The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Svornost -- May 24, 1878
    [Concert for Benefit of Newsboys' Home]

    The "Strakosova Spolecnost" (Strakosova Opera Company) gave a second concert at the Tabernacle last night. The proceeds to be used for the benefit of the Newsboys Home.

    It was a brilliant success and like the previous concert pleased a large audience, thereby making available a considerable amount for this generous purpose.

    The "Strakosova Spolecnost" (Strakosova Opera Company) gave a second concert at the Tabernacle last night. The proceeds to be used for the benefit of the Newsboys Home. It was a ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 b
  • Svornost -- April 18, 1879
    [Eminent Musician Takes Up Residence in Chicago]

    The eminent musician, and countryman of ours, Mr. Koula, who recently arrived in Chicago with the H. M. S. Pinafore Company has sent for his wife and family to join him. Mr. Koula will settle permanently in Chicago and will teach music here.

    His ability leads him to believe that he will be patronized by his countrymen. We also wish him much success.

    The eminent musician, and countryman of ours, Mr. Koula, who recently arrived in Chicago with the H. M. S. Pinafore Company has sent for his wife and family to join ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 b
  • Svornost -- October 04, 1879
    Our Bohemian Singing

    The singing societies are, of all our national societies, probably the foremost defenders and upholders of our nationalism in this strange land. Their only purpose and function is the maintenance of the Bohemian Song in its original form so dear to the Bohemian soul, so sweet and cheerful in jolly or troubled times. Their fruits have access to the hearts of all. They are for young and old, for rich and poor, entertaining and encouraging. It is admitted that the singing societies in America are great benefactors to our nationalism, their efforts should be supported by all in the larger communities.

    We have a Bohemian singing club in practically every large city such as New York, Cleveland, Milwaukee, St. Louis and Chicago and everyone of them is to be heard one or more times each year. It is joyful and praiseworthy. We should be more than pleased with the awakening of Bohemian singing in Chicago of late, of such great activity among the lodges that it is impossible to even compare the feeble efforts of the past few years.

    2

    The greatest credit for this awakening is due to the choirmaster, Mr. Jan Geringer, who devotes two evenings each week to teaching of singing, free of charge. He is not only capable but ardently active in the teaching and is the director of the singing club "Lyre."

    The singing societies are, of all our national societies, probably the foremost defenders and upholders of our nationalism in this strange land. Their only purpose and function is the maintenance ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 b
  • Svornost -- March 27, 1880
    A Promising Bohemian Youth.

    The pupils of Prof. Prosinger recently gave a concert in the Natteson Bldg. which was very successful and for us Bohemians the more significant because of all the pupils the most outstanding performance was that of a young countryman of our Josef Vilim in his violin rendition of Ernests "Elegie."

    His playing showed such fine harmony, such wonderful skill that the audience was enraptured.

    Mr. Vilim is about 17 years old and a brother of the well-known Mrs. Bedlan.

    The pupils of Prof. Prosinger recently gave a concert in the Natteson Bldg. which was very successful and for us Bohemians the more significant because of all the pupils the ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Svornost -- December 27, 1880
    Concert by "Slovak" Band

    Last night the Slovak Band made their first public appearance in the hall of the Bohemian-English School and if we wish to be truthful we must admit that they made for themselves many friends and their performance was entirely satisfactory to the public.

    The program was begun with the national song "Kde domov muj"(Where Is My Home?) to which was added the " World March " by V. Resare of Prairie du Chien. The very first number pleased the audience in full and was received with unrestricted applause. The program was made up of the following additional numbers:-

    2. Centennial Overture by Kabuly
    3. Cavatina from Opera Marie Rudeng Donizetti
    4. San Souci Overture J. Kouly, sr.
    5. Solo for Cornet played by V. Mracek
    6. Gallop Sleighride J. Binke
    7. Solo for Clarinet
    8. Air Vavre Fantasia J. Mohra

    played by J. Koula, Jr.

    2
    9.Overture Amazons Kisler
    10. Polka J. Koula, Sr.
    11. Romance Kalivoda

    The band is made up of 25 musicians and the performance yesterday was under the leadership of the well-known composer and band-master J. Koula, Sr. to whom belongs in a large measure the credit for the success of the concert, and for showing what can be accomplished by good will.

    It is time that Chicago was able to have a strong band which does not primarily seek after profits but looks to music as an art.

    Success to the "Slovak" Band, its director,and to its future performances.

    Last night the Slovak Band made their first public appearance in the hall of the Bohemian-English School and if we wish to be truthful we must admit that they made ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 b
  • Svornost -- February 08, 1881
    Band Concert

    Several times in the past we have given it as our opinion, that Bohemian musicians would benefit not only the Bohemian public, but themselves as well in an artistic and material manner, if they would take an example from the musicians of other nationalities, namely the German, and unite themselves into a well organized band. We said at that time, that there were plenty of Bohemian musicians in our city and that it would require nothing more than a little good fellowship, patience and industry, so that an understanding of such importance as an independent Bohemian band could exist and do well, serving us and itself with honor. Many otherwise reasonable musicians merely smiled at this suggestion and insisted that in no way was it possible to even think of organizing and maintaining anything of the kind.

    The desired organization of Chicago Bohemian musicians into a band, did not materialize and we took it for granted that there was no use giving it any further thought.

    We were mistaken however and graciously acknowledge that same. Several musicians belonging to the "C.S.P.S." (Czecho-Slavak Benefit Society) united to form the 2nucleus of a band and it did not take long before they were strenghtened by the addition of other musicians. As leader of the new band was found the well-known composer and musician, Mr. Jen Koula.

    The very first performance in public by this band was an honor to them and last Sunday's concert was played in the hall of "Ces. Am. Sokol" (Bohemian American Sokol.)

