The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 02, 1905
    Bohemian District Invaded by Hoodlums

    P.1--The behavior of the pocket-picking, riffraff which traverses our Pilsen district on street-cars is growing more daring and more shameless by leaps and bounds. The day before yesterday our countryman Bedrich Holy, 172 Thirteenth Street was riding on the platform of a car. Suddenly a few boys, strangers, set upon him, beating him and going through his pockets, After they had got his small change, which luckily was not much, they threw him from the car.

    Mr. Holy will carry the memento of this adventure for a long time. It seems strange that the employees of the street-car company did not try to protect the victim.

    P.1--The behavior of the pocket-picking, riffraff which traverses our Pilsen district on street-cars is growing more daring and more shameless by leaps and bounds. The day before yesterday our countryman ...

    Bohemian
    I C, II E 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 28, 1905
    Abolish the Death Penalty!

    P.4--In no other part of the world is so much said or so much printed about executions, as in this country of ours, which we flatter ourselves by calling the most progressive and the best civilized on earth. Our newspapers print daily reports of executions. If the accused be a colored man, and the crime an ordinary murder, only brief mention is made of the occurence.

    If, however, the condemned man belongs to that class of criminals whose misdeeds create a sensation on account of peculiar circumstances, whole columns are devoted to the story for the "education" of the public. Readers must be informed about the details of crime, about the trial, about the startling points in the testimony, and about all the practical and unpractical juristic motions made by the defense to save the defendant's life. No one believes that such reading elevates the morals or promotes the perfection of mankind.

    All this would be different if our law did not cling to an ancient medieval rule: "An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, a life for a life."

    2

    Science has so far tried in vain to demonstrate to legislators by pointing out the congenital defects of the human mind and the influence of environment and circumstance how little man is responsible for what he is and does. Capital punishment, in most of our States, is apparently here to stay. In some States, truly enough, it has been abolished; for example, in the neighboring State of Wisconsin. But the States where the rule of Moses, "An eye for an eye" does not prevail are still very few.

    But there are other considerations, not of a scientific nature, which ought to be taken into account. We have read an article in a certain paper printed in English the gist of which we wish to communicate to our readers.

    "One of the consequences of the legalization of the death penalty, says this article, is the excitement created by the publication of details which might better be kept from the public. Even people with mature minds do not derive any benefit from such reports of the struggle for existence, whereas persons of hysterical tendencies and those who are afflicted with a morbid predilection for sensational stories are weakened thereby both morally and mentally.

    3

    "In the States which have abolished the death penalty those who read the accounts of murder trials are not wrought to so high a pitch of excitement. When the trial is over, and the verdict has been found, the interest ceases. Whatever is undertaken thereafter to obtain a new trial, an appeal, or a pardon fails to attract the attention of either the public or the press. The contention that capital punishment has a deterrent effect upon people who would otherwise be tempted to commit murder was refuted years ago by criminologists of the first rank. There have been times in which the ax, the rope, fire, or the sword was used to mete out punishment for crimes much less grave than murder; it was supposed that men would be deterred by the fear of punishment from committing such crimes.

    In our day the most progressive of our States have discarded medieval criminal laws and abolished capital punishment."

    P.4--In no other part of the world is so much said or so much printed about executions, as in this country of ours, which we flatter ourselves by calling the ...

    Bohemian
    I C, I H, II E 3, III B 1
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 05, 1906
    Protest Meeting.

    p. 2, col. 3 - The meeting which had for its purpose taking steps whereby better police protection would be provided in Bohemian California, and which was called for last night in Placek's hall, was attended by only about twenty citizens. Aldermen Uhlir and Zimmer of the 12th ward, and Mr. Cermak, a member of the state legislature, arrived on time and patiently waited, thinking that perhaps more citizens would arrive. However, when waiting proved to be of no avail, the meeting was started.

    Mr. J. Marek was elected chairman, and Mr. J. Cerny as secretary. The first to speak was Alderman Uhlir, who regretted the small attendance of citizens, because he had also invited the commanding officer of the Lawndale police station to be present at the meeting to hear complaints which the citizens have against the police.

