The mass meeting held yesterday afternoon on the premises of J. Sedlack was not attended so well as the purpose of the meeting required. The meeting was brought to order ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 b, I A 1 b, I C, III A, I F 2, II D 1
  • Svornost -- February 27, 1880
    Bohemian in Public Schools Unrecognized

    The petition of 258 parents and guardians of children attending the Throop School, for the inclusion of the Bohemian Language as a study, which was referred to a special committee for consideration some two weeks ago was the cause of considerable debate on the part of the School Board yesterday.

    The readers of Svornost know who the favorable members of the Board were and who were unfavorable. The way we indicated the last time we mentioned this matter is just the way it happened. Of the committee two members, Stiles and Stone, recommended favorable action by the School Board, whereas the obstinate German member, Vochke, who happened to preside over the committee, stood out against the introduction of the teaching of Bohemian in the Throop School.

    Mr. Stone said that the petition for the introduction of the study of the Bohemian Language in this school, is signed by more than half of the taxpayers of this school district and that the petitioners have just as much right to request the teaching of Bohemian as have the German citizens to have German taught in the public schools.

    2

    In opposition to this, Mr. Vocke claims that there is a great deal of difference between Germans and Bohemians, or in other words they are superior. He does not wish the Germans to be given any privileges before other nationalities, but the Bohemian Language is so unimportant that it must not be compared in the least with German. Use is made of the Bohemian Language in only two of the Educational Centers of the world, that is at Prague and Vienna, while the German Language must be considered as a major basis of culture. The knowledge of German is sufficient for every business man to carry on all transactions with benefit and advantage anywhere.

    In this same manner Mr. Richberg spoke, moving, in conclusion, that the Board proceed to vote on Mr. Stones motion that the teaching of Bohemian be permitted in the Throop School. The vote brought out the following results:

    For the introduction of Bohemian: Stone, Brennan, Frake, Curran and Stiles (5). Against:- Vocke, Richberg, Keith, Bartlett, Frankenthal, Delaney and Hayne. (7).

    3

    Therefore, by a majority of two votes the just petition of Bohemian Citizens was rejected and unrecognized.

    How easily could this petition of ours have been acted on favorably had it not been for the old, (still from the old country) German obstinate hatred which, in a contemptible and shameful manner, vented its spite on everything Bohemian even in this land of freedom. If these three Germans, Vocke, Richberg and Frankenthal had voted for the teaching of the Bohemian Language, we could be rejoicing today in the just disposition of our petition.

    We seek in this land of freedom, in this where the Bohemian element is second in numbers only to the Germans, only the recognition of our rights, Whether the Bohemian tongue is used in one or ten world centers does not concern us in the least; we are interested only in the preservation of our language and nationality, in the same manner that it concerned, and still concerns the German people. And since they have been given the privilege, why should they take it upon themselves to prevent us from acquiring a like privilege.

    4

    Finally, since impudence, selfishness, obstinacy and insolence is excessively rooted in the minds of all Germans, almost without exception, how then could we expect, even in this land of freedom, to receive any support from them? If, at some time or other, they seem to incline toward friendship, it is only because they want some help in some cause, but if they have an idea that they may be able to accomplish their objective without us, then all we get from them are dirty sneers and scorn and opposition to any effort whatever on our part.

    Our attempts, efforts, requests, and hopes for the teaching of the Bohemian language in the public school where over half of the pupils are of Bohemian parentage, were, since yesterday, destroyed, unrecognized and for the time being, we must submit. Perhaps we shall find other ways and means by which we shall finally receive our just rights.

    The petition of 258 parents and guardians of children attending the Throop School, for the inclusion of the Bohemian Language as a study, which was referred to a special committee ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 b, III A, I A 1 b, I C, I F 4