    Several times in the past we have given it as our opinion, that Bohemian musicians would benefit not only the Bohemian public, but themselves as well in an artistic and ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 b, II D 1, I C
  • Svornost -- April 26, 1881
    Concert by Slovak Band

    We Czecho-Slavaks of Chicago, having in our midst good musicians and leaders, can verily say that, in so far as music is concerned, we need not step aside for the musicians of any other nationality. We have many Bohemian musicians in Chicago, who adhere to music with a whole-souled enthusiasm.

    When Jan Balatka, in his time settled in Chicago, rather when he twined his considerations toward Chicago, there was here at that time the "Slovanska Lipa" (Slovak Basswood) he wanted to help the musicians of this organization call the attention of the Chicago music world to them. Balatka became a master and as such is recognized in all musical centers in spite of the fact that of the Bohemian "Jan" was made a German "Hans".

    The long neglect of music of the Bohemians by really good musicians was finally ended by the organization of a fine band and in a little more than a half year the accomplishments are surprising. Twenty-eight Bohemian musicians formed an organization known as the Slovak Band and in musical circles of all nationalities have earned themselves favorable recognition 2either as individuals or as an organization. Under the leadership of J. Koula, they have progressed in a short period of time so far that they have already given three concerts. The Slovak Band appeared before the public in the Bohemian English Liberal School where it was received cordially by an overflowing attendance of citizenry. We believe it would be proper for all local musicians to join the band and thereby strengthen it as much as possible.

    The Concert given last Sunday by the Slovak Band can be considered on a par with the performance of "Mudra's Band" from Cleveland last summer. The program consisted of twelve numbers among which were the following: Tannhaeuser, by Wagner, followed by an Overture, by Suppe, a violin solo played by J. Kostka. Selections from Les Huguenots; Oberon--overture by Weber. The excellent clarinetist, J. Koula, Jr., chose the Carnival of Venice as his solo number.

    Echoes from Home by Lanna was played as a duet by Mr. F. Tryner and Mr. V. Klocem.

    3

    Koula's Bohemian quartet brought the audience to an enthusiastic applause and praise. The same can be said of the rendition of the Overture to "William Tell."

    The closing three numbers, Selections from "The Bohemian Girl," "The Waltz of the Recruiting Officers" and a "Gallop" were likewise received with enthusiasm and had to be repeated.

    Deserving mention is made of the youthful Flutist, Kaunovsky, he promises to become a great musician.

    If the Slovak Band in this last concert did not achieve material success, it was doubly successful from an artistic viewpoint.

    We Czecho-Slavaks of Chicago, having in our midst good musicians and leaders, can verily say that, in so far as music is concerned, we need not step aside for the ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Svornost -- February 06, 1882
    Opinion about Bohemian Entertainment

    Today's English newspapers of Chicago are carrying a report on the appearance of the esteemed Bohemian artist "Klementina Kalasova" at Saturday's masquerade ball. They write as follows:- The Dramatic Club of the "Tel Jed Sokol" (Gymnastic Union Sokol) last Saturday night gave a masquerade ball in honor of Miss Kalasova of the Mapleson Opera Company. The lady is a Bohemian by birth; full of national pride she sought our her countrymen in our City. Because she did not locate them until the latter part of the week, she was forced to forego earlier plans for a concert and merely rendered a few selections of National Bohemian interest before a large and enthusiastic gathering.

    After innumerable encores, Miss Kalasova was formally thanked for her kindness and was presented with a beautiful floral bouquet.

    Then followed an informal reception, during which, those present, vied with one another for introductions to the guest of Honor. It was a very sociable affair and every one left fully satisfied.

    Today's English newspapers of Chicago are carrying a report on the appearance of the esteemed Bohemian artist "Klementina Kalasova" at Saturday's masquerade ball. They write as follows:- The Dramatic Club ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 b
  • Svornost -- January 04, 1896
    [Alois Novak Enters New Field]

    Mr. Alois Novak, noted violin virtuoso, who has gained approval of the local public during his concerts, before the Chicago audience, has ventured into a new field of activity by teaching violin.

    Mr. Novak is a graduate of the Conservatory of Music at Prague. We are sure that he will give excellent artistic direction to his pupils.

    Mr. Novak's address is 157 Banker Street, or 724 West 18th Street.

    Mr. Alois Novak, noted violin virtuoso, who has gained approval of the local public during his concerts, before the Chicago audience, has ventured into a new field of activity by ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 b
  • Svornost -- February 24, 1896
    Ondricek Concert.

    The list of successes and glories of the violin king Franz Ondricek was augmented by yesterday's concert in Falcon Pilsen Hall.

    Yesterday's Bohemian concert of Franz Ondricek was frequented not only by prominent Bohemians from Chicago, but from other distant Bohemian centers.

    We noticed among others the prominent physician, Mr. Scvera from Cedar Rapids, Carl Proharka from Peoria, Ill. Norbert Voit from St. Louis, and many others. All Bohemian communities were richly represented. Before 8 P. M. all seats were sold out at high prices. The hall was filled with the elite of Bohemian society in Chicago. The program was mostly of choicest national pieces interpreted by Franz Ondricek. Also on the program were Mrs. Anna Hlavacek -Ondricek, soprano; trio for piano, violin and cello played by Messrs. Holub, Capak and Karas, and A. Ernst, baritone.

    Endless bravos and encores showed the enthusiastic approval of the audience.- The concert was followed by a banquet for the invited guests.

    The list of successes and glories of the violin king Franz Ondricek was augmented by yesterday's concert in Falcon Pilsen Hall. Yesterday's Bohemian concert of Franz Ondricek was frequented not ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 b