    The police commander did not come and this angered Mr. Uhlir in the beginning, but when he saw how poorly the meeting was attended, he was glad. The Aldermen explained that the fault lies in the manner in which police are assigned to the Lawndale station. This station is considered some sort of penal colony, to which police are sent for punishment, when they have brought the anger of 2their superiors upon themselves for some reason or other.

    In order to remedy existing conditions the citizens must help the Aldermen. They must hold big protest meetings, they must see to it that reports of these meetings get into the daily papers and to the chief of police and the mayor. He who wants conditions changed must work himself, and agitate among those who are indifferent.

    The next meeting of citizens for this purpose will be held next Tuesday evening in Placek's hall. It is expected that it will be more numerously attended. It will be seen to that the proceedings and resolutions of the citizens will be published in the English daily newspapers and reported to the Chief of Police and to the mayor. An agitation committee was elected composed of the following: Messrs. Jiran, Prasil, Cerny, Marek and Cermak. Those present were urged by Mr. Cermak to agitate and bring as many of their friends as possible to next Tuesday's meeting.

    p. 2, col. 3 - The meeting which had for its purpose taking steps whereby better police protection would be provided in Bohemian California, and which was called for last ...

    Bohemian
    I F 2, I F 5, I F 4, I F 3, II E 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- February 10, 1910
    Editor Urges Action on Pension Law

    P.4--In April last year the Illinois legislature passed a resolution requesting Congress to support a motion made by Congressman Lubin for the enactment of a law similar to the old-age-pension laws in operation in several European countries. The measure provided that the Speaker of the House should name a committee of seven member whose task should be to study the diverse European systems, select elements from them, and formulate a proposition for the law best suited to our conditions. This committee was then to submit its findings to Congress not later than January, 1911.

    Lubin's motion was referred to the committee on commerce, but after that no trace of it could be found, although it is nigh time for the United States to step in line with other civilized countries and satisfy an urgent need. Although the idea of an old-age-pension law is almost entirely new in the United States, other countries have long overcome the initial difficulties naturally encountered in establishing such an institution.

    2

    The first country to try this experiment, which is worthy of emulation, was Germany, where in the year 1889 a law was enacted which established the pension system. The system was put on a broader basis by laws enacted in 1891 and 1899 These German old-age-pension laws affect twenty-five per cent of the population and require the state, the employers, and the employees to contribute to the pension fund. All working-men ever seventy years old and working-men unable for certain reasons to earn their livelihood are entitled to receive pensions.

    The next country to enact a pension law was Denmark, which allows a pension to men who have reached the age of sixty. New Zealand's law, enacted in 1897, directs that a pension of $2.50 shall be paid weekly to a man over sixty-five years old who has led a law-abiding life for the last twenty-five years. Many other countries have followed these examples. Belgium enacted a pension law in 1900 making the extent of the benefit dependent on the age of the recipient, the amount of duet which he has paid, and his actual need. Similarly, Austria, France, and Italy have absorbed the idea, improving their respective laws year by year. England in establishing its old-age pension granted to all men over seventy years old, according to 3circumstances, twenty-five cents to $1.25 per week. Canada passed its law in 1908, and Sweden and Norway are about to follow. Australia experimented till 1909, when it joined the other countries in establishing an old-age pension, with excellent results, as attested by American consuls.

    Why, then, should the United States lag behind others? We are proud of the pension which we allot to soldiers whether they need it or not, but we have no regard for the working-man, who is as necessary as the soldier for the common welfare, and who, like the soldier, jeopardizes his life in the performance of his duty.

    The objection raised on account of the easy way in which immigrants can obtain American citizenship does not appear to be well grounded. Nobody demands that every newcomer shall be entitled to draw a pension immediately after he has become a citizen nor at the moment when he has attained the required ago. It is not necessary that the benefit shall involve the question of citizenship at all; it should depend on the time which the immigrant has spent in the United States as a wage-earner or an otherwise usefully active member of the community. The requisite number of years of 4activity in the United States ought to be fixed first, and a clause should be included stating that only men with a clean past shall be eligible. This limitation would be bound to bear fruit in compelling many a man of mischievous tendencies to take thought and turn over a new leaf. Thus a contemplated decrease in crime would be another reason for the enactment of a pension law.

    P.4--In April last year the Illinois legislature passed a resolution requesting Congress to support a motion made by Congressman Lubin for the enactment of a law similar to the old-age-pension ...

    Bohemian
    I H, II E 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- April 26, 1911
    The Committee of the Bohemian Charitable Association Has Secured the Aid of the State Officials in the Search for Ella Paroubka

    Municipal Judge Uhlir, Alderman A. J. Cermak, Municipal Judge Thomas Scully and other distinguished citizens, almost all of whom are members of the Bohemian Charitable Association, visited Governor Deneen at Springfield yesterday, and requested the aid of State officials in the search for the missing Bohemian girl, Ella Paroubka. First of all, the committee wanted the State to offer a reward for the finding of the missing child. The Governor consulted with State's Attorney Stead, who informed him that under existing law the State was not allowed to offer any rewards for the finding of missing persons, except in cases where it concerned the capture of a murderer.

    However, a method has been found whereby the State will be empowered to take action, and participate in this instance. Steps will be taken by the State 2Legislature to amend the law in such a manner as will permit the posting of a $200 reward to anyone who finds the missing child, and brings an end to the tortures endured by the parents of the child. Aside from that, the State authorities will aid in other ways in the search.

    Chicago police are more and more inclined to the belief that the missing girl was not carried off by gypsies, but that she lost her life in the drainage canal.

    Yesterday, detectives made a search among the Italian organ-grinders. It is said that the police found two girls yesterday who stated that they saw Ella Paroubka playing along the banks of the drainage canal on the afternoon of the day on which she disappeared. A search will be made along the old canal, (so called Mud-Lake) which in former days claimed so many victims among Bohemian children.

    Municipal Judge Uhlir, Alderman A. J. Cermak, Municipal Judge Thomas Scully and other distinguished citizens, almost all of whom are members of the Bohemian Charitable Association, visited Governor Deneen at ...

    Bohemian
    I E, I H, II E 3, II D 10
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 02, 1911
    The City Council to Offer Five Hundred Dollars Reward for the Discovery of the Whereabouts of Ella Paroubek

    Alderman Anton J. Cermak introduced a resolution at the meeting yesterday of the City Council which provides that the Council authorize the Chief of Police to offer a $500 reward for the finding of Ella Paroubek. The resolution was accepted and turned over to the finance committee.

    There is not the least doubt that the committee will take favorable action in the matter, and the reward for the discovery of the missing girl will then amount to $1200. The Bohemian Charitable Association has subscribed $500, the State has subscribed $200, and now the Council has subscribed $500.

    Alderman Anton J. Cermak introduced a resolution at the meeting yesterday of the City Council which provides that the Council authorize the Chief of Police to offer a $500 reward ...

    Bohemian
    II D 10, IV, II E 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 11, 1911
    Assistance for the Paroubeks

    Mr. Frantisek Paroubek, with his wife, parents of the unfortunate Ella Paroubek, called upon Judge Sabath yesterday. They informed the Judge that all their means had been exhausted in the search for their daughter, and requested him to help them in some manner in arranging for the burial of their daughter. Judge Sabath gave them twenty-five dollars with which to defray the most urgent expenses, and recommended them to States Attorney, Mr. Smejkal, who is a member of the Board of Directors of the Bohemian National Cemetery, for the purpose of providing a lot for the burial of Ella. It will be difficult to do anything in this respect, because the by-laws of the Cemetery Association on this point forbid such contributions. Perhaps, however,the Association will be able to help in some other manner, unless the management of the Catholic Cemetery offers to provide a burial place free of cost.

    Mr. Frantisek Paroubek, with his wife, parents of the unfortunate Ella Paroubek, called upon Judge Sabath yesterday. They informed the Judge that all their means had been exhausted in the ...

    Bohemian
    II D 10, II E 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 12, 1911
    Ella Paroubek The Funeral of the Unfortunate Victim of a Criminal Act Attended by Many People

    Funeral services were held yesterday morning for little Ella Paroubek, who, prior to five weeks ago, was kidnapped, held prisoner, and finally murdered and thrown into the drainage canal. There were many floral offerings banked about the small coffin. Among the donors of floral pieces were: Mayor Carter H. Harrison, Municipal Judges Sabath and Uhlir, and Alderman Anton J. Cermak.

    By ten o'clock, there were so many people gathered before the home that the police guard had to be increased to keep order. Shortly after, the coffin was carried out of the house, followed by the family. Mrs. Paroubek was seated beside the coffin, while Mr. Jaromir R. Psenka gave a touching funeral oration. This was the only rite performed, and the coffin was then placed into the hearse and taken to the Bohemian National Cemetery.

    2

    The police have now turned their efforts toward the discovery of the murderer with the same energy with which they previously sought to locate the missing girl.

    Funeral services were held yesterday morning for little Ella Paroubek, who, prior to five weeks ago, was kidnapped, held prisoner, and finally murdered and thrown into the drainage canal. There ...

    Bohemian
    II E 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 16, 1911
    The Bohemian Charitable Association Considers Offering a Reward for the Capture of the Murderer of Eila Paroubek

    The executive committee of the Bohemian Charitable Association held a special meeting relative to the Paroubek case. Judge J. Z. Uhlir presided. It was announced in this meeting that the fifty dollars, which was appropriated to aid in the search for Ella Paroubek, had been disbursed. The main proceedings of the meeting centered around the $500 which had been subscribed as a reward for the discovery of Ella alive. Now, since it is known that she is dead, it has been moved that this reward be offered to the one who finds her murderer. The motion carried, and it was decided to write to all those who subscribed to the original reward to find out if they agreed with the decision, and if they were willing to dedicate the sum subscribed toward this purpose.

    2

    In as much as the Paroubek family, by reason of the misfortune, is absolutely penniless, a motion was made and carried, that a loan in the sum of fifty dollars be made to it. In accordance with the motion, a three member committee, consisting of Messrs. Loula, Turek and Foucek, are to visit and speak to Mr. Paroubek.

    There is no doubt but that all those who subscribed sums for the discovery of the missing girl will also agree that this same fund shall apply as a reward for the discovery of the murderer. If the money were not successful in finding the child, it will aid the desire of people in bringing the criminal to justice, thereby making him harmless in the future, and serve as a warning to others who might seek to cause misfortune to some other family.

    The executive committee of the Bohemian Charitable Association held a special meeting relative to the Paroubek case. Judge J. Z. Uhlir presided. It was announced in this meeting that the ...

    Bohemian
    II E 2, II D 10, II E 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- October 13, 1912
    The Work with Youth in Svatopluk Cech Park

    The administration of Svatopluk Cech Park, is notifying parents that the work with children inside the park building will begin tomorrow, October 14. The gymnasiums for both boys and girls will be open from 3:30 to 9:30 P. M. The hours for school children are from 3:30 to 6 P. M., for employed youths, 7 to 9 P. M. The gymnastic teacher for the boys is Mr. Frat. Zettek whose experience guarantees that he will train the boys in all that is beneficial for their health. Boys nine years old and up are admitted. The age of admission for girls is the same. They will be taught various healthful exercises, steps, and drills by Miss Snevely, and they will drill to the piano accompaniment of Miss M. Petru.

    Children under nine years of age will also be taken care of. They will have a large room of their own, directed by Miss Goldsmith, who will play with them and keep an eye on them daily from 3 to 5 P. M.

    Every Saturday from 2 to 3 P. M., children of eight years and up will be 2taught Bohemian folk songs by Mr. Liska of the Conservatory of Music of Prague. All instruction is absolutely free of charge. We therefore urge parents not to miss the opportunity of sending their children to the Park as soon as they return from school. They will be much better taken care of than if they were on the streets where there is constant danger.....

    The administration of Svatopluk Cech Park, is notifying parents that the work with children inside the park building will begin tomorrow, October 14. The gymnasiums for both boys and girls ...

    Bohemian
    II D 6, II E 3, II B 3, II B 2